Leaving the country - what will I miss/not miss?

130 posts in this topic

Fish and chip shops were closed on a Monday as well - couldn't get fresh fish after Sunday I suppose. Pubs opened from around 11.30 till 2:00 at lunch time and at 7 'till 11 during the week and 'till 10:30 on a Sunday. We have all this deregulation and are people really happier? It's just ever decreasing circles.

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I remember being really embarrassed when my then Brazilian brother-in-law visited us in London ( that WORLD city..) in the early 80s and the pub closed in the afternoon and I couldn‘t suggest another one to go to to have a further drink in🙁

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27 minutes ago, john g. said:

What I also remember: I asked the newsagent, Alan, one day what was in the brown paper bag I spotted and he showed me: a Danish porn mag!!!! I admit, that was probably my first " hard on  " and I was about 12 or so!!:D

Or, as they say in Bristol: "Yurrr, I reckon 'e's one o' they preverts."

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Something I don`t think you will miss is the German sense of humour....

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1 hour ago, HEM said:

For Lake District:

I took the family up the easy Wainwrights when we were last there and she loved it - Catbells and the lighter treks. Stayed near Cockermouth (fnar!). of course one dare not mention Withnail and I which was made there...

 

1 hour ago, HEM said:

For Peak District:

The Crich Tramway Museum! I was raised on a diet of "Places of interest" as a kid and that was one of them. Made famous recently in that movie about the symbiotic relationship between caravanning and serial killing, Sightseers:

 

 

 

39 minutes ago, john g. said:

I don´t know how old you are, French, but I remember being a paper boy in the early 60s in England 

 

Did it have a basket on the front John? By 'eck!

 

 

Couldn't resist that. Who was the snob who called out "Dvorak" when it came on and who else said "it's the bloody Hovis music!"

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10 hours ago, rodisi said:

I lived in Greece for a total of eight years.  What I don't miss is the chaos and what I do miss is the chaos. A country with which I have a love/hate relashionship.

 

 

Something like this occurs to me a lot. I really do appreciate that things are (mostly) so well-organised here, that people actually do what they say they're going to do etc, but on the other hand, I sometimes/often yearn for some unpredictictability, some looseness in terms of arrangements and plans, some spontaneity, a little bit of the Australian "She'll be right." attitude (even when there's no good reason to actually believe that they will!) etc.  

 

My theory is that this longing for something other than the reassuring predictable monotony of many people's lives here explains why so many Germans enjoy going to Italy on holiday! On holiday only of course -  a brief but exhilharating taste of chaos, la dolce vita, unreliability, passionate irrationality...and then schnell back home again...until next time.

 

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Aussiedog said:

My theory is that this longing for something other than the reassuring predictable monotony of many people's lives here explains why so many Germans enjoy going to Italy on holiday! On holiday only of course -  a brief but exhilharating taste of chaos, la dolce vita, unreliability, passionate irrationality...and then schnell back home again...until next time.

 

Someone called Germany a Swedish Open Prison when I first came here in 2001. I also like the Ordnung but yearn for some decent chaos! Yup that's what you get in France and Italy and I always find Germans way nicer and more calm down there!

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11 hours ago, robinson100 said:

Something I don`t think you will miss is the German sense of humour...

 

Because that's such an easy target? (insert rim-shot here)

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9 hours ago, Aussiedog said:

a little bit of the Australian "She'll be right." attitude (even when there's no good reason to actually believe that they will!) etc. 

 

Sort of "Wir schaffen das"

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9 hours ago, Aussiedog said:

Something like this occurs to me a lot. I really do appreciate that things are (mostly) so well-organised here, that people actually do what they say they're going to do etc, but on the other hand, I sometimes/often yearn for some unpredictictability, some looseness in terms of arrangements and plans, some spontaneity, a little bit of the Australian "She'll be right." attitude (even when there's no good reason to actually believe that they will!) etc.  

 

We have the same thing in Iceland.  This "everything will work out" attitude, even when it doesn't look like it.  It might have something to do with extreme nature / weather and history of farming.  If you get depressed about it and stop trying, you've just made sure that it isn't going to work out so what you need to do is continue your work and hope for the best.  Then if it doesn't work out, tough luck.

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27 minutes ago, LeonG said:

We have the same thing in Iceland.  This "everything will work out" attitude, even when it doesn't look like it.  It might have something to do with extreme nature / weather and history of farming.  If you get depressed about it and stop trying, you've just made sure that it isn't going to work out so what you need to do is continue your work and hope for the best.  Then if it doesn't work out, tough luck.

Gene Krantz, Flight director at NASA's doomed apollo 13 mission, who managed to eventually bring back the three astronauts, called his biography "Failure is not an option". This kind of thinking obvioulsy isn't limited to some countries...

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Miss: German bread, some beers, restaurants where the food is actually edible, physical infrastructure

Don't miss: social incompetence, robots, poker face, gratuitous aggression when you are receiving "service", passive aggression, lack of cooperation, lack of anyone being responsible unless they officially are, lack of imagination, lack of empathy, prevarication, tax forms, the German language, the neighbours in Bogenhausen. :lol:

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50 minutes ago, franklan said:

Gene Krantz, Flight director at NASA's doomed apollo 13 mission, who managed to eventually bring back the three astronauts, called his biography "Failure is not an option". This kind of thinking obvioulsy isn't limited to some countries...

 

Kranz's grandfather was a German immigrant though ;-)

 

Seriously, Kranz is an inspiration. His response to the Apollo 1 tragedy is required reading.

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1 hour ago, LeonG said:

 

We have the same thing in Iceland.  This "everything will work out" attitude, even when it doesn't look like it.  It might have something to do with extreme nature / weather and history of farming.  If you get depressed about it and stop trying, you've just made sure that it isn't going to work out so what you need to do is continue your work and hope for the best.  Then if it doesn't work out, tough luck.

 

There's a bit of grim fatalism/there's no alternative but to keep going in the Australian version too. I too think that it has something to with the extremely harsh conditions that the early settlers (convicts) faced there.

 

Maybe we have to move to Iceland! My German wife had a cycling holiday there long before she met me, and till this day raves about the place whenever she gets the chance!

 

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5 hours ago, franklan said:

Gene Krantz, Flight director at NASA's doomed apollo 13 mission, who managed to eventually bring back the three astronauts, called his biography "Failure is not an option". This kind of thinking obvioulsy isn't limited to some countries...

 

Around 15 years ago whilst I was working for Sun Microsystems I attended a number of what was called "STS" (Services Technical Symposium) in the USA where a large portion of the entire services folks within the company came together for networking, talks by senior management & break-out sessions (I lectured at a number of them).  Usually there was a guest speaker of some description (the first one I attended in Denver in 2001 had Douglas Adams - a few weeks before he died).

 

Anyhow one year (I think it was held in San Francisco) the guest speaker was Gene Kranz.  I think we only knew a very short time in advance that he would be speaking.  OK - he gives his speech professionally but he had the entire audience (4000+ from around the world) rivited.  That was an experience of a lifetime.

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1 hour ago, Metall said:

Is there by any chance a recording of that talk?

Not that I know of...

 

However if you go to Youtube & search for "Gene Kranz failure" ye shall find...

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10 hours ago, LeonG said:

 

We have the same thing in Iceland.  This "everything will work out" attitude, even when it doesn't look like it.  It might have something to do with extreme nature / weather and history of farming.  If you get depressed about it and stop trying, you've just made sure that it isn't going to work out so what you need to do is continue your work and hope for the best.  Then if it doesn't work out, tough luck.

 

Similar mentality in Wales from the extreme weather, rain makes everyone laid back.

9 hours ago, optimista said:

Miss: German bread, some beers, restaurants where the food is actually edible, physical infrastructure

Don't miss: social incompetence, robots, poker face, gratuitous aggression when you are receiving "service", passive aggression, lack of cooperation, lack of anyone being responsible unless they officially are, lack of imagination, lack of empathy, prevarication, tax forms, the German language, the neighbours in Bogenhausen. :lol:

I hereby accuse you of plagiarising what I was about to put! Social incompetence - yep that's a catch all.

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22 hours ago, robinson100 said:

Something I don`t think you will miss is the German sense of humour...

The longer I live here, the more I appreciate that there actually IS a German sense of humour...there were the endless jokes about life in the DDR and after...what's the difference between Sozialismus and Orgasmus...under socialism, you moan for a lot longer...what's the difference between a Trabant and a Jehovah's Witness...you can shut the door on a Jehovah's Witness, and then there was an advert a while back on Berlin buses for a Chinese airline with a picture of the Great Wall and the logo: "Hey, Berliners, wanna see another Wall?" Then the regional jokes...what do you call a Prussian who HASN'T got piles...a pure and simple arsehole/asshole, so on and so forth.

 

I remember also a comedy show with a standup comedian of Turkish origin, and he was imagining the next generation of satnavs...you don't just have a voice, but a hologram...like Darth Vader...."You are taking the left-hand path, young Skywalker...

 

Couldn't live here if there was no sense of fun and mischief.

 

 

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