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Calling all Sociology grads...

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Hey everyone, back on this forum after a few years hiatus and have a question for those who have completed a degree in Sociology here in Germany and have successfully gotten a work permit for this field. 

 

A bit about me: I finally got my MA at the JLU in Gießen in "Gesellschaft und Kulturen der Moderne" (TLDR: Sociology) and am about 4 months into my "Arbeitssuche nach dem Studium" visa. While I was doing my masters I got approval from the Ausländerbehörde to take on a freelance position at a Verein for teaching German to refugees and have been working there for nearly 2 years now. Since then the position has evolved beyond just DAF and now I also have a class that focuses on job searching, writing CVs, and preparing cover letters. The coordinators of this class (and I) are trying to convince our boss to get me off Honorarbasis and get me a normal working contract because they need someone who can call companies in the area to arrange internships for the participants, constantly file/update CV info, and keep track of work experience the participants are gaining. 

I love my job (but screw Honorarbasis), but my career goal is to work with/for international university students, particularly something at an akademisches Auslandsamt. I've already done 2 internships at international offices and also went on a DAAD ISAP exchange while doing my MA...yada yada. Experience is plentiful. I recently applied for a 75% position at an international office at a Uni here in Germany which deals with advising guest researchers, assisting with scholarships, promoting the Uni, etc. It's essentially my dream job and they want someone to start after the new year. 

So to the main question: do you think that either of these jobs would be approved by the Ausländerbehörde for a work permit? If I'm offered a normal contract where I currently work it's definitely my plan B in case it doesn't work out with the intl. office. I feel like Soc. is such an insane field to evaluate since what we study/studied is enmeshed with such a broad range of fields...  

 

TLDR: For sociology grads who have a work permit, what do you do now and how easy/difficult was it do get a work permit? 

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On 11/7/2019, 10:05:31, wickl087 said:

So to the main question: do you think that either of these jobs would be approved by the Ausländerbehörde for a work permit? 

 

With regard to the international office job. The mail question is actually: Do YOU think that you would be approved for a work permit?

 

If you are applying for an advisory role supporting scientists not students, then the university would be paying you to answer exactly the question you are asking us.

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13 hours ago, vaonba said:

How's the salary? Does it fulfill the blue card minimum?


Unfortunately, neither of them are blue card minimum. It's TV-H 13, though based on experience I've gained over the years there's a chance I could get put into Stufe 2 if hired. 

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11 hours ago, Kommentarlos said:

 

With regard to the international office job. The mail question is actually: Do YOU think that you would be approved for a work permit?

This question is pointless. Did you study sociology or did you just post to post? 

 

11 hours ago, Kommentarlos said:

 

If you are applying for an advisory role supporting scientists not students, then the university would be paying you to answer exactly the question you are asking us.

How did you conclude that I would be only be advising scientists? I clearly wrote guest researchers in my post. That covers a broad range of fields.

As an advisor at an international office, it absolutely would not my job to take on the role of Ausländerbehörde and determine if a particular students' job contract would lead to a work permit or blue card or not. That's the job of the Ausländerbehörde and why officials there are required to study German immigration law to work there. Also, the job I applied doesn't solely entail giving guest researchers advice on work permits. smdh.

I'm particularly calling on other sociologists to see what type of work has already been approved of or not to better gauge the job I have now as well as the one I just applied for.

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On 11/7/2019, 10:05:31, wickl087 said:

So to the main question: do you think that either of these jobs would be approved by the Ausländerbehörde for a work permit?

 

No.

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1 minute ago, lisa13 said:

 

nono.  worse.  put it on ignore :)

 

:lol:

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ok so I am not an expert in sociology nor work permits, BUT I can suggest this:

 

have your current and/or prospective employers contact the abh and see if they can pull some strings on the permit.  As an employer they can make the case that you have skills that they simply have not been able to find with any German or EU citizen applicants thus far which *may* give you a leg up.  Your current employer would be in a better position to do this since they can show you have already been working for them for some time, and it would obviously be a hardship for them to train someone new when you already know the ropes. Maybe the "better" employer could come up with some rationalization as well if they really want to hire you.

 

Note this advice is based on my experiences with work permits in 2011 so things may have changed, but at that time I was able to secure a permit with lightning speed directly through my prospective employer.  I didn't have to do jack aside from go to the abh after arriving in Germany to pick up my permits.  Granted I am in IT (which is officially designated as a field with a lack of German/EU workers) and had the blue card existed at the time I might have made the salary requirement too, but the point is, the employer has a lot more options to sway the abh than you do.  If I had applied for the permit myself it would have taken months yet my employer had it secured for me in a few weeks.  Another company that wanted to hire me said they had the approval process down to two weeks.  Huge difference if the employer is involved.

 

it's a long shot, don't kid yourself, but I think it could be worth exploring.

 

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1 hour ago, lisa13 said:

ok so I am not an expert in sociology nor work permits, BUT I can suggest this:

 

have your current and/or prospective employers contact the abh and see if they can pull some strings on the permit.  As an employer they can make the case that you have skills that they simply have not been able to find with any German or EU citizen applicants thus far which *may* give you a leg up.  Your current employer would be in a better position to do this since they can show you have already been working for them for some time, and it would obviously be a hardship for them to train someone new when you already know the ropes. Maybe the "better" employer could come up with some rationalization as well if they really want to hire you.

 

Note this advice is based on my experiences with work permits in 2011 so things may have changed, but at that time I was able to secure a permit with lightning speed directly through my prospective employer.  I didn't have to do jack aside from go to the abh after arriving in Germany to pick up my permits.  Granted I am in IT (which is officially designated as a field with a lack of German/EU workers) and had the blue card existed at the time I might have made the salary requirement too, but the point is, the employer has a lot more options to sway the abh than you do.  If I had applied for the permit myself it would have taken months yet my employer had it secured for me in a few weeks.  Another company that wanted to hire me said they had the approval process down to two weeks.  Huge difference if the employer is involved.

 

it's a long shot, don't kid yourself, but I think it could be worth exploring.

 


Ooh, nothing is at all set in stone yet. I'm still Honorarkraft where I work now and haven't officially been offered a new contract, though from what I hear, the coordinators of one of the classes I'm giving now are trying to pull some strings for me. I've been in contact with one of the head ups myself since probably July now... Back then there weren't any open positions nor the need that they have now in this class. 

As far as the job I just applied for at the international office, this is also still very much open. I'm just hoping to snag an interview this time around since I could actually give them my diploma and final grades. 

I've actually been able to persuade the Ausländerbehörde by myself, which is how I've been able to keep teaching German where I work now. When I first started working there, I took a huge risk by not telling them I took on a freelance position while I was studying and had already been working for about 7 months by the time I had to renew my residency permit. When it came time to renew for my last semester, I just brought snippets of the requirements for freelance visas and argued that the job I'm doing is helping the local economy... because... yeah, teaching refugees German haha. Bonn approved it immediately. 

I'm mostly worried that the Ausländerbehörde will say something like "oh, but your job description doesn't have the word sociology anywhere in it, therefore it's not in your field". You do make a good point though. if the Ausländerbehörde tries to tell me that one of these jobs isn't in "sociology", I'll just give them a quick lesson in sociology while I'm there. Skills and experience outside of my studies will definitely help in my argument. I could also imagine that both employers would help, if need be, since both have close ties to the Ausländerbehörde. 

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