Pointless plastics..

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5 hours ago, Anna66 said:

Sadly though my children (who are now adults) are not interested or (were not interested) in learning how to repair things or sew. My partner he can repair things really well. We tried getting our kids to be interested but they just don't care. What can you do?

 

It probably seems a lot of "work". I resew buttons, it's easy, and it always makes me think of my great-grandmother, who taught me (she also taught my older sister how to knit, she she still does). Small tears, no biggie. As a kid, my jeans would normally look like Frankenstein's monster. We always had cats in the house, and it was inevitable that clothing would get holes torn in them. At a certain age, when I asked my mom to repair something on her sewing machine, she'd say "do it yourself" (we also did our own laundry from age 9-10 or so) and let me have a go. Actually, I miss having a sewing machine. I take jeans to repair tailors here, because as a daily cyclist, jean crotches will eventually wear thin, rip and tear no matter what. Most socks admittedly I just bin, as I feel the repairs are not worth it on the cheap stretchy material. For nicer socks, I do repair them, and have done some darning now and then.

 

Replacement clothes or undergarments are so 'cheap', that I kinda get why a lot of people don't bother. I think it genuinely just doesn't occur to many that a few minutes of stitching is simple stuff. 

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9 hours ago, LeonG said:

I would agree.  I have friends who bought an old house and renovated and they've never stopped renovating.  A couple of years later they were already renovating the renovations.  They've taken loads of perfectly good furniture to the dump.  For example they had a couch they were talking about replacing.  I asked them if I can have it if they do.  They said sure.  A while later I find out they've replaced it and threw the old one away.  Why not donate it?  I'm sure there are loads of ppl who need but can't afford one.

 

Slightly different, but with food. Years back I had a colleague in a shared office who would routinely throw away perfectly good barely touched food simply because she somehow didn't like it... I once watched her throw a whole bag of grapes in the bin after she ate one, and said "bah, these are no good" (they were fine, I rescued them after). It used to drive me and our other officemate insane. We'd often pick the food out of the bin and take it home with us, or just tell her to give it to us. Sandwiches from bakeries, salads from supermarkets, chocolate with one square gone, 1/4 eaten bread/rolls, fruit with one bite taken... At restaurants she could be a real diva, too.

 

To no one's shock, it slowly came out that she was independently quite well-off thanks to a rich ex-husband, and had also grown up rather privileged as the educated upper-class of a developing country... her father a diplomat, links to ruling party, etc. (Her young children enjoyed the same until she moved them here)

 

She straight-up bought a house within the first month of moving to Germany. Around the time she left the office, she was contemplating buying a new car because she didn't like her current new one (Landrover). And all the while, she would constantly gripe about being a down-on-her-luck struggling single mom (cohabiting with her long-term German boyfriend). She was actually a nice person, but y'know, some people...

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9 hours ago, alderhill said:

 

It probably seems a lot of "work". I resew buttons, it's easy, and it always makes me think of my great-grandmother, who taught me (she also taught my older sister how to knit, she she still does). Small tears, no biggie. As a kid, my jeans would normally look like Frankenstein's monster. We always had cats in the house, and it was inevitable that clothing would get holes torn in them. At a certain age, when I asked my mom to repair something on her sewing machine, she'd say "do it yourself" (we also did our own laundry from age 9-10 or so) and let me have a go. Actually, I miss having a sewing machine. I take jeans to repair tailors here, because as a daily cyclist, jean crotches will eventually wear thin, rip and tear no matter what. Most socks admittedly I just bin, as I feel the repairs are not worth it on the cheap stretchy material. For nicer socks, I do repair them, and have done some darning now and then.

 

Replacement clothes or undergarments are so 'cheap', that I kinda get why a lot of people don't bother. I think it genuinely just doesn't occur to many that a few minutes of stitching is simple stuff. 

 

Yes this is the case, and it is alot of work. I tend to buy things second hand and repair them. I just find it sad that the skills to sew a button back on, or to repair a door hinge, that these skills are being lost. I can see why though as it is time consuming and expensive. It is cheaper to just "throw away and buy new".

 

Also that vocations such as carpentry, plumbing etc... are of no interest to the younger generation. That we are becoming more dependant on machines and computers. It seems to be the sad way of the world.

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9 hours ago, Anna66 said:

...vocations such as carpentry, plumbing etc... are of no interest to the younger generation.

I keep hearing this and do not entirely agree. Tend to think that our young'uns are overloaded by choice of activity and distraction. They seem not to develop the staying power to actually learn a skill. Activity zapping. We stuck at stuff at an early age at least in part because there was not much else going. The boredom factor if you like. The button jar was SO interesting!

 

Also tried to teach my lass the basics of needlework to no avail. Not sure she would know what to do after threading a needle. Surely she will feel embarrassed/in a fix one day. Have I failed as a mother? Her fine motor skills - dexterity, use of fingers - while probably still on the graph are not impressive. Thrilled to see Spider has such talents! (And why not indeed?) I was never so disdainful of a(n admittedly already privately disliked) colleague who was incapable of sewing up a hole on a fluffy - fine art not required - jumper. I did it for her, tutting all the while in disbelief that anyone could be so... (insert negative adjective).

 

Once sewed a button on a senior colleague's jacket - not exactly in my job description :lol: - and scored so many gratitude points it was untrue.

 

To those who say "Why bother?" I would say for the pleasure. Hurtful yes, if your stuff eventually gets slung out with ignorant disregard for the effort it took to make, but you still had all the pleasure, at the time of making something.

 

 

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My sister said her older son would be picky with his clothes, can't wear this, don't like those kind of socks or whatever but once he was married with a baby and in the process of buying a condo, his ability to wear uncool clothes had changed quite a bit.  When you are living with parents and all your money is fun money, you can chuck that shirt with a little tear on it or a missing button in a corner and buy a new one.  When you are on your own and don't have the budget to keep buying new stuff, maybe you are more willing to fix what you have.

 

As for the trades, i think they are all hurting for apprentices right now.  Even more so the ones that have uncool working hours like a baker or a cook.  Most parents want their kids to study as well.

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I hate sewing! I had to learn it in a home economics class (only for girls) in the 7th grade. Hated it then and still hate it. One year when I was married and in my 20's, my mother gave me a sewing machine for Xmas for some unknown reason.

 

I sew on my buttons. He sews on his. For everything else there is a tailor just around the corner.

 

I used to love counted cross stitch but the older I get, the less I like fiddly things. Not to mention my eyesight isn't what it used to be.

 

I'm certain that my son doesn't sew. Not sure about his wife. Something that I would never ask.

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I love making things. I have friends who can’t or don‘t want to.  So I make gifts, like quilts, for them to gift others and they pay me for the supply costs.  Then I get the joy and they get something too.  Works for everyone.  I don’t wanna make things to sell them, just for pleasure.  Mass producing just takes all the creative joy out of it.

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10 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

I hate sewing! I had to learn it in a home economics class (only for girls) in the 7th grade. Hated it then and still hate it. 

Not for everyone.  And doesn’t need to be.  I enjoy it, but I totally get why some people don’t.   And there are only so many hours in a day.

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6 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

 Mass producing just takes all the creative joy out of it.

 

How so? I have many friends who knit, quilt, do carpentry, etc. Mass producing doesn't stop them. 

 

I do get that when the need isn't there, people don't have to do those things any more. I think it is good that people with a passion can do them and others not be "forced" to any more. Remember the days when women had to do all of those things without a choice? Men not, of course.

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2 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

How so? I have many friends who knit, quilt, do carpentry, etc. Mass producing doesn't stop them. 

 

I do get that when the need isn't there, people don't have to do those things any more. I think it is good that people with a passion can do them and others not be "forced" to any more. Remember the days when women had to do all of those things without a choice? Men not, of course.

What I mean is that for me, if I make a cool item and keep making it then I get bored and don’t feel creatively fueled.  I really make things geared toward the recipient’s individual taste.  For instance, I have made hundreds of really cool shopping bags, but every one is truly unique. Many people have urged me to sell things, but for me that would add stress to it.  And I just wanna have fun.  Anyway, I left my Bernina in the US cuz it won’t work here and I’ve taken a break for the time being.  That’s been good, but I do miss not just being able to whip up a cool set of placemats ad coasters lately.  

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Just now, BethAnnBitt said:

What I mean is that for me, if I make a cool item and keep making it then I get bored and don’t feel creatively fueled.

You are so right about women having been forced to do that stuff when they didn’t want to.  Shouldn’t happen to men or women in any setting.  Knitting and quilting are just fun hobbies for me.  I also did weaving for a time and made fused glass earrings.  

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13 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

How so? I have many friends who knit, quilt, do carpentry, etc. Mass producing doesn't stop them. 

 

I do get that when the need isn't there, people don't have to do those things any more. I think it is good that people with a passion can do them and others not be "forced" to any more. Remember the days when women had to do all of those things without a choice? Men not, of course.

Naughty last sentence, fraufruit! I reckon men often had to do things they didn’t want to do.

It works both ways.

 

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Oh, I can vouch for that. Mine does all sorts of household stuff which he is neither very good at nor likes, but has to do anyway. And I just referred to him as 'mine' which is stripping him of all sorts of rights and whatever no doubt.

 

Hey ho.

 

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1 hour ago, fraufruit said:

Remember the days when women had to do all of those things without a choice? Men not, of course.

 

Those days certainly existed, and in some parts of the world still do exist! Female emancipation really is to everyone's benefit. But historically lots of men had tough lives full of undesirable work, too. Some still do! 

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4 hours ago, LeonG said:

As for the trades, i think they are all hurting for apprentices right now.  Even more so the ones that have uncool working hours like a baker or a cook.  Most parents want their kids to study as well.


A couple years (?) back there was a program on the ARD Mediathek, whose name I really can't recall, basically about this for butchers. It was about a (very small) group of Azubis (and their Meisters) who are keeping the butcher profession alive.

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Just now, alderhill said:


A couple years (?) back there was a program on the ARD Mediathek, whose name I really can't recall, basically about this for butchers. It was about a (very small) group of Azubis (and their Meisters) who are keeping the butcher profession alive.

 

I heard on the radio a couple of years ago that they were talking to a business owner who claimed that 10 years earlier they had two applicants for each vacant apprentice position and these days they have one applicant for every two.  I don't think it's the same for every trade though. The ones with the unpopular hours are the first.  I had trouble with my car somewhere out in the boonies and the ADAC guy who came to help me said that he's well over 70 and wants to retire but can't find anybody who will take over his tow truck business.  Bad hours you know.

 

I also knew a young guy who was working part time as a pizza delivery driver who said he really wanted to apprentice.. but.. it had to be good hours, he didn't want to work weekends or shifts nor travel plus it couldn't be too physically demanding.  He claimed he was applying and not getting hired which unless he was lying, might have been because the employers saw him dripping with entitlement and decided he would pose a problem.

 

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14 hours ago, optimista said:

I keep hearing this and do not entirely agree. Tend to think that our young'uns are overloaded by choice of activity and distraction. They seem not to develop the staying power to actually learn a skill. Activity zapping. We stuck at stuff at an early age at least in part because there was not much else going. The boredom factor if you like. The button jar was SO interesting!

 

 

 I think it is more that they have a wider choice now, and do not have to learn things like that.

 

I learned how to sew in school in home economics. I did not learn it from my mother. I just think it is a useful skill to have.

 

My partner is excellent at DIY, but sadly my son is just not interested in learning how to fix hinges, put a letter box up. He is interested in putting computers together though :P  That is one skill that was passed on!

 

As you say, they are overloaded by a choice! There is just so much to choose from nowadays, spoiled for choice.

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Did you know that in times of yore, fisherman used to knit as well as the women. Even while walking! Constantly on the go. They had to get it done or freeze in the weather. Also I was intrigued to see that making and repairing fishing nets is actually just big crochet. Yes, really. So credit, where credit's due.

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3 hours ago, optimista said:

Did you know that in times of yore, fisherman used to knit as well as the women. Even while walking! Constantly on the go. They had to get it done or freeze in the weather. Also I was intrigued to see that making and repairing fishing nets is actually just big crochet. Yes, really. So credit, where credit's due.

 

In Iceland, they were mostly sheep farmers so they would be really busy in summer making hay and in winter, they'd all sit around and tell stories and knit.

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4 hours ago, optimista said:

Did you know that in times of yore, fisherman used to knit as well as the women. Even while walking! Constantly on the go. They had to get it done or freeze in the weather. Also I was intrigued to see that making and repairing fishing nets is actually just big crochet. Yes, really. So credit, where credit's due.

I was at a New Year‘s Eve Party in NY years ago.  My yarn was all tangled up and the old Italian guy there untangled it for me.  said it was just like doing that for fishing nets back in the old country.  😂. Was a joy to watch him. 

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