Insurance for unemployed mother with newborn

4 posts in this topic

We have been living with my wife for 3 years in Germany. Three months ago our child was born. Now, my wife and my daughter are insured as dependent members with public insurance (my wife was not working before having a child). 

 

Given a good job opportunity, I will leave the country to go somewhere else to work, but we decided for my wife to stay with the kid in Germany, with relatives, for a few months (so that I can find a house and settle, before they join me). 

 

I am wondering what happens with insurance for the kid and my wife. We received a letter a couple of weeks ago mentioning that the kid will be insured, but I am not sure what happens with my wife. Does anyone have any clue?

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15 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

 

 

PandaMunich, thank you for pointing me to the right direction. The post is very informative. To summarise (and please correct me if I am wrong): if my wife stays in Germany, they will consider half my income as her income and then I would have to pay contributions (Is it 15.5% + 2.05% or so, as I am paying now to TK?). E.g. if my income is 50000E, then I would have to pay 

50000/2/12*(0.155+0.0205) =~ 365E per month. 

Just to add another thought: my wife currently receives elterngeld (the minimum as a housewife), does this change anything?

Also, would it be cheaper and possible to have my wife and kid privately insured (if we notify TK on time)?

 

And a final one: I will not be living in Germany and I will not be commuting to Germany. Would we have to pay taxes in Germany?

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3 hours ago, chanioman said:

To summarise (and please correct me if I am wrong): if my wife stays in Germany, they will consider half my income as her income and then I would have to pay contributions (Is it 15.5% + 2.05% or so, as I am paying now to TK?). E.g. if my income is 50000E, then I would have to pay 

50000/2/12*(0.155+0.0205) =~ 365E per month. 

Just to add another thought: my wife currently receives elterngeld (the minimum as a housewife), does this change anything?

 

It's (source):

  • 14.6% KV + 0.7% Zusatzbeitrag * 3.05% PV = 18.35% 

and it's based on:

  • half your gross (= before income tax and social security deductions) monthly salary 

So if your gross monthly salary is 2,083.33€, then she would have to pay under the Hausfrauentarif:

  • 18.35% * 2,083.33€ = 382.29€ per month

for her public health&nursing insurance at TK. 

 

3 hours ago, chanioman said:

Just to add another thought: my wife currently receives elterngeld (the minimum as a housewife), does this change anything?

 

No, since Elterngeld does not count as income for public health insurance (source):

 

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3 hours ago, chanioman said:

Also, would it be cheaper and possible to have my wife and kid privately insured (if we notify TK on time)?

 

No idea, but the question is whether a private insurance would take her just for a few months.

They are very picky.

 

3 hours ago, chanioman said:

I will not be living in Germany and I will not be commuting to Germany. Would we have to pay taxes in Germany?

 

That depends on the residency clause of the double taxation agreement (DTA) between Germany and the country that you will be moving to, you can look up all DTAs here:  https://www.bundesfinanzministerium.de/Web/DE/Themen/Steuern/Internationales_Steuerrecht/Staatenbezogene_Informationen/staatenbezogene_info.html

 

Keeping your family in Germany, it can be argued that the centre of your life (= Mittelpunkt der Lebensinteressen) is still here, which would also make you taxable here.

So if you intend to work in Greece, that DTA has such a "Mittelpunkt der Lebensinteressen" clause in article II, Nr. 4 b.) aa.), so the Finanzamt could make a very good case for you having to pay your income tax to Germany, yes.

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