Burial of deceased pet on own land and/or under own building itself

92 posts in this topic

Tupperware? Biscuit tin? Why not just a decomposable shoe box? Or is it really a cat? :ph34r:

Under the cellar, so ghoulish...

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13 hours ago, bramble said:

 

I agree. Besides I feel that burying (hiding) a pet's body under the cellar floor is disrespectful to the pet. 

Why is cremation not an option? Besides you can take the ashes in an urn back home, where burying it in the garden might be a possibility.

We don't feel that at all, quite the opposite. This way we know where she is. We do not like the idea of cremation in the slightest - personal feelings. We don't want ashes or an urn. 

10 hours ago, lisa13 said:

I fully agree but also think that burying them anywhere is not much better.  I could never bring myself to put any of my kitties in the ground.  Cold and wet and someday I may move and leave them behind...can't do it. But others don't see it this way.  Point being if they are ok with it, our feelings on the topic aren't really relevant.  

This exactly. We just wanted to know if problems could arise or we were going against any regulations. It seems to be alright.

9 hours ago, optimista said:

Tupperware? Biscuit tin? Why not just a decomposable shoe box? Or is it really a cat? :ph34r:

Under the cellar, so ghoulish...

Under the cellar means she will not be disturbed, dug up (at least not in our lifetime) or cause any problems with our garden being near to water etc. 

We consider a pet to be a member of the family and it not to be ghoulish. 

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59 minutes ago, lunaCH said:

We don't feel that at all, quite the opposite. This way we know where she is. We do not like the idea of cremation in the slightest - personal feelings. We don't want ashes or an urn. 

This exactly. We just wanted to know if problems could arise or we were going against any regulations. It seems to be alright.

Under the cellar means she will not be disturbed, dug up (at least not in our lifetime) or cause any problems with our garden being near to water etc. 

We consider a pet to be a member of the family and it not to be ghoulish. 

 

Thanks for clarifying. Although I'm not sure that a coffin lasting 500 years is permitted as the rules state that the animal should be wrapped in material that easily decomposes. Maybe you should inquire first, but it's up to you to decide how you interpret the regulations.

 

The link @someonesdaughter provided states:

 

Quote

Man muss auch darauf achten, dass man die Leiche des Tieres vor der Bestattung in Material wickelt, das leicht verrottet. Dafür eignen sich Wolldecken, Zeitungen oder Handtücher.

 

 

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45 minutes ago, bramble said:

Thanks for clarifying. Although I'm not sure that a coffin lasting 500 years is permitted as the rules state that the animal should be wrapped in material that easily decomposes.

 

Yes.  Things could get real messy if everyone buried their pets in coffins that last 500 years.

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24 minutes ago, snowingagain said:

 Things could get real messy if everyone buried their pets in coffins that last 500 years.

True, though that would depend on where they bury them. But in any case this isn't going to happen as many pets are cremated or disposed of via a vet, also most people who do bury them, do not bury them in coffins. This is an exceptional case for a vulnerable person.

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We put our beloved cat in a basket. It felt like a 'proper' casket to the kids, but the willow won't last very long in the earth. The pottering in the garden suggestion is good - it also gives you a lovely place to sit and remember the cat afterwards. Most cellars are not that nice.

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5 hours ago, bramble said:

 

Thanks for clarifying. Although I'm not sure that a coffin lasting 500 years is permitted as the rules state that the animal should be wrapped in material that easily decomposes. Maybe you should inquire first, but it's up to you to decide how you interpret the regulations.

The link @someonesdaughter provided states: 

Thank you. This is definitely something to bear in mind. Of course, with or without a coffin, there would always be a blanket of some kind so that the corpse was well wrapped, though I would not opt for something flimsy like newspapers, at least not for a cat.

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2 hours ago, kiplette said:

We put our beloved cat in a basket. It felt like a 'proper' casket to the kids, but the willow won't last very long in the earth. The pottering in the garden suggestion is good - it also gives you a lovely place to sit and remember the cat afterwards. Most cellars are not that nice.

 

Yes, I would be way happier returning the animal to the nature it came from, and was closer to than we people are.

 

When I go, I'll be cremated and scattered in the sea I love and have dived in so much.

 

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42 minutes ago, Metall said:

When I go, I'll be cremated and scattered in the sea I love and have dived in so much.

 

Not wishing to be too pedantic (and certainly off topic),

but that's not what the Germans allow...

 

Ones ashes may be put in a bio-degradable urn and this is lowered into the sea.

Flowers & petals may be thrown onto the sea surface.

 

Only very few people are allowed to touch the urn.

It will be sent directly from the chapel to the (duly licenced) funeral boat.


Been there; 

thoughtful memories every time we sail over his spot.

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4 hours ago, lunaCH said:

True, though that would depend on where they bury them. But in any case this isn't going to happen as many pets are cremated or disposed of via a vet, also most people who do bury them, do not bury them in coffins. This is an exceptional case for a vulnerable person.

Are you entombing the cat in concrete or what? What is this 500 year material?

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14 minutes ago, HH_Sailor said:

Only very few people are allowed to touch the urn.

It will be sent directly from the chapel to the (duly licenced) funeral boat.

 

There are of course perfectly legal ways of getting a human ash urn out of German hands and into those of family to perform said scattering. But that is not the topic of this thread.

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7 hours ago, lunaCH said:

We just wanted to know if problems could arise or we were going against any regulations. It seems to be alright.

 

 

If you think a coffin made from materials that should last 500 years is alright, you have not understood how things are done in Germany.

 

Look up the German word Ruhefrist.

 

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2 hours ago, Metall said:

Yes, I would be way happier returning the animal to the nature it came from, and was closer to than we people are.

 

Agreed, and I'm also certain the authorities would prefer dead animals to decompose as quickly as possible. This is probably why the regulations stipulate that the material they are buried in has to be decomposable so as not to stand in natures way. 

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

If you think a coffin made from materials that should last 500 years is alright, you have not understood how things are done

I'm not sure that the regulations go as far as specifying exactly what can or can't be interred under a cellar floor of an owned property and in what sort of container. Especially in view of the fact that the floor could be cemented over at some point.

42 minutes ago, bramble said:

Agreed, and I'm also certain the authorities would prefer dead animals to decompose as quickly as possible. This is probably why the regulations stipulate that the material they are buried in has to be decomposable so as not to stand in natures way. 

Sometimes personal feelings and needs in certain delicate situations have to come first. Sometimes the authorities and regulations can be just too much or too invasive. But since it could cause a problem, at least the option of the garden burial is discarded in this case.

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13 minutes ago, lunaCH said:

But since it could cause a problem, at least the option of the garden burial is discarded in this case.

 

Would you also discard burial in a Tierfriedhof (pet cemetary)? 

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OP- I am a tad concerned over your home/ neighbourly disputes/ heating installation plus the pet cemetery  debate. 

I would think the body of beloved kitty would degrade a lot faster in the garden than under concrete floor!  Wrapping said kitty in a favourite cloth, blanket sounds very suitable.

 

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I cannot really understand why anyone, however fragile,  would think letting their pet slowly disintegrate into a pile of wet  stinking rotten flesh in a plastic box under cement in  dark hole in a cellar is somehow preferable than a sunny spot somewhere where you can think about the happy days you had with them and letting the whole dust to dust, ashes to ashes, earth to earth process take place.

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3 hours ago, bramble said:

Would you also discard burial in a Tierfriedhof (pet cemetary)? 

In ordinary circumstances, definitely. Unfortunately the circumstances are exceptional and its not an option. It was looked at several times though.

1 hour ago, RedMidge said:

OP- I am a tad concerned over your home/ neighbourly disputes/ heating installation

As am I. Unfortunately these are situations we are having to face/deal with. We could not know that the situation with the neighbours would deteriorate despite all of our best efforts. 

1 hour ago, snowingagain said:

I cannot really understand why anyone, however fragile,  would think letting their pet slowly disintegrate into a pile of wet  stinking rotten flesh in a plastic box under cement in  dark hole in a cellar is somehow preferable than a sunny spot somewhere where you can think about the happy days you had with them and letting the whole dust to dust, ashes to ashes, earth to earth process take place.

I am sorry you feel that way and felt the need to post this very negative view which really does not help us. Clearly you do not understand these exceptional circumstances or just how fragile a person can be, nor have you ever suffered from or met anyone with severe and chronic depression and I sincerely hope you never do or never have to. Unfortunately this is the situation that is being faced. And as such I don't see it like you do at all and no matter how much I have thought about it, never have done. 

It is very easy to write the phrase 'no matter how fragile', when you do not have detailed background information. Here it is meaningless.

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Have you considered deep freezing your pet until a better end resting place can be made possible?

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1 minute ago, Kommentarlos said:

Have you considered deep freezing your pet until a better end resting place can be made possible?

Yes actually, but after some consideration we were against it, I know that this solution is used in some circumstances and in very hot climates. However as a better end resting place may not appear for some time, it would also mean running a freezer constantly and just for this purpose - one would have to consider power cuts, although few and far between, but also the freezer itself breaking down.

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