Burial of deceased pet on own land and/or under own building itself

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Hello. 

I wonder if anyone would be able to direct us on this delicate subject. Would there be any restriction on burying a deceased pet on one's own land at all and/or under a cellar floor, so within the foundations of our house? The pet would be in a sealed coffin. Unfortunately due to difficult and unusual circumstances we have no other option available. 

The plan in the future would be to redo the cellar floor (I assume cement), as currently the floor is stones/grit with bricks on top. The room in question is not heated and the coffin would be more than 40 centimetres from the surface. 

Should we simply keep quiet about it? 

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hm.

 

My cat met his demise at the emergency vet, and the vet asked me, "do you want to take him with you?" which struck me as a strange question. 

 

"why?" 

"so you can bury him in your garden?" 

"is that allowed?" 

"NO!  absolutely not!  <then looking at the ceiling, floor, anywhere but at me> but you...could.  So do you want to take him?"

 

and I think that sums it up pretty well.  No, you are not allowed to, but you could.

 

why don't you just have your pet cremated?  It's not very expensive and if the place that handled my kitty represents the norm, you can even attend the cremation which can serve as a solid "goodbye" ritual of sorts.  

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Thank you. This is more or less what I thought. If we keep quiet and the burial is under the property and one day it will even be cemented over, then no one but us would ever know and it really is not going to be an issue.  

 

Garden would have been an option, but then neighbours may see and report it. I believe also it has to be much deeper by law and also there may be a restriction if in proximity to a river. I just wanted to know how strict it is or if it is even enforced/enforceable. Due to these complications the garden option is not viable.

 

Cremation or burial elsewhere is simply not an option owing to the fragility of the owner.

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1 hour ago, lunaCH said:

 

I wonder if anyone would be able to direct us on this delicate subject. Would there be any restriction on burying a deceased pet on one's own land at all

 

If the property is located in a water protection area or nature reserve, this is forbidden - otherwise not. https://anwaltauskunft.de/magazin/leben/ehe-familie/tiere-bestatten-was-muss-man-beachten

 

Quote

 

and/or under a cellar floor, so within the foundations of our house?

 

Do you own a house? In your two other threads you write about a flat. Common property is of course taboo for your unusual project. 

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Yes, the property is close to a river. But as mentioned, the garden option has been discarded. We don't know if it a water protection area. The next town is up to a point, but we are unsure about our land.

 

Yes we own the property, I spoke of a house as it is a house divided into two flats. We own the lower flat which covers nearly all of the ground floor of the building, including a private cellar (neighbours have no access and door to it is within our flat) under which burial is possible owing to the type of floor.

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After I had to have my cat put down my vet asked me if I have a garden. I said yes. Then you bury him in your garden he said. It's the best. We all come from the earth.

 

I did bury him in the garden. When i sell that house the new owners will have a shock if they start digging around.

 

In Canada I buried two cats in the garden. I never even considered it might not be allowed.

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1 hour ago, LeonG said:

In Canada I buried two cats in the garden. I never even considered it might not be allowed.

 

If there are rules about this in Canada, I doubt anyone knows!

 

IME, our vet always presumed the remains would be taken for backyard burials. Otherwise they'll cremate for anyone who doesn't have a backyard. My parents' backyard has 5 cat skeletons eternally sleeping under one back corner.

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It's good to know that they decompose quickly and won't scare a new owner digging in the yard.

 

I haven't wrapped my cats in anything when I've buried them. I curl them up like they're sleeping and toss in a dandelion or two.

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@lunaCH: I would start a little planting project, put in some fall flowers like asters, maybe a shrub or two, scatter around some tulip bulbs for next spring, putter around on the property...

... and in the course of your gardening project, quietly bury your pet (maybe at night) under said tulips.

That's what I would do. Also a very pretty memory.

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To add to the gardening project - I would bury your pet without a casket etc., or at least keep it simple.Think about wrapping your pet in its favorite towel or something similar to comfort the owner.

LeonG's description is very apt, right down to the dandelions.

*ahem* *thinking of own pet*

 

And yes, from my own experience I know small animals decompose quite quickly, within weeks in fact. I would not worry about a future owner.

 

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My parent's garden is a pet cemetery. Dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, birds, mice, fish, pigeons (flew into window and died), moles (met dog and didn't survive). All were buried. The dogs about 4-5 ft deep wrapped in blankets.

 

I would not use a coffin as that would greatly hinder the decomposing. I would also not bury an animal in the cellar. If anyone digs up the coffin in the future, that would be very creepy. Also, it eventually decays and it is only 40 cm underground, you might have a problem with the floor.

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Mr Metall buried his dog under a large stone in his parents' garden back in the day...

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I agree with the other recent posts...not sure if you've mentioned somewhere the size of your deceased pet though I would most certainly avoid burying in your cellar. We have 2 cats buried in our garden and in each case, the vets advised a minimum of 50 cm depth enclosed in a cardboard box and any other decomposable blanket/towel etc.  My mother was also recently advised to add a wire mesh on top of the box of her deceased dog to help prevent digging up by other wild animals.   Sure you can manage to do this discreetly. 

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The garden is not an option because of the river nearby and lack of clarity on the rules for water protection etc. Also there are foxes in the area as rubbish gets ripped open I've been told. 

A coffin made from the material we are using would not decay for more than 500 years so we won't have an issue with the cellar floor as decomposition would take place inside the coffin which remains rigid. 

The only possibility of it being dug up is if the floor (which we may cement over in any case) was broken and dug up by a future owner - I think this is quite unlikely. 

If in the distant future and not in our lifetimes the house was demolished, I guess the box would be found, - but it would be clear what it is. 

The animal is a cat and is a small to medium one (4 kg). 

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30 minutes ago, lunaCH said:

A coffin made from the material we are using would not decay for more than 500 years

 

 

30 minutes ago, lunaCH said:

If in the distant future and not in our lifetimes the house was demolished, I guess the box would be found, - but it would be clear what it is.

 

Sure, once they actually got around to opening it. The only problem is that the first assumption when the authorities find such a coffin probably won't be a pet, but rather human body parts and that would set off an investigation.

 

I'm not so sure that the coffin is such a good idea.

 

 

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Thank you. i must say I had not thought of that possibility, however whoever found it would see from the outside what it is through it being clearly marked. Nonetheless we will bear it in mind.

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22 minutes ago, engelchen said:

Sure, once they actually got around to opening it. The only problem is that the first assumption when the authorities find such a coffin probably won't be a pet, but rather human body parts and that would set off an investigation.

 

I'm not so sure that the coffin is such a good idea.

 

I agree. Besides I feel that burying (hiding) a pet's body under the cellar floor is disrespectful to the pet. 

 

23 hours ago, lunaCH said:

Cremation or burial elsewhere is simply not an option owing to the fragility of the owner.

 

Why is cremation not an option? Aren't you the owner? Besides you can take the ashes in an urn back home, where burying it in the garden might be a possibility. This is what I will do when my dog dies, as not cremated he is too large for my plant boxes. 

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With a 4 kg cat,  you won't create any problems contaminating the river.  A bunny dying in its burrow would be similar.  

I think the problems with water contamination are more of an issue when you bury a 60 kg mastiff or Great Dane... 

And what engelchen said...

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3 hours ago, bramble said:

I feel that burying (hiding) a pet's body under the cellar floor is disrespectful to the pet. 

 

I fully agree but also think that burying them anywhere is not much better.  I could never bring myself to put any of my kitties in the ground.  Cold and wet and someday I may move and leave them behind...can't do it.

 

But others don't see it this way.  Point being if they are ok with it, our feelings on the topic aren't really relevant.  

 

 

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