New words or sayings

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I hate it when people say abbreviations out loud from the internet. Like for example LOL, instead of saying "that's funny" actually saying "LOL"

 

 

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People who instead of saying "Hang on a minute" saying "Bear with ... ... "  I could shoot them in the face.

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42 minutes ago, hooperski said:

People who instead of saying "Hang on a minute" saying "Bear with ... ... "  I could shoot them in the face.

 

I can’t bear it.  Imagine being held at gunpoint (bear with me) by some bi 'polar' Englishman that wants to shoot you in the face!

and the only hope of rescue is (BEAR WITH ME) disarming him with my bare hands.  Unbearable. But hold on a minute, just wait, hang on. Bare with me. just hold tight, OK?  Now then, see?   Listen up.  if you can bear with me for the next few minutes, I want to thank you for bearing with me all these years on TT.  

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"It's not that big of a deal", mainly as I can't bring myself to say it and will eventually have people correcting me when I say something is "not that big a deal".

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12 minutes ago, anne k said:

"It's not that big of a deal", mainly as I can't bring myself to say it and will eventually have people correcting me when I say something is "not that big a deal".

How is your version correct?

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Not new, but these two examples seem to be in widespread use.   Not a fan of either. 

 

1.  The use of the word "like" as a connector.      The train was like 20 minutes late and when it got there we were like totally irritated.   

 

2.  The optics on this are ... - meaning this is going to create a ...  impression.   

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Biggest problem is when people (my daughter) use American English instead of British English. She learns phrases at school.

 

A former twat of a manager use to talk about going on Vacation. It's not Vacation it's Holiday.

God damn? Just damn is good enough.

It's not a Subway it's an underpass.

 

That reminds me, people forget the rule concerning the use of AN before a vowel. 'H' is not a vowel, it is a consonant so why do people say 'a Hotel' and then 'an 'otel'

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It's not "God damn" (amusing capitalization choice). In AmE  it's goddamn or, if you've got a little south in your mouth, it's goTdam (amusing capitalization for emphasis).

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5 minutes ago, AlexTr said:

It's not "God damn" (amusing capitalization choice). In AmE  it's goddamn or, if you've got a little south in your mouth, it's goTdam (amusing capitalization for emphasis).

my error, I always capitalise God - even though I'm agnostic.

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4 hours ago, BobbyDigital said:

How is your version correct?

Oh no, it's happening already :o

 

Thats just how everyone used to say it, before people started saying "not that big of a deal".

 

It's a big deal. / Its a big cat.

How big a deal is it? / How big a cat is it?

It's that big a deal! /It's that big a cat!

It isn't that big a deal./It isn't that big a cat.

 

The "of" just appeared in the UK in the last few years so I assume it's been around longer in the US.

 

Here's a blog article on the topic.

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Same here, lisa! I also hate getting emails with just " Hi " as a salutation. If you seek me out for something, give me a name! But it´s a sign of the times..whoever writes like that is writing to 20 others at the same time.

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10 hours ago, john g. said:

Same here, lisa! I also hate getting emails with just " Hi " as a salutation. If you seek me out for something, give me a name! But it´s a sign of the times..whoever writes like that is writing to 20 others at the same time.

 

I don't agree, certainly if someone was specifically emailing you then I believe Dear John would be appropriate but for example if I mail an information request to someone where the name is not known then I believe Hi is in order. The alternative, Dear Sir or Madam is way to formal.

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16 minutes ago, keith2011 said:

 

I don't agree, certainly if someone was specifically emailing you then I believe Dear John would be appropriate but for example if I mail an information request to someone where the name is not known then I believe Hi is in order. The alternative, Dear Sir or Madam is way to formal.

I teach in a number of organisations in and around Frankfurt and I can see a trend building where no salutations are used, especially in emails from the States. Many emails go straight into the topic without a Hi or a Dear. Unfortunately, it's the way it is today, formality is disappearing. 

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50 minutes ago, Tap said:

I teach in a number of organisations in and around Frankfurt and I can see a trend building where no salutations are used, especially in emails from the States. Many emails go straight into the topic without a Hi or a Dear. Unfortunately, it's the way it is today, formality is disappearing. 

I have had dealings and email contacts with the USA over many years and I don't think that is new. The education system over there is not great on literacy and things like letter writing. Nothing to do with intelligence I have met some of the brightest people in the USA  who struggle to put a few words together in an email.

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