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Scammed on eBay

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Hey guys,

I am an Ebay_de user since 2015. I ordered many items form Eaby with bank transfer everything was going fine. I usually see the eBay seller reviews before transferring money if he/she accepts money only by bank transfer. With the trust of my 5 years, I transferred money for a MacBook for 1450€ before transfer I talked to the seller she spoke very well on eBay and her reviews were positive with around 15 stars (I have 18 stars). 

After transferring of money now she deregistered from eBay. I reported to eBay but no use and I contacted the bank but they told me it's not possible to revert my transaction. I don't know what to do now.

I have her full name and bank details.  Searching her name in Google I got a profile on 'StayFriends powered by t-online.de'. with the same city where eBay seller was but not sure if it was her.

Is it possible to approach the police ? 

Any suggestions that would help me.

 

Thank you

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Either s/he was playing a long con or the account was hijacked, which means the "seller" is as much a victim as you were. Offering (or even buying) a few low-priced items to get your reputation score above 10 (and 15 isn't anywhere near what you should consider a "trusted" account) is a well-known method for making accounts seem trustworthy.

 

eBay won't be any help, because they know their system is totally open to fraud and scammers. They still get their commission no matter what. The police will take your report, but they won't be able to commit a lot of resources to investigating. It's very likely that the person you sent the money to has already sent the money to someone else, minus a 10% commission - the "payment processor" scam is also very well known. So they might get busted as an accessory to fraud, but you still won't get your money back.

 

Next time, if you insist on buying something on eBay, pay by PayPal. That way you at least have some recourse if you get ripped off. And don't just check their eBay rating - actually look at their profile and see what they got the ratings for. An account that has bought or sold 10-15 low-priced items and then suddenly offers expensive computer equipment should be immediately suspect.

 

Sorry you had to learn this lesson the hard way.

 

P.S. I took the liberty of moving your post to "Legal". You posted it under the classified ads.

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6 hours ago, El Jeffo said:

 

eBay won't be any help, because they know their system is totally open to fraud and scammers. They still get their commission no matter what. The police will take your report, but they won't be able to commit a lot of resources to investigating. It's very likely that the person you sent the money to has already sent the money to someone else, minus a 10% commission - the "payment processor" scam is also very well known. So they might get busted as an accessory to fraud, but you still won't get your money back.

 

Sorry I can´t let that stand.

Two years back and I had spent almost six years as online moderator for E-Bay on the lovely island of Malta, one of over 160 agents who tried on three shifts, seven days a week and 52 weeks a year to protect people from fraud. We tried our best and most agents were able to scan 1500 to 2000 inserts an hour.

You can do the math if you want.

Most scams are easy to spot for a trained eye and those that were suspect were forwarded to a higher level of scrutiny. However with the sheer volume of inserts a lot inevitably got through. But we protected a lot of people from scammers, fraudsters and downright evil people. People who had no qualms selling children for sex on E-Bay and I so want to forget what I know about German sexual fetishes. Nazi items right down to one insert selling the skull of a "Original Nazi soldier" with dog-tag and certificate, it would have set you back by 1500 Euros.

One woman selling her six year old daughter somewhere in Frankfurt, in these cases we inform the police, we later learned that the child had been saved and is now in care.

Car frauds.

House frauds.

DTW´s (Damen wäsche träger)

Tupperware frauds.

And a big one, Thermomix frauds.

In short anything that people will buy will be target of fraudsters.

The main thing you need to be aware about is: "The better the bargain, the more likely a fraud."

E-bay spends a lot of effort in fraud prevention and I was on the front line, at least for a while.

 

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Kudos to you and your dedication, slammer, but eBay sure did their best - and ultimately succeeded - in neutering the volunteer security community that tracked and monitored shill bidding, accounts that had just crossed the "trusted" ten-star threshold and suddenly began selling expensive electronic items by the dozen, and other obviously fraudulent activity.


It started with anonymizing bidders, which made it impossible to identify shill bidding, and only went downhill from there. Higher prices = higher eBay commissions, so there's an obvious conflict of interest there between lawfulness and profit maximization. 

 

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DTW - what is this? Sounds like people who wear other people's dirty underwear for kicks, which is gross, I grant you, but why fraudulent?

 

I did google it, but I am assuming Dynamic Time Warping is legit ;)

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I think he is making the point that he has seen it all and wished he hadn't. Fetishes and child sex sales would not be classed as fraudulent either. Just bloody unpleasant if not the stuff to keep you awake at night. You can't untoll the bell.

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1 hour ago, kiplette said:

DTW - what is this? Sounds like people who wear other people's dirty underwear for kicks, which is gross, I grant you, but why fraudulent?

 

I did google it, but I am assuming Dynamic Time Warping is legit ;)

Yes it´s that, but it is a rather sanitized (internal) term for what is even grosser than you can...possibly imagine, and I really mean it.

True, that in it´self is not fraudulent but it is in the scope of what we screened for and yes indeed there are scammers preying on men wanting to buy dirty female undergarments (I´ll spare the details or you won´t want your lunch) It´s one of the better scams for the scammer as the DTW won´t make too much of a fuss if scammed, understandably.

Thank you for that assessment Optimista, you are correct and it is one of the reasons that there is such a high turnover of agents, most are younger persons looking for adventure in a foreign country or students on break or like me, older farts with nowhere else to go.

Six months was considered a good run.

 

There are lighter moments though, I once kicked out an apparent sex-toy only to be hauled over the coals by the seller selling a high-tec gel filled bicycle saddle.

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I thought if you pay by Credit card, you can recall the payment within 4 weeks of paying it, even with free Credit cards.

called charge back.

 

If you pay for a Credit card, there are further benefits.

 

by the way sorry you had that back luck

 

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