Pointless plastics..

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There are new laws about making appliances easier to repair, with requirements for design changes to allow this and with spare parts must be available for at least 10 years,  Unfortunately, the manufacturers managed to insist that the spare parts are only available to independent professionals, not consumers due to "safety issues".   

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You can order iphone spare parts and attempt to install them yourself.  I also found this "fairphone" when I was surfing for something else a while ago:  https://www.fairphone.com/de/  They seem to have plenty of spare parts available.

 

Sure a professional wants to make a decent living but sometimes they take you for a ride too, replacing parts that don't need to be replaced.  If you can't fix things yourself and don't have someone available that you trust, sometimes you are better off buying new.

 

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1 hour ago, SpiderPig said:

And thats why we live in the disposable world!

Yes. We have become de-skilled.

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16 minutes ago, LeonG said:

...a professional wants to make a decent living but sometimes they take you for a ride too, replacing parts that don't need to be replaced.

My experience of (non-PC adjective) dentists.:(

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2 hours ago, Anna66 said:

I read this about a woman who did her old kitchen up using adhesive rolls rather than buying a whole new one.

Um we`ve been doing that for about the last 10 years,every 2 or 3 years recover the units and they look like new.

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8 minutes ago, Keleth said:

Um we`ve been doing that for about the last 10 years,every 2 or 3 years recover the units and they look like new.

 

Good for you. Lots of people don't though.

 

What is really unbelievable is the amount of people nowadays who cannot sew. They just throw things away if they tear. We sew and repair everything.

 

Sadly though my children (who are now adults) are not interested or (were not interested) in learning how to repair things or sew. My partner he can repair things really well. We tried getting our kids to be interested but they just don't care. What can you do?

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6 minutes ago, Anna66 said:

We sew and repair everything.

Who on here had a mum who didn`t have a tin full of buttons.

 

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I repair any torn clothing as long as its a Tear and not a hole due to wear and tear...   Buttons?? Yeah, I do them in my sleep!..

 

Re-sole shoes if its viable and I even clean mine and my daughters shoes!!     Who actually cleans/polishes their shoes these days?

 

In the past, I have just bought new fronts for my kitchen cupboards and flogged the old ones for a few shillings.. 

 

I am currently collecting Ikea Cupboard carcases for the Barn conversion when its ready for a kitchen... 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, snowingagain said:

There are new laws about making appliances easier to repair, with requirements for design changes to allow this and with spare parts must be available for at least 10 years,  Unfortunately, the manufacturers managed to insist that the spare parts are only available to independent professionals, not consumers due to "safety issues".   

You have to remember that companies will charge the earth for spares because first of all you need the item  - tends to be a distress purchase and people don't really go out and buy a replacement appliance and secondly the originally purchased appliance is seen almost as a loss leader to gain market share as well as having to compete against the competition. Proper money is made on the spares. Think how much a printer costs and then how much you have to pay for a replacement cartridge. If you need that cartridge for that printer you are a captive customer.

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2 hours ago, SpiderPig said:

Yes... and a professional will want to make a decent living too!    

 

 

Well yes of course and entirely fair.  Have no problem with paying the fee for an expert for their time.  But 100 euro for a kitchen tap which was dripping.   I remember putting new washers in dripping taps and they cost pennies and and did not need an expert.  But wonderful modern tap this was not possible.  I was not impressed by the whole theatrical thing the guy did, panting like an Olympian weightlifter unscrewing the old tap.  It was 200 Euro in the end.  They say it pays to stop a dripping tap, but really should have just kept on leaving bowl under tap and watering the plants with it.  

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41 minutes ago, Keleth said:

Who on here had a mum who didn`t have a tin full of buttons.

 

 

36 minutes ago, SpiderPig said:

I repair any torn clothing as long as its a Tear and not a hole due to wear and tear...   Buttons?? Yeah, I do them in my sleep!..

 

Re-sole shoes if its viable and I even clean mine and my daughters shoes!!     Who actually cleans/polishes their shoes these days?

 

In the past, I have just bought new fronts for my kitchen cupboards and flogged the old ones for a few shillings.. 

 

I am currently collecting Ikea Cupboard carcases for the Barn conversion when its ready for a kitchen... 

 

 

 

 

Sadly these skills are dying out.

 

Machines are doing everything now, and I see the next generation are just not interested. Maybe it is something new for Greta. Help against climate change, learn to repair things and sew.

 

Honestly not going to happen unless it involves money. Government will have to make it cheaper to repair things and more expensive to throw things away. Our current trend is throw it away, buy it new. Noone cares as long as they make profit. So the government will have to do something. People are in general lazy and apathetic, you can only make the majority care by effecting the one thing that they love the most. Money.

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10 minutes ago, French bean said:

Think how much a printer costs and then how much you have to pay for a replacement cartridge. If you need that cartridge for that printer you are a captive customer.

 

Yes, it's insane that sometimes the replacement cartridge costs almost the same as the new printer with a new cartridge.  Although before you buy the printer, you can check how much a replacement cartridge costs.  You can usually get generic brand cartridges cheap on ebay or you can get a refill kit. 

 

I've had my problems with inkjets in the past.  I don't print that much so it just seemed like every time I wanted to print, the ink had dried up and I had to buy a new cartridge.  When I moved to Germany 11 yrs. ago I decided to get a laser printer.  I've had to buy toner for it once before a few years ago and this past year I got toner again and a new drum, cost all of 20€. 

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I am a quilter and a knitter.  Quality textiles and yarns are expensive.  I make things for my grandkids to show my love, but I can tell you that it’s not cheap.  And it’s very time consuming.  So how can we expect people to do these things?  It used to be that people made things out of necessity. Now it is cheaper to buy ready made unfortunately. 
 

The vest I just gave the 3 year old is made from nice South American yarn (Malabrigo) that comes from a fair wage women’s cooperative that I really like supporting. The amount I need for that item costs me about $25.  Then it must be 15 or 20 hours of knitting time.  

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1 hour ago, French bean said:

You have to remember that companies will charge the earth for spares because first of all you need the item  - tends to be a distress purchase and people don't really go out and buy a replacement appliance and secondly the originally purchased appliance is seen almost as a loss leader to gain market share as well as having to compete against the competition. Proper money is made on the spares. Think how much a printer costs and then how much you have to pay for a replacement cartridge. If you need that cartridge for that printer you are a captive customer.

True! And also for a replacement printer! My printer broke down here on Crete , so I took it to town and the guy told me: " the replacement part costs about 5 euros and we have to order in Athens and it can take weeks."

 

Sod that for a lark. I bought a new one on the spot for 60 euros, including the initial cartridge.

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26 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

I am a quilter and a knitter.  Quality textiles and yarns are expensive. ....It used to be that people made things out of necessity.
 

 

I like doing patchwork when I have the time, and must say, I have an old-fashioned approach to it - I only used second-hand fabrics!

 

One project that I have on the go at the moment is a quilt made out of clothes that Shorty wore when she was a kid - interesting how many memories it brings back, and how excited she was at the whole idea!

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38 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

I am a quilter and a knitter.  Quality textiles and yarns are expensive.  I make things for my grandkids to show my love, but I can tell you that it’s not cheap.  And it’s very time consuming.  So how can we expect people to do these things?  It used to be that people made things out of necessity. Now it is cheaper to buy ready made unfortunately. 
 

The vest I just gave the 3 year old is made from nice South American yarn (Malabrigo) that comes from a fair wage women’s cooperative that I really like supporting. The amount I need for that item costs me about $25.  Then it must be 15 or 20 hours of knitting time.  

You like knitting etc..I like recalling my stories,,,,what do we have in common?

 

We both like a good yarn!

:P

(gets his (handmade ) coat!! )

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58 minutes ago, BethAnnBitt said:

I am a quilter and a knitter.  Quality textiles and yarns are expensive.  I make things for my grandkids to show my love, but I can tell you that it’s not cheap.  And it’s very time consuming.  So how can we expect people to do these things?  It used to be that people made things out of necessity. Now it is cheaper to buy ready made unfortunately. 
 

The vest I just gave the 3 year old is made from nice South American yarn (Malabrigo) that comes from a fair wage women’s cooperative that I really like supporting. The amount I need for that item costs me about $25.  Then it must be 15 or 20 hours of knitting time.  

 

how much would it cost to buy a high quality wool garment for a kid?  Not that most buy wool on purpose anymore but if you could find something in that direction, likely considerably more than $25.  I like Malabrigo too but I can say from experience their yarn ain't all that as it really doesn't hold up all that well.  

 

Anyway in a "traditional" scenario you'd knit one garment for a toddler, they'd grow out of it in a couple of months, then it would get passed onto the next kid who could use it over and over again.  It's cheaper to buy disposable, low quality goods, and I daresay many people like it like that as they get more opportunities for "ohhh - SHINY!" 

 

frankly I gave up knitting for kids (or even most adults) as people just toss it out.  Why bother?  

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3 hours ago, Anna66 said:

 

Good for you. Lots of people don't though.

 

What is really unbelievable is the amount of people nowadays who cannot sew. They just throw things away if they tear. We sew and repair everything.

 

Sadly though my children (who are now adults) are not interested or (were not interested) in learning how to repair things or sew. My partner he can repair things really well. We tried getting our kids to be interested but they just don't care. What can you do?

 

I was thinking about this today in the context of steampunk.

 

one thing I’d really like to try out this year is making some steampunk costumes and for that old “junk” is basically ideal.

 

at the communication museum they had a nice collection of electronic bits that I started making into a nice hat, but then I had to go deal with an emergency, apparently they expect parents to do that at kids’ parties, can you believe those priorities?

 

anyhow, what you really want is a permanent upcycling centre that does that kind of fun stuff to hook people in and generate some spare cash, and then also acts as a catalyst for the “serious” stuff - there should be an upcycling hub in every town and multiple in big cities

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31 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

how much would it cost to buy a high quality wool garment for a kid?  Not that most buy wool on purpose anymore but if you could find something in that direction, likely considerably more than $25.  I like Malabrigo too but I can say from experience their yarn ain't all that as it really doesn't hold up all that well.  

 

Anyway in a "traditional" scenario you'd knit one garment for a toddler, they'd grow out of it in a couple of months, then it would get passed onto the next kid who could use it over and over again.  It's cheaper to buy disposable, low quality goods, and I daresay many people like it like that as they get more opportunities for "ohhh - SHINY!" 

 

frankly I gave up knitting for kids (or even most adults) as people just toss it out.  Why bother?  

Well I hear you.  I do.  But the Malabrigo has held up very well for us.  The Malabrigo baby blanket is doing great for the new baby now.  My granddaughter finally outgrew her 2 vests from a year ago and they are in fine shape for her younger brother.  And she just got 2 new bigger ones.  There’s no outgrowing in a few months because I make things large enough for her to grow into without swimming in them.  
 

My DIL is Armenian and the culture values handmade goods and the effort put into them.  My granddaughter proudly announces to all that her vests and a sweater I made for her are from Oma.  I feel very blessed in that regard and it’s forging a connection for us.  Today my DIL showed me a picture from her childhood in a sweater knitted by her Armenian grandmother.

 

I‘m sorry that others have tossed away your work.  Their loss, as I‘m sure it was lovely.  What a pity that people devalue handmade gifts.  

 

 

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