Tesla Gigafactories, News and Conversation

2,983 posts in this topic

26 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

Aren't there labor laws for that sort of thing?

 

My union experience. I joined a union to get a job as a carpenter's apprentice when I was young. I just thought that paying $30 a month for a very good earning job was a fair trade. I had to work full time for 4 years to top out as a carpenter. That required going to school 2 evenings a week after work. The union paid for that. I never got involved with the politics. I was making more money than my university educated peers (as an apprentice) and I had a child to feed and care for. 

 

That was a long, long time ago. I imagine things are different now.

yes of course there are laws for that kind of thing

 

But I know people who lose out, for example a friends brother was working helping install satellite dishes etc, on several days of more than 10 days, the boss said we will just install one more dish, he said hey, I am only here for 8 hours a day, that's what you pay me for, the boss turned around and said, look do you want this job or not, meaning if he did not want to do it, the boss would kick him out as a temporary worker.

 

In a more professional environment, I know people who worked writing software, that was behind schedule, most people put in a lot of free overtime, if you went to get your jacket at 4pm, everybody would look at you as you left the office.

 

Both examples were in Germany 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, catjones said:

 

In my non-union world, the market and my performance determined pay and benefits.  Amongst my peers, most leave a company not because of pay, but because of culture and opportunity.  If your skills are in demand, you'll be paid accordingly.  If your skills are limited, you'll also be paid accordingly.

In general, labor unions are far away from their "collective bargaining" ideals of the past and now survive off of fear and tradition.  They do have a religious-like following with dues (tithing) and bosses (priests) showing the faithful the true light.  Many of the flock (Keleth et. al.) worship at the altar of security, while the unwashed heathens (myself) do fine without unions.

 

Sure ther are differnt types of working environment, if you have good skills and good at your job you need less protection, people in jobs that do not require skill or a job anybody can do, maybe need more protection from unions, as the boss knows he/she can kick out these people more easy and get a replacement, so he/she can treat there employees like shit.

 

As normal everything depends...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My personal experience of a few companies is that if the staff feel valued and fairly treated then there is no interest in being in a union. Where people feel pressured, under valued and not respected then the unions are very well represented. One international employer I worked for was happy for Union representation for the work force but they were very much a firm that were very zealous when using disciplinary procedures. You could argue that it was in their favour to ensure things were done properly with union cooperation to prevent being called constantly to employment tribunals.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, catjones said:

 

In my non-union world, the market and my performance determined pay and benefits.  Amongst my peers, most leave a company not because of pay, but because of culture and opportunity.  If your skills are in demand, you'll be paid accordingly.  If your skills are limited, you'll also be paid accordingly.

In general, labor unions are far away from their "collective bargaining" ideals of the past and now survive off of fear and tradition.  They do have a religious-like following with dues (tithing) and bosses (priests) showing the faithful the true light.  Many of the flock (Keleth et. al.) worship at the altar of security, while the unwashed heathens (myself) do fine without unions.

 

And we have the first "fuck you,I´m alright Jack" answer.

 

33 minutes ago, yesterday said:

Sure ther are differnt types of working environment, if you have good skills and good at your job you need less protection, people in jobs that do not require skill or a job anybody can do, maybe need more protection from unions, as the boss knows he/she can kick out these people more easy and get a replacement, so he/she can treat there employees like shit.

 

As normal everything depends...

 

MM stated somewhere that the gaming industry is where many programmers wanted to be.

Perhaps people should take a look at what is happening at Activision,Bethesda (2 of the biggest and most respected game companies) among others in regards to people wanting to unionise before thinking if you have the skills you will be respected and treated fairly by your employers.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Keleth said:

And we have the first "fuck you,I´m alright Jack" answer.

 

as usual, you don't know what you're talking about; a result of poor reading comprehension and a misguided thought process.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, catjones said:

 

as usual, you don't know what you're talking about; a result of poor reading comprehension and a misguided thought process.

I know exactly what you mean and because the attitude of me first is so deeply ingrained in you you basically don´t care about anyone else.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, yesterday said:

Another big step forward for self driving, in Paris with a model 3

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-59647069

More bullshit? There was no self driving involved. FSD beta is restricted to US and Canada.

 

Again one more claim that the "vehicle accelerated by himself", which has been proven FALSE many times (127 times!), here is an example:

https://electrek.co/2021/01/08/tesla-incidents-accelerating-by-themselves-driver-wrong-pedal-nhtsa/

 

By the way, I had a "wrong pedal" accident when I had my license for a few days, back in the 1990's. Unfortunately I was unable to blame the car.

 

Can Autopilot accelerate? Yes, but a simple press on the break stops it immediately. So let's cut the bullshit until investigation ends.

And my 2003 Renault Laguna did rev up and accelerate by himself, really dangerous, but never made it to the news.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/12/2021, 09:59:55, MikeMelga said:

By the way, I had a "wrong pedal" accident when I had my license for a few days, back in the 1990's. Unfortunately I was unable to blame the car.

Just a question on that;- 

I learnt to drive with a a manual, i.e left foot clutch and right foot accelerator and brake but my first experience of an automatic was a rental in the USA and I found it completely natural to use the left foot for braking [perhaps because I had ridden old British and Italian motorbikes for many years( left foot back brake)] but I never understood why that was considered such a no no, given that it would pretty much avoid the classic wrong pedal accident.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, keith2011 said:

Just a question on that;- 

I learnt to drive with a a manual, i.e left foot clutch and right foot accelerator and brake but my first experience of an automatic was a rental in the USA and I found it completely natural to use the left foot for braking [perhaps because I had ridden old British and Italian motorbikes for many years( left foot back brake)] but I never understood why that was considered such a no no, given that it would pretty much avoid the classic wrong pedal accident.

 

because, under an emergency situation, you could hit both pedals at the same time, but the gas would overtake the brake and make stopping longer, not shorter.

I've seen drivers resting their left foot on the brake pedal.  brake lights are on and the pads are just under constant (albeit light) pressure.

in automatics, keep your left foot off any pedals all the time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, catjones said:

because, under an emergency situation, you could hit both pedals at the same time, but the gas would overtake the brake and make stopping longer, not shorter.

Why would I hit both pedals at the same time, particularly if left foot braking in an automatic were taught? I have never wound up the accelerator in an emergency on a motorbike or indeed pressed on the gear change with my right foot! On the other hand it is quite obvious that were I to accidentally press the accelerator instead of the brake on an automatic then the problem typically becomes compounded by pressing even harder on the wrong pedal and racing into a wall or garage door at high speed!:wacko:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, keith2011 said:

Why would I hit both pedals at the same time...

The point about a moment of confusion in the heat of battle is that there is no logic. But it happens anyway. It is why accidents happen. Inexplicable human error.

 

See the unhappy thread.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, optimista said:

The point about a moment of confusion in the heat of battle is that there is no logic. But it happens anyway. It is why accidents happen. Inexplicable human error.

 

See the unhappy thread.

 

Absolutely agree but I just think it is more likely to accidentally press the wrong pedal with the right foot and potentially more dangerous than pressing both pedals at the same time with both feet!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You ll only find out if it actually comes to pass. Let s hope it remains just a theoretical discussion.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, keith2011 said:

Just a question on that;- 

I learnt to drive with a a manual, i.e left foot clutch and right foot accelerator and brake but my first experience of an automatic was a rental in the USA and I found it completely natural to use the left foot for braking [perhaps because I had ridden old British and Italian motorbikes for many years( left foot back brake)] but I never understood why that was considered such a no no, given that it would pretty much avoid the classic wrong pedal accident.

Because you could step on both and have many other types of accidents. Stepping on both at the same time can make you lose control very quickly.

In my case, my inexperience meant I picked the wrong pedal, car didn't slow down, so I just pressed it harder!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Catastrophe said:

Tesla has lost the race it seems:
"The German manufacturer is the first automotive company in the world to meet the demanding legal requirements of UN-R157 for a Level 3 system..."
https://www.fleetnews.co.uk/news/manufacturer-news/2021/12/09/mercedes-benz-self-driving-car-technology-approved-for-use

Hummmm... no... that's typical anti-Tesla bullshit. Nobody wants to meet that requirement because it's useless and brings in a lot of responsibility.

That legal requirement is a trap set by German and Japanese manufacturers against Tesla, Waymo and others. They want to cripple level 3 systems to the point they become useless.One example is that it limits the system to 60km/h on the highway, and only if the road fulfills some other requirements. This means it's useless 95% of the time. Tesla and others prefer to say they have a Level 2 system that does much more than the one from Mercedes.

Mercedes is at least 5 years behind Tesla on self driving.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I learned to drive it was an automatic. Rule #1 - left foot stays on floor. You never press any pedal with it. It is an ingrained habit that I've never broken.

 

I can also drive manual but only if I have to. I don't like it.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

When I learned to drive it was an automatic. Rule #1 - left foot stays on floor. You never press any pedal with it. It is an ingrained habit that I've never broken.

 

When I attended driver's education in high school in the early 70's, all of the cars had an automatic transmission.  The only purpose for the left foot was to set the parking/emergency brake if it was the pedal type, and to switch the high beam lights on and off.  Some of the cars had handles under the dash to pull out for the parking brake, but all had the foot-operated high beam switch.

 

I was no different than most of the boys in school at the time and had grown up on working farms, so driving vehicles with manual transmissions was not a problem.  The first vehicle with a manual transmission I routinely drove at the tender age of 10 was a 1940 Ford 9N tractor.  As soon as I was able to reach the clutch and brake pedals, I worked the fields on my own.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, JG52 said:

but all had the foot-operated high beam switch.

 

I do remember that on my dads first car, an early 50s Ford but I think by the mid 60s or even earlier the dip switch was on the steering column here in Europe, certainly none of the cars I have driven had it on the floor.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now