New words or sayings

114 posts in this topic

7 hours ago, fraufruit said:

I'm with lisa13, "Let's try to meet up for coffee." = Ain't happenin'.

I noticed that in when I was in a four-bed ward for a month after giving birth to Fuenfling.  The nurses would ask the newly arrived women, 'Are you going to nurse?'  Whenever the reply was, 'I'll try,' the babies went home on bottles.

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On 8.8.2019, 10:12:56, alderhill said:

Best not to tell him English was already a total bastardization of earlier English, itself the original bastard rapebaby of Anglo-Saxon and French, the Celtic stratum all but scrubbed out, then peppered with hoity-toity Latin and Greek. Then later further enriched by the spoils of colonialism, and now, netspeak. 

 

I mean, I get it, there are definitely neologisms or even turns in grammar that annoy the hell out of me. But it seems pointless to fuss about this too much since language is never static always dynamic. All of our great-grandparents (assuming English speakers) would probably decry how we talk.

 

 

Yes, fair enough, I see your point etc.

 

However, as an old fogey/stick in the mud, I find the turning of nouns into verbs to be particularly annoying.

When I hear something like, " We actioned that last week.", I feel all queasy.

 

Here's a very interesting article on the subject. The author sees it your way basically.

https://www.1843magazine.com/content/ideas/anthony-gardner/youve-been-verbed

 

And don't get me started on the expression 'moving forward'! I know it's used all the time but I can't stand it, sorry!

 

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On 8/12/2019, 8:10:27, clickety6 said:

...She tried to pick the pen up... and she succeeded. She might have failed to pick it up. But until she's tried to pick it up, we don't know what the outcome will be. Until she's tried she can't do...

Oh man, thank goodness I wasn't stoned when I read this..

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7 hours ago, Techsmex said:

Oh man, thank goodness I wasn't stoned when I read this..

 

Reading it back again now, it looks like I could have been when I wrote it!

 

 

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19 hours ago, Aussiedog said:

However, as an old fogey/stick in the mud, I find the turning of nouns into verbs to be particularly annoying.

When I hear something like, " We actioned that last week.", I feel all queasy.

 

This comic is from the mid-80s if I'm not mistaken:

5d53f6e5907f6_calvin-and-hobbes1.jpg.582

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On 8/13/2019, 6:52:01, Aussiedog said:

However, as an old fogey/stick in the mud, I find the turning of nouns into verbs to be particularly annoying.

When I hear something like, " We actioned that last week.", I feel all queasy.

 

Here's a very interesting article on the subject. The author sees it your way basically.

https://www.1843magazine.com/content/ideas/anthony-gardner/youve-been-verbed

I hear ya, it annoys me too, especially when its marketing buzz or managerbabble and other stupid hoodwinking types of jargon. A polished turd is still a turd. Although 'verbing' is nearly as old as English itself, and it's just kind of how language works (as the article mentions). 

 

On 8/13/2019, 6:52:01, Aussiedog said:

And don't get me started on the expression 'moving forward'! I know it's used all the time but I can't stand it, sorry!

More boilerplate acid on the ears.

 

9 hours ago, El Jeffo said:

This comic is from the mid-80s if I'm not mistaken:

5d53f6e5907f6_calvin-and-hobbes1.jpg.582

I have this pinned to my wall at work. 

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On 8/13/2019, 6:52:01, Aussiedog said:

 

 

 I find the turning of nouns into verbs to be particularly annoying.

 

Impact

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To "pimp" something, i.e. to customize something.     Strange to hear it in a professional setting.  

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5 hours ago, balticus said:

To "pimp" something, i.e. to customize something.     Strange to hear it in a professional setting.  

 

Maybe a different origin?

The French word pimper means to dress something up grandly which fits better to the usage like "pimp my ride". 

Did this usage originate in Quebec or Louisiana? :)

 

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Here's an article from the year 2000 saying that "pimp" had started to be used to mean "cool" and could be traced back to hip-hop. Apparently someone from the OED doesn't think it comes from "pimper".

 

Quote

 

The Pimp Phenomenon

 

...white middle-class college students, secretaries, outdoor-sports companies, chat-room denizens, T-shirt makers, all kinds of people who have never had a thing to do with the sex trade and never would, have co-opted the word “pimp,” making it a synonym for “cool.” Birthday presents are pimp, and clothes are pimp. Bikes are pimp, and cars are pimp.

 

Cultural observers say the phenomenon can be traced to hip-hop and music videos.

...

Sheidlower, who documents American English for the OED, authored the comprehensive book “The F Word,” and has given years of study to the word “mack,” a synonym for “pimp.”

 

The origin of the word “pimp” is unknown, said Sheidlower, who disagrees with Webster’s etymology that attributes it to the French pimper, meaning to allure or to dress smartly. ...

 

 

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MTV coined it with "pimp my ride". It's fairly crude street slang, because pimps have always been notorious for having flashy cars.

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I followed the Ashes today ( England v Australia cricket ) and an Australian commentator said: „ my first initial reaction was..“, referring to an on-field incident!

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