New words or sayings

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Language is always evolving and each year there are additions.

Are there any words or sayings that get on your nerves?

Totes, Chillax and Bantz do it for me.

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Ha! Kid#1 came back from Oxford with a penchant for greeting Dad jokes with , 'Oh, the Archbishop of Banterbury strikes again...'

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I literally cringe when people over/misuse "literally"

 

common sense life-living tips are now "hacks"

 

there is also this absolutely obnoxious trend in the US of referring to  many things as "something goals".  examples would be "a cup of hot tea on the sofa is relaxation goals" or "traveling the world is vacation goals" gah!  it just makes NO SENSE grammatically nor otherwise.  like fingernails on a blackboard every time I read or hear that

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The spoken abbreviation of words that are used in full sentences.. 

 

recommend... rec

different...diff

episode.. ep

 

 etc. 

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on an opposite note, I want to see a revival of: "full of piss and vinegar", "(aww) shucks" and "word" (= genau)

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"goals":

Americans feel they have to be purposeful (rather than aimless). One manifestation of this phenomenon is having aims/goals.

Probably a downstream effect of the Protestant work ethic.

My $NZ0.02.

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16 hours ago, hooperski said:

Are there any words or sayings that get on your nerves?

 

'Malarkey',  a word I heard from presidential candidate Joe Biden the other night during the democratic debates..  for some reason it seemed meaningless talk & nonsense

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Malarkey should be added to the vocabulary, considering how much of it is currently being spewed by politicians, conspiracy theorists, and ignorant pundits.  Here is a Walt Kelly panel from Pogo, dating from 1955.  Simple J. Malarkey represented Senator Joseph McCarthy (Republican senator, Wisconsin), who claimed Communists were rampant in the US State Department, though the number of names on McCarthy's infamous lists was constantly changing up and down.  Ol' Porkypine and Pogo, on the left, are taken aback by Molester P. Mole's introduction of Simple J.; Deacon Mushrat is on the right.

 

Image result for simple j malarkey images

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Kathleilz  Everything I know of politics was learned whilst reading Pogo on the floor before the fireplace.  Kelly was a genius.  He's worth a read today.  pretty cutting edge 49 to early 50;s,  dead on for the politics of today.   If they will even print him.  The animals in the okifenochii swamp In Florida is a microcosim of the real world.  He gives no one a break. (especially Politicians)  when I was 10 I built a swamp boat (scow) just like his to philosophize and  fish off.  Still have it, still works a treat and I'm 74

Dave the Barbarian

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One thing that used to really piss off my dad (an English teacher) was the use of the word 'situation'

 

We have a war situation

there is a public nuisance situation

we will have a political collapse situation.

 

You either have something or you don't. Situation is the position of something in relation to its surroundings.

 

My biggest gripe is bullshit by thick people in business management trying to sound clever. Blue Sky Thinking, out of the Box, Concentric etc.

 

What's wrong with original ideas, Lateral thinking or core processes, systems or procedures?

 

WTF is Ideate? (Yes I know what it is but a totally pointless word)

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1 hour ago, LukeSkywalker said:

Your dad must have really disliked the Situation Room in the White House then :).

He just hated bastardisation of the English language. He spoke better English than you found on the BBC then, not like now when half the buggers can't even spell. He would have had a field day with JRM as well.

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Speaking of goalz - revenge body goals.

 

This is what women now do when their husband/partner do them wrong and they break up - the woman works on a revenge body instead of just getting over him. Not only that, she tells everyone that is what her goal is - revenge body. Meanwhile, the man is already off with someone else and has totally forgotten about her.

 

 

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I low-key loathe the use of "low-key."

I also noticed someone recently use "high-key," but it was in German, so I assumed just like how they've done Old-Timer/Young-Timer, they (those who bastardize English words and put them in the German language) assumed "high-key" must also be a thing.

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7 hours ago, fraufruit said:

Speaking of goalz - revenge body goals.

 

This is what women now do when their husband/partner do them wrong and they break up - the woman works on a revenge body instead of just getting over him. Not only that, she tells everyone that is what her goal is - revenge body. Meanwhile, the man is already off with someone else and has totally forgotten about her.

:D

Reminds me of the exchange:
How do you get rid of 170 pounds of ugly fat?
Divorce him.

But seriously, 'revenge body' could be replaced with 'reward body.'

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"Speaking to" something, as in "I can't speak to that", meaning "I can't comment on that", or "global warming speaks to human activity", meaning "global warming reflects human activity" (I think I've got the first one right, not too sure about the second). I've noticed "speaking to" being used on CNN International, so suspect it's an Americanism

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The words aren't new but saying 'you know' as a filler when talking - I first noticed it with Tony Blair and then ever second person on the BBC seemed to follow suit. Really annoying.

 

A phrase that is new and is both ridiculous and annoying is Gwyneth Paltrow's 'conscious uncoupling'.

 

 

 

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I also hate how everything is called "a mood" these days.

 

"Amal Clooney wears such and such a dress and it is such a mood."

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Pestrentner is a word I can get onboard with.

 

Who can not say that they have nit been borthered by a pensioner with too much free time on their hands.

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