New words or sayings

114 posts in this topic

If it is unclear if the basis is informal, i.e. Sie/du and thus Herr Gunn instead of John, i use "Hi", "Hello", "Guten Morgen", etc with no name. 

 

If we are on a formal basis, but the name is one i don't know and the recipient has no clear photo on Xing, LinkedIn or other professional networks, I prefer not to guess if the person identifies as male or female and whether "Frau Gunn" or "Herr Gunn" is appropriate.    

 

One of the funniest E-mails i received (from an American) simply stated "Standard Greetings Apply".     Begin/End is another good one.  

 

I am a big fan of using "Best" as a closer.   It is short, to the point, polite but not sentimental.    

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On 8/2/2019, 11:12:31, French bean said:

He just hated bastardisation of the English language. He spoke better English than you found on the BBC then, not like now when half the buggers can't even spell. He would have had a field day with JRM as well.

Best not to tell him English was already a total bastardization of earlier English, itself the original bastard rapebaby of Anglo-Saxon and French, the Celtic stratum all but scrubbed out, then peppered with hoity-toity Latin and Greek. Then later further enriched by the spoils of colonialism, and now, netspeak. 

 

I mean, I get it, there are definitely neologisms or even turns in grammar that annoy the hell out of me. But it seems pointless to fuss about this too much since language is never static always dynamic. All of our great-grandparents (assuming English speakers) would probably decry how we talk.

 

My bugbears are pretty much all marketing/advertising buzz and jargon. I have several friends in the advertising industry back home, which is difficult because they are friends but I absolutely loathe their line of work.

 

On 8/2/2019, 1:18:52, BobbyDigital said:

I low-key loathe the use of "low-key."

I also noticed someone recently use "high-key," but it was in German, so I assumed just like how they've done Old-Timer/Young-Timer, they (those who bastardize English words and put them in the German language) assumed "high-key" must also be a thing.

Although it's not a fixed phrase, and as such might lead to confusion, you have to admit it shows some creativity or application of a certain kind of logic. God knows how much I butcher German with my literal calques and so on.

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1 hour ago, Feierabend said:

Instrumental pieces of music are not "songs."

Please.


What about birds'? :)

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2 hours ago, alderhill said:

Best not to tell him English was already a total bastardization of earlier English, itself the original bastard rapebaby of Anglo-Saxon and French, the Celtic stratum all but scrubbed out, then peppered with hoity-toity Latin and Greek. Then later further enriched by the spoils of colonialism, and now, netspeak. 

 

I mean, I get it, there are definitely neologisms or even turns in grammar that annoy the hell out of me. But it seems pointless to fuss about this too much since language is never static always dynamic. All of our great-grandparents (assuming English speakers) would probably decry how we talk.

 

My bugbears are pretty much all marketing/advertising buzz and jargon. I have several friends in the advertising industry back home, which is difficult because they are friends but I absolutely loathe their line of work.

 

Although it's not a fixed phrase, and as such might lead to confusion, you have to admit it shows some creativity or application of a certain kind of logic. God knows how much I butcher German with my literal calques and so on.

You forgot the Dutch influence. I think in the 18th century or maybe earlier when there was a shortage of printers and setters in England. The Dutch came over and altered the spelling on so many words. I think any word that has 'ough' in it is an example - trough, through, cough etc.

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6 hours ago, alderhill said:

literal calques

 

It's getting harder and harder to get literal calques on vinyl so I'd play 'em as loud as you want. YOLO

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On 8/7/2019, 4:49:08, anne k said:

The "of" just appeared in the UK in the last few years so I assume it's been around longer in the US.

 

Spoken English in general seems to be a huge trash fire these days. Any UK podcast I listen to, especially mainstream news, parliament etc. is just a torrent of scrappy, unconnected partial sentences. As for the conceptual content, well...

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The use of "attractiveness" in business-speak really gets on my nerves, e.g.

 

"Recent lay-offs have increased the attractiveness of the company in the eyes of private equity firms."

 

I think the word "appeal" is much more elegant but all of my clients seem to be unaware of its existence and I have to constantly cringe and battle the urge to edit their copy because they write "attractiveness" all the time.

 

"Recent lay-offs have increased the appeal of the company in the eyes of private equity firms."

 

Maybe it's just me, but I think the second sentence sounds much nicer.

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22 minutes ago, Keleth said:

could of instead of could have.

 

And ratcheting up, 'could of went'.

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On 9 August 2019 07:06:20, Keleth said:

could of instead of could have.

 

Oh, absolutely! I wonder if that's an error that's spread by people seeing it on social media, as "loose" instead of "lose" seems to be.

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On trips back I notice people using terms differently, or new stuff cropping up.

 

When people snuffed it, croaked, shuffled off this mortal coil, we used to say oh, he passed away.  Now, he's passed.  Passed what?

 

Can't stand it when people want to say something is really good, they'll say it's the shit.  Man, it's the shit!

 

And what is it with issues?  Oh, that one, he's got issues.  No, they're problems. At least they used to be. 

 

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"could of" somehow reminds me of "try and"

 

in the US at least, even in print media, it's widely accepted to use "try and" perform some action, eg "I will try and pay my bills on time", and it's like fingernails on a blackboard to me.

 

I think it bugs me primarily as it completely changes the meaning of the statement but in the guise of saying something else.  So one will "try" in a general sense and "pay my bills on time" is sort of a separate thing - it's very wishy washy.  Whereas saying "I will try TO pay my bills on time" is a much stronger and more specific statement.

 

I think "try and" is a psychological cop out.  Regardless, it drives me nuts.

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Evening, Tor! What´s that? Great, brilliant etc? Sort of erleuchtert?:lol::lol:

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22 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

"could of" somehow reminds me of "try and"

 

in the US at least, even in print media, it's widely accepted to use "try and" perform some action, eg "I will try and pay my bills on time", and it's like fingernails on a blackboard to me.

 

I think it bugs me primarily as it completely changes the meaning of the statement but in the guise of saying something else.  So one will "try" in a general sense and "pay my bills on time" is sort of a separate thing - it's very wishy washy.  Whereas saying "I will try TO pay my bills on time" is a much stronger and more specific statement.

 

I think "try and" is a psychological cop out.  Regardless, it drives me nuts.

Going back to my first time in the US, lisa, back in 1973. I first heard the term " can I get a coffee? ". I took an instant dislike to that and still hate it!

By the way, I actually once had a glare from a very close American friend when I asked him: " can you fetch me a beer? " when I saw him on the way to the bar. " That´s only for dogs, John. "

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19 minutes ago, john g. said:

" can I get a coffee? "

 

was that in California per chance?  In NY where I grew up, you ordered a coffee by just by telling them how you wanted it.  Walk up to the counter "light with two sugars" or "light" or "black"...and nothing more, MAYBE throw in a "please" at the end if you were in uncharted waters :)   Of course if you were a regular you didn't have to say, just a "hey, how ya doin'" and they'd get the job done.

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Hmm, when I ordered a tea for breakfast at Denny's, the waitress brought me a cold ice tea? If you want an "European" tea, you have to say:"a hot tea." Silly me.

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