Tesla Gigafactories, News and Conversation

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15 hours ago, catjones said:

In today's NYT.  I'm trying to imagine this woman doing this in Germany, but I can't on so many levels.  Education, experience, guts, risk, investment and nursing; yet it takes all these to succeed.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/23/business/lynn-jurich-sunrun.html?action=click&module=Editors%20Picks&pgtype=Homepage

I always said that if Musk were to be born in Germany, he would today be an engineer forgotten in a corner of some deeply boring German company. There is no risk culture in central Europe. In Portugal there is much more risk culture than Germany, for example.But not nearly as much as in America.

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Musk would have left Germany like 400000 other well educated Germans did last year.

On the other hand, they are replaced by the same number (and more) of specialists from the Middle East.

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55 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

I always said that if Musk were to be born in Germany, he would today be an engineer forgotten in a corner of some deeply boring German company.

How can somebody who's not an engineer become an "engineer forgotten in a corner"? :-)

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7 minutes ago, franklan said:

How can somebody who's not an engineer become an "engineer forgotten in a corner"? :-)

 

Anything and everything happens in "melgaLand"...

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1 hour ago, franklan said:

How can somebody who's not an engineer become an "engineer forgotten in a corner"? :-)

If there is something that I´ve learn over the years is that being an engineer is unrelated with a degree. Either you are born an engineer or you are not. Musk has clearly an engineer mindset and if he would be born here, my best guess is that he would eventually take an engineer job.

And his first shot at university degree was an engineering course, which he abandoned when moving to Canada.

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5 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

If there is something that I´ve learn over the years is that being an engineer is unrelated with a degree.

 

That's normally what people without a degree say. 

 

P.S., Like the ones saying "Size doesn't matter".

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Just now, Krieg said:

That's normally what people without a degree say. 

I have one and I have worked with many who don´t and that I trust much more than others that have.

I could do my current job without any degree. Not saying that university is not needed, far from it, but as they used to tell us at engineering faculty, "we are only here to teach you how to learn by yourself". And that is the essence of engineering.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

Either you are born an engineer or you are not

You have to find somebody to hire you on a engineer position eventhough you're not an engineer. That is a problem in Germany, yes.

 

If you had the luck to have the wonga to hire yourself as an engineer in your own company eventhough you're not an engineer, things look different, yes.

 

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1 hour ago, franklan said:

You have to find somebody to hire you on a engineer position eventhough you're not an engineer. That is a problem in Germany, yes.

I have several colleagues in SW and electronics that have no degree in my German company. It is harder, but doable.

One of them rose up to middle management already.

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It depends, pure empiric people might develop some very good skills, that's obvious.  But plenty of them are only good in what they have been worked on, they might miss some general knowledge of other things because you have never done it before.  A person with a degree and similar experience might have a more rounded profile and might know a bunch of other things even if there were not yet applied in real life, just knowing those concepts exists put them in an advantage.

 

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44 minutes ago, Krieg said:

It depends, pure empiric people might develop some very good skills, that's obvious.  But plenty of them are only good in what they have been worked on, they might miss some general knowledge of other things because you have never done it before.  A person with a degree and similar experience might have a more rounded profile and might know a bunch of other things even if there were not yet applied in real life, just knowing those concepts exists put them in an advantage.

 

For me that is the difference between a SW developer and an engineer. An engineer can learn by itself but many SW developers are not engineers by nature (not by degree), so they cannot learn new tricks by themselves.

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1 minute ago, MikeMelga said:

For me that is the difference between a SW developer and an engineer. An engineer can learn by itself but many SW developers are not engineers by nature (not by degree), so they cannot learn new tricks by themselves.

 

Not really what I am talking about.   I am talking about the roundness that gives you having a degree, you will learn a bunch of things that you might or might not use later on.

 

If you tell a person "Build an A", the empiric would build an A based of his experience.  The person with formal education might know that there is some basic design/implementation/optimization/process/whatever that might allow you to do a nicer A.   While both As are As, there is a chance the one from the person with formal education would be somehow better.    Or not.

 

It is like you tell an empiric developer to do some program that involves designing a small database.  The empiric developer might have used databases before but never designed one himself and doesn't know in which cases a normalized database is a better solution and in which ones it is not.  Or maybe doesn't even know what normalisation is.  The person with former education might know it because it is one of the hundreds of things learnt in the uni even if he never designed a database before in his work life.

 

I have known several of those truly empiric geniuses, but sometimes their solutions, while work, have holes.  And because they are truly geniuses they do not listen because the advice to close the obvious holes comes from an inexperienced student doing his Praktikum.

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12 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

I always said that if Musk were to be born in Germany, he would today be an engineer forgotten in a corner of some deeply boring German company. There is no risk culture in central Europe. In Portugal there is much more risk culture than Germany, for example.But not nearly as much as in America.

Not sure about risk, but Germany is innovative.  https://www.manager-magazin.de/unternehmen/artikel/bloomberg-innovation-index-deutschland-vor-suedkorea-innovativste-nation-a-1304197.html

 

Just not in fields (such as industrial machinery) that most people come into daily contact with. 

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10 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

Being innovative is not enough nowadays. You need to take risks, as the market will not wait for a normal development cycle.

 

Your blanket statements are extremely funny when you have experience in segments that are not as dynamic as the ones uninformed people know as "technology".

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10 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

Being innovative is not enough nowadays. You need to take risks, as the market will not wait for a normal development cycle.

Yes, according to studies, Germany is the worst of 30 countries for risk tolerance.   https://bibliothek.wzb.eu/pdf/2012/ii12-401.pdf   However, other developed countries do not do very well in that category either.  Developing countries (like South Africa?) are much less risk averse.  Interestingly, though, within a country, the wealthier are more willing to take risks than the poor.

 

I think the US is seen as "risk taking" because of the large number of immigrants (like Elon Musk) who are willing to take risks, but the native population isn't much better than the Germans.    

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26 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

Your blanket statements are extremely funny when you have experience in segments that are not as dynamic as the ones uninformed people know as "technology".

I work in the fastest changing business market in the world. Innovation cycles are shorter than 1 year.

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2 minutes ago, MikeMelga said:

I work in the fastest changing business market in the world. Innovation cycles are shorter than 1 year.

 

Go on then... tell us what you do...   Do you swop tyres on F1 cars??   

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