What has disappointed you lately?

24 posts in this topic

So, the other day, an Athenian who has a house in our village, and a posh car, stopped my Nicole in the street and said: " oh, one of my cats is not well. Can you help ?"

So, Nicole checks out the cat, who is clearly really in a bad shape, and says: " take him to a vet."

So the Athenian says: " I´m going back to Athens on Monday..can you help? " ie he didn´t give a shit.

Nicole says she will take the cat to the vet and we did so yesterday. The cat had internal injuries, probably hit by a car  a week ago or so and was dying.so we had to ask the vet to put her to sleep. We took photos. 30 euros at the vet.

So we see the Athenian and Nicole speaks to him. " She had to be put to sleep."

Athenian: " ok."

 

NO remorse from him that the cat had been injured probably a week or so ago and NO questions re costs. EG: how much is the petrol (40 kilometres there and back ) and costs at the vet. Nothing.

It is the typical local syndrome .." you are a foreigner..sort it out. "

 

That´s the way it is here...but disappointing and did we expect anything else? No, not really.

 

What has disappointed you lately? But..massively?

 

 

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I was hoping nobody would notice that, French! :lol:

 

I missed the final couple of hours and got home ( I had left the radio on!) and heard someone say " so we will now talk to the winníng Australian captain "..or something horrible!! :ph34r:

 

I knew...then..

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It's interesting. I haven't been to Greece yet. But this mindest was a story line in Durrells in Corfu.  It's quite a different cultural perspective than some of us are used to.

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Poor cat. How strange that they should expect you to take care of their cat. Is it because they think foreigners are automatically wealthier than them or is it some kind of "foreigner tax"? Do they reciprocate in any way themselves, e.g. by being more hospitable or generous with their time than Brits/other western Europeans?

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13 minutes ago, Lorelei said:

Poor cat. How strange that they should expect you to take care of their cat. Is it because they think foreigners are automatically wealthier than them or is it some kind of "foreigner tax"? Do they reciprocate in any way themselves, e.g. by being more hospitable or generous with their time than Brits/other western Europeans?

 

Johng is obviously the  man to go to with distressed animals in his village.!  Great work John, rewarding  with the animals, but humans  let you down every time.

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Well. I started reading more on this subject and there’s quite a lot out there about Greeks poisoning animals and treating them cruelly.  As a result others are starting organizations to try and curb these behaviors.  Seems to be a very complicated cultural issue.

 

i regularly visit Yerevan, Armenia, another place with many, many street dogs.  But the Armenians are all friendly to the street dogs.  They even stop the car when a dog is crossing the street.  

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There is a wonderful Greek animal rescuer who lives with over 300 dogs not far from us.

Just google Takis animal rescue Crete and you will see what he does/ has to put up with!

He used to be a businessman and gave his career/ money making up for animals.

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1 hour ago, Lorelei said:

Poor cat. How strange that they should expect you to take care of their cat. Is it because they think foreigners are automatically wealthier than them or is it some kind of "foreigner tax"? Do they reciprocate in any way themselves, e.g. by being more hospitable or generous with their time than Brits/other western Europeans?

Ah, Lorelei! Dogs are not regarded as pets by the majority of Greeks. There are exceptions, particularly among younger people.

You wouldn’t believe what we have seen here over the years.

Other foreigners have even told of how they’d found a dog thrown over their fence, for example. ie “ rich foreigners/ you do it.”

 

One of our Greek neighbours offered to drive a puppy we’d found in distress “ to the beach.” Translation? To drown it or chuck off the cliff. He even told us : “ we Greeks think you foreigners are stupid looking after animals.”

We once visited a Greek man and sat in his garden whilst his dog was chained up, hardly able to move in the garden on a short lease on a hot summer day and restless. “ That dog is crazy, “ he told us whilst enjoying his beer.

Friends have had their dogs poisoned. We have had some of our cats poisoned.

 

Currently, on the way from our village to the nearest town, there are four young dogs in the bushes at different places which we feed and water every day. All abandoned.

 

Some foreign campers left in fury when they challenged a taverna owner who had thrown a cat into the sea in the winter at our local beach. They will never come back.

 

We see all kinds of stuff which is illegal but the authorities do not have the resources to deal with it. 

 

Hanging dogs from trees is no longer legal/ how about that!

 

It may change in time but it will take a mixture of punitive sanctions, an improvement in education and a much less attitude of “ they’re only dogs.”

My partner Nicole witnessed a little boy crying in town a few months ago and asked him what was wrong. He pointed to a bleeding dog on the road. The boy’s mother turned up and told her son to stop crying. Her words: “ it’s only a dog,”

 

Nicole really ripped that woman’s ears off!👍🏼 She gave her a right scolding with the appropriate swear words in Greek!!

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That's awful. I had no idea Greece was like that. Thanks for the comprehensive reply, John.

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The Maltese islands are pretty much the same.
 

Nothing changed until Malta joined the EU and harsh laws were enacted *and* enforced.

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33 minutes ago, Metall said:

The Maltese islands are pretty much the same.
 

Nothing changed until Malta joined the EU and harsh laws were enacted *and* enforced.

To break a lance for Malta, things are changing, slowly, very slowly but they are changing. The "hunters" for instance are harrased in increasing numbers. Stray cats and dogs are cared for in little "villages," they are fed and watered and neutered by NGO´s and volunteers. 

It´s not there yet but it´s moving in the right direction.

At the moment it is a thing of inertia by the older traditionalists and will die out in a generation or two.

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2 hours ago, Lorelei said:

That's awful. I had no idea Greece was like that. Thanks for the comprehensive reply, John.

Unfortunately, its even worse than in my summary, Lorelei. My rants will continue!

:angry::D

 

Since our big dog died the other week ( put to sleep...it was tough ), I no longer have to go down a particular public road and get stared at, sworn at etc by three particular local individuals for having the affront to walk Snoopy down there with  his cancer., 

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Hello what dissapoints me is that  people dont care about other people .And that i did not find my dear friend Melanie.

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9 minutes ago, Magmax said:

And that i did not find my dear friend Melanie.

 

Did you check under the sofa?

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2 hours ago, john g. said:

Unfortunately, its even worse than in my summary, Lorelei. My rants will continue!

:angry::D

 

Since our big dog died the other week ( put to sleep...it was tough ), I no longer have to go down a particular public road and get stared at, sworn at etc by three particular local individuals for having the affront to walk Snoopy down there with  his cancer., 

Oh John - This must be difficult for you and Nicole as you are both such animal lovers.  Having just moved to Konstanz 3 months ago from the US I am so thankful that I brought my dog here with me.  (I fretted over whether or not it might work out, but it has.)

 

I absolutely LOVE the way that dogs are integrated into the culture here.  And, as a bonus, it's been very helpful for connecting to people.  Every morning I meet an 85 year old woman in our neighborhood (she has a chihuahua) and we walk our dogs along the Rhein for their morning duties. She enjoys the company, talks my ear off, and has exponentially improved my comprehension of German (and dialekt!).  It's been win-win.

 

I have a Pom Mix, which is to say a "Zwerg Spitz Mischung."  It took me about 3 days of practice with my German husband before I could fluently belt that out!  

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slammer wrote: "To break a lance for Malta".  I can't remember hearing that phrase before - a serious gap in my knowledge! 

 

My next English class will be even more fun than usual.

 

Thank you slammer.

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3 hours ago, starkebogen said:

slammer wrote: "To break a lance for Malta". [..]

My next English class will be even more fun than usual.

Just don't break a butterfly on the wheel in your English class, as your German students will immediately understand the phrase "to break a lance", as it is the English equivalent to the German eine Lanze brechen.

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