Even after all these years, I still...

324 posts in this topic

On 10/31/2019, 5:21:19, Tap said:

...I still can't pronounce "Zwetschgenkuchen" properly, so I just call it "Pflaumenkuchen"

I have never heard that N pronounced.

"Zwetschgekuchen" I say because that`s what I`ve always heard.

 

On 10/31/2019, 4:26:58, Boggsdollocks said:

Even after all these years, I still take an extra second to figure out "neunundvierzig" is "forty-nine".

This.

Even after 20 years when I count stuff to myself I always count in English.

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8 hours ago, Boggsdollocks said:

ask for a "leberkäsesemmel" instead of a "fleischkäsebrötchen" at the Fleischerei (Metzgerei)

Isn`t there some sort of rule that only leberkäse from Bayern is allowed to be called leberkäse and all others must be fleischkäse ?

 

Round here people just ask for an LKW.

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it took me about three years before I could recite my phone number in German without reading it off the cheat sheet I kept in my bag for just such occasions.  Like, I could not remember my phone number and translate it at the same time.

 

funny how the brain farts on some key points :)

 

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I still can't usually tell the difference between 60 and 70, and all associated numbers. In the choir I have just joined I always try and sit next to the same lady, in fact she now defends an empty space next to her from all comers until I arrive because she knows that if I point randomly at a word she needs to say it loud enough so I can hear the pronunciation but quietly enough that the director/rest of the choir isn't disturbed and if he calls out bar numbers she points at the right one so that I can read it quickly.

 

It has been a steep learning curve. I have now given up on trying to fit the word jauchze into a millisecond with an octave leap. Jau-ze is enough - practically everyone else is a native German so I don't think I'll be missed!

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It's funny but I have problems saying my phone number in English when needed.

 

ETA - Not to sound like I speak German all the time. I rarely do. I've just been asked for my number so many times in doctor's offices, etc.

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I don't even try. I seek a household slave, or I have to write it down and read it out.

 

edit - realise that FF is saying she struggles to say it in English. Respect. 

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When I got a new phone number I did like I used to as a punishment in school--I wrote 50 times, and every morning as I'd start the day, I'd stop and recite it to myself to keep it fresh.

 

Ironically, like Fraufruit, I have trouble saying it in English when giving it to a business in America, and end up having to write it down and read it off.

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12 minutes ago, kiplette said:

I don't even try. I seek a household slave, or I have to write it down and read it out.

 

yeah that was my tack for ages, too.  I'd given up.  Then...one day...it just spilled out!

 

different but somehow still similar to my struggles with "Schwantalerhöhe", "Feuerzangenbowle" and even the dreaded "Eichhörnchen"  I LOVE saying those words now, but they used to fill me with terror.  Til suddenly, they didn't.

 

still have trouble with "Bienenstich".  apparently.  as the ladies at the bakery look like I just kicked a puppy when I say it :/

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I can recite my German mobile number in seconds but have to think about it when speaking in English. That´s because I was in Germany when mobiles started out.

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Even after all these years..including 25 in Germany, I will never be a native speaker, though I am fluent.

I remember once carrying out an experiment. My then German girlfriend going back over 20 years ago  was already in bed and close to sleeping and I asked her if I could ask her some things.

I chose difficult words from a dictionary and asked if der, die, das.

She got them all right.

Of course, they learn from day one the endings of words. But it is still soul-destroying for us mere mortals!

:)

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47 minutes ago, john g. said:

Of course, they learn from day one the endings of words.

 

We "learn" them the same way you "learned" English.

We simply grow up and "know" them, no effort expended ;)

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Yes, Panda, and the wonderfully amusing thing is when you have children interpreting for their parents! I remember selling ice cream in a park in Buenos Aires and the woman who bought an ice cream off me was actually English but was living there and her son was born there and was bilingual (sort of ).

The mother agreed to an experiment of sorts and the boy faithfully translated everything we said together in Spanish into English! He didn´t know how cute he was! What a straight face he kept! 

What was really funny: years later, I ended up back in London and started my studies at University College London..and who was one of my professors/tutors?

The mother in the park! Back in the UK!

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13 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

We "learn" them the same way you "learned" English.

 

 

Up here, they apparently 'learn' them in Klasse 2 or 3, I can't remember.

 

I did feel kind of irritated, because of course as you say they weren't really learning them as I had to. They basically knew. What they were doing was learning pegs of grammar concepts to hang their absorbed knowledge on.

 

As we would have in England as kids if it hadn't been considered pointless back then.

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Even after all these years: I still remember learning multiplying and dividing and adding at primary school. You learnt off by heart..drummed into you. Nowadays, I wonder how many shop assistants (but not only in those jobs ) can multiply, divide and add without technology!

 

Mind you, the previous generation from poorer backgrounds eg my mum´s..she didn´t do well at school or even last there long. But she was a wizz kid when it came to betting on the horses as an adult. She could tell you her winnings if she bet x amount on a  horse at odds of such and such..I wouldn´t have had a clue - and still don´t - as I have never been a betting man ( apart from betting against the odds on life in general ! )....

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37 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

 

We "learn" them the same way you "learned" English.

We simply grow up and "know" them, no effort expended ;)

I did it the other way, Panda! The day I was born, I spoke to my mother..my first word was " Steuern ". Not sure of my pronunciation, though...

Then I forgot to pay tax later!

:lol:

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Was she also a teacher of double postings, HEM?

:lol:

 

( Do the same, by the way!! )

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Even after all these years I remember when my 2nd grade teacher slapped me in my face because she had found a little straw basket we had to tinker in class as a mother´s day present on the street. She assumed I had thrown it away because I didn´t want to give it to my mom. She was right. But not because I thought my mom didn´t deserve it - as she thought - but because I thought it wasn´t good enough.

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38 minutes ago, john g. said:

Even after all these years: I still remember learning multiplying and dividing and adding at primary school. You learnt off by heart..drummed into you. Nowadays, I wonder how many shop assistants (but not only in those jobs ) can multiply, divide and add without technology!

 

Mind you, the previous generation from poorer backgrounds eg my mum´s..she didn´t do well at school or even last there long. But she was a wizz kid when it came to betting on the horses as an adult. She could tell you her winnings if she bet x amount on a  horse at odds of such and such..I wouldn´t have had a clue - and still don´t - as I have never been a betting man ( apart from betting against the odds on life in general ! )...

The lady in my local kiosk cracks me up. She just can't add up. I'll go in there with 3 empties and she needs a calculator and gives me back 24 cents. She then adds up 3 beers. 3 x 1.10 of course with her calculator. She needs it again when I give her anything but the correct change. Nuts!

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