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Working (and Anmeldung) in Germany with Residence Permit from other EU country

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I am a Russian citizen who has been living in Italy for more than 8 years.

Currently, I am in possession of a long term Italian Residence Permit which should grant me access to live and work in most EU countries.

 

I would like to move to Germany at some point, but there are a few obstacles in my way. 

 

Problem #1

The name on my Passport does not match the name on my Residence Permit. Will the Council Office check my Residence Permit when I do the Anmeldung? If so, which name will they use for the Anmeldung (passport name/residence permit name)?

 

Problem #2

I have applied for Italian Citizenship as I have been adopted in Italy and lived there for 5+ years. The thing is that in Italy things notoriously take forever: I have been told that it could take up to 4 years for them to grant me citizenship meanwhile I have to remain resident in the Italian territory. 

I spoke with the Italian Consulate in Berlin who advised me that I might be able to transfer my "working domicile" (literal translation) to Germany and that should do as my residence in Italy will still valid.

Does anyone know anything about this? Would this mean that I still do the Anmeldung but then declare my income in Italy?

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10 minutes ago, natistark said:

...

Problem #1

The name on my Passport does not match the name on my Residence Permit. Will the Council Office check my Residence Permit when I do the Anmeldung? If so, which name will they use for the Anmeldung (passport name/residence permit name)?

 

This is Germany.  Best to fix the problem before you come here!

 

 

10 minutes ago, natistark said:

Problem #2

I have applied for Italian Citizenship as I have been adopted in Italy and lived there for 5+ years. The thing is that in Italy things notoriously take forever: I have been told that it could take up to 4 years for them to grant me citizenship meanwhile I have to remain resident in the Italian territory. 

I spoke with the Italian Consulate in Berlin who advised me that I might be able to transfer my "working domicile" (literal translation) to Germany and that should do as my residence in Italy will still valid.

Does anyone know anything about this? Would this mean that I still do the Anmeldung but then declare my income in Italy?

 

 

If you register in Germany then you will be considered tax resident here and be expected to pay tax in Germany on your worldwide income.  So it doesn't matter where the money is earned, Germany would want at least a share of the tax (depending on the individual tax agreements between countries).  Even if you maintain a residence in Italy.  In fact, you might make things more complex for yourself.

 

To be honest, you might not want to hear it, but I would suggest that you wait until you get your Italian citizenship and then you can move.  

As it is Italy, maybe there are "ways to expedite the process"?

 

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The visa you have - which is called Soggiornante di lungo periodo-CE in Italy and Daueraufenthalt-EU in Germany - merely affords you the right to establish residency in Germany, provided you can pay for your own upkeep. However, it does not exempt you from the requirement to get an employment visa, including going through the Vorrangprüfung that proves that no EU citizen is available to take the job you're applying for (if applicable). In other words, it does not give you the right to work in Germany that you imagine it does.

 

To earn that right, you'll have to wait until your Italian citizenship application is granted. Only then will you have the full freedom of movement that EU citizens enjoy.

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4 hours ago, El Jeffo said:

The visa you have - which is called Soggiornante di lungo periodo-CE in Italy and Daueraufenthalt-EU in Germany - merely affords you the right to establish residency in Germany, provided you can pay for your own upkeep. However, it does not exempt you from the requirement to get an employment visa, including going through the Vorrangprüfung that proves that no EU citizen is available to take the job you're applying for (if applicable). In other words, it does not give you the right to work in Germany that you imagine it does.

 

To earn that right, you'll have to wait until your Italian citizenship application is granted. Only then will you have the full freedom of movement that EU citizens enjoy.

 

Thanks! Well, that at least puts this whole idea to rest :)
I guess the only thing left to do now is to buy a few cases of Prosecco and send them to the right people :ph34r::D

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6 hours ago, natistark said:

 

I am a Russian citizen who has been living in Italy for more than 8 years.

Currently, I am in possession of a long term Italian Residence Permit which should grant me access to live and work in most EU countries.

 

I would like to move to Germany at some point, but there are a few obstacles in my way.


I've got to ask. Why would you want to move to Germany? :blink:

 

The food, the wine, and the weather are all better in Italy. Italian is also much easier on the ears than German. 

 

I live in Germany and would love to move to Italy (unfortunately I don't speak any Italian nor have skills that would be needed in Italy).

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, engelchen said:


I've got to ask. Why would you want to move to Germany? :blink:

 

The food, the wine, and the weather are all better in Italy. Italian is also much easier on the ears than German. 

 

I live in Germany and would love to move to Italy (unfortunately I don't speak any Italian nor have skills that would be needed in Italy).

 

 

 

Italy is great for holidays, but to live here... people who were born here probably can accept all of its downsides (e.g. how impossible it is to find a decent job, unless you have "connections").
Plus, Germany is where my boyfriend lives :wub:

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11 hours ago, natistark said:

people who were born here probably can accept all of its downsides (e.g. how impossible it is to find a decent job, unless you have "connections").

 

Unless you have technical skills required in Germany, the same thing usually applies here.

 

11 hours ago, natistark said:

Plus, Germany is where my boyfriend lives :wub:

 

There is then always marriage (however, I would still opt for Italian citizenship before moving).

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

There is then always marriage (however, I would still opt for Italian citizenship before moving).

 

Agree! :P We'll just wait whatever it takes

@El Jeffo
I don't want to call int doubt what you said, but the strange thing is that reading the information for the type of residence permit that I have really stated that it allows for working in other EU countries. So is it the case that individual EU countries can decide whether to accept this type of permit also for work rather than just estabilishing residency? And this is the case of Germany that still requires going through Vorrangprüfung?
At this stage I am accepting things as you stated, but I am simply curious.

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On 26.11.2019, 11:04:29, natistark said:

And this is the case of Germany that still requires going through Vorrangprüfung?

 

Why are you worried about the Vorrangprüfung?

 

What did you study? In which field/industry do you work?

 

On 25.11.2019, 21:28:04, natistark said:

 (e.g. how impossible it is to find a decent job, unless you have "connections").

 

If you don't have the technical skills to pass the Vorrangprüfung, then your chances of finding a decent job here are rather low.

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On 27/11/2019, 16:11:23, engelchen said:

 

Why are you worried about the Vorrangprüfung?

 

What did you study? In which field/industry do you work?

I am worried because I hate bureacracy :)

 

Anyway, I have a Bachelor degree in Economics, a Bachelor degree in Communication Studies and just recently finished my Master's degree in Film Making.
What else do they ask for, apart from one's studies?

 

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Actually - I am definitely going off topic here, but not sure which topic to post on to - my grandmother was a German-Russian. So I am wondering if I might not have a chance to try getting German citizenship by descent. I have never really looked into it much as I have been afraid to hold my breath on it.

 

  • My dad was born in 1964 and was a Russian citizen, although his Russian birth certificate states that he also had German nationality.
  • My dad's father never recognised him, and, in fact, only his mother's name shows up on his certificate as they were not married.
  • My dad's mother too was a Russian citizen with German nationality. She was born in 1933 but haven't been able to find her birth certificate.


My confusion is on why on a Russian birth certificate, it is also stated "German nationality" and does this have any legal value under German law?
Does anyone know if there is a chance to be able to claim German citizenship on these grounds?

 

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