WITH FINISHED IGCSEs, I have to go back to 9th grade in a Dusseldorf Gymnasium next year ??

23 posts in this topic

What I said about the Berufsschule is not entirely accurate, my apologies. The one we have does also do the Allgemeine Abitur. In order to take that at the Berufsschule, you needed an Erweitetesrealschulabschluss. From memory this includes 2 higher level courses and 2 foreign languages. 

 

Nouni, apart from the one really important thing of getting your German up to B2/C1 ASAP, I think you need to research the schools on offer here really carefully. The Berufsschule or the Gesamtschule may be the better options but you need to know exactly what they offer, what the precise entry requirements for the courses are, and how much of that your iGCSEs cover. It may be that there are very specific requirements that IGCSE simply didn't do, and there is little legal way round that at your age, or you may find that you easily qualify, and once your German is excellent, the world is your oyster. Either way, really research those schools (as well as the Gymnasium) and courses and make the best choice you can.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, kiplette said:

I think you need to research the schools on offer here really carefully.

In Bavaria the Department of education offers a "Schulberatungsstelle" in each district. These guys know all the different pathways and the respective requirements. At the time I found them helpful when we returned from overseas. Maybe there is an equivalent in your state? Also be aware that in Germany Abitur and university aren´t the only pathway to well paid jobs. Google "duales Studium" for instance. It´s a combination of studying (usually at a Fachhochschule) and training on the job.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

On 4.12.2019, 13:53:06, dstanners said:

Yes on both counts.

 

How long long did you attend a Gymansium? Which Klasse? Do you have a German Abi?

 

On 4.12.2019, 13:53:06, dstanners said:

The main point I had hoped to make in my response was that an extra year wouldn't hurt the OP. I hope that is the message that gets through.

 

It sounded as if you think the OP could theoretically reach native level fluency within a year.

 

On 4.12.2019, 13:53:06, dstanners said:

Still, if you think your comments of 1) blame your Dad and 2) your current level of German isn't good enough, are more helpful for a 15 year old first time poster, then I guess we can agree to disagree.

 

You are right, I couldn't think of anything positive to say at the time. On the other hand, do you really think that you are helping the OP by setting him up to fail?

 

On 4.12.2019, 13:22:55, Nouni said:

He came here for us. For our future. If you lived in the Middle East , you would know the struggle it is to be able to complete your tertiary education and find a job . There is no assistance for anybody to find a job there (IN THE MIDDLE EAST). There (M.E) I could have graduated next year and become jobless.

 

What I don't understand is why you assume that your prospects are better in Germany of all places?!?!?!?

 

On 4.12.2019, 13:34:49, Nouni said:

 

  • The schools here require B2 which I could have finished in Egypt in 3 months maximum. So i assume that an intensive course here is also in that range

 

I think you are basing your plans on many false assumptions and this is the biggest one.

 

It is highly unlikely that you could reach B2 within 3 months in the German school system. Although education is Ländersache, all Länder face a shortage of teachers and support staff. The standard solution in Germany to deal with the mass migration of school age children who can't speak German is to group the children by approximate age without assessing prior education. If you end up with a mixed group of students, some of whom are even illiterate in their own language and most who do know how to write the Latin alphabet, you will end up learning the German alphabet first. Granted this is a waste of time for someone like you who already knows how to write in English, however, German bureaucracy tends to have difficulty thinking outside the box and generally opts for one size fits all solutions (even if they don't fit anyone).

 

On the other hand, the adult German classes generally won't take children under 16 under any circumstances and will only take children 16 -18 under special circumstances (including permission from the school board). The intensive accelerated German courses for foreign students who want to study here would be a better fit for you, but you are too young for them.

 

On 4.12.2019, 13:34:49, Nouni said:
  • I was going to go to 11th grade this year in the UAE a year earlier than Germans and graduate next year 
  • Now the plan is , I'm learning German this year and going to grade 9 next year!

 

I think your best option would be one of these two schools:

 

https://www.isdedu.de/teaching-learning/international-baccalaureate/

https://www.stgeorgesschool.com/duisburg-duesseldorf

 

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now