Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Few German Mothers Go Back To Work Full Time.

12 posts in this topic

I think the article misses the main reason many women don't return to work: the lack of available childcare places and the very short school hours. For a family in Germany there is basically no way to have both parents work full time with school age children unless they get help from family to cover all the times formal care isn't available.

6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Auswanderer said:

I think the article misses the main reason many women don't return to work: the lack of available childcare places and the very short school hours. For a family in Germany there is basically no way to have both parents work full time with school age children unless they get help from family to cover all the times formal care isn't available.

Of course it is possible. For 4 years, my wife worked 8.5h per day, 5 days a week. You just need to de-sync the schedules. She arrives at work at 7am, I take my son to kita/krippe/school at 8am, she picks him up later in the afternoon.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went back to work full time when my youngest child started school. (I worked part time when they were in kindergarten.)

 

There was an after school club which provided a warm lunch and helped them with their homework. I had to pay extra for the after school club though. It was open until 17.00 so I had to start work really early, luckily I had a good employer who allowed me to work flexible working hours.

 

There were a few women (West Germans) who had a problem with me because of it, the east German women seemed to accept it more as did the other expats.

 

Me and my husband did the same as MikeMelga did above. It worked out fine.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the point is finding said after school program can be hard. Both my husband work full time and have never gotten a place in after school care that goes until 17:00. We would be SOL without extended family nearby to pickup the slack. 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of my friends went back to work with reduced hours because they preferred time with their children to time in the office.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, norcal_sf said:

I think the point is finding said after school program can be hard. Both my husband work full time and have never gotten a place in after school care that goes until 17:00. We would be SOL without extended family nearby to pickup the slack. 

 

Friends of mine have the same experience. Getting a full day space at Kita can be hard and finding an all day school too. I'm hearing from ppl that kids are starting school on some days as late as 9 and on some days are done at 11 so that would make a full time job impossible and even a part time job you'd need a boss willing to be extremely flexible. 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Anna66 said:

luckily I had a good employer who allowed me to work flexible working hours

 

of course this is more likely to work when one (or ideally both) parents have flexible work schedules.  many people do not have that luxury :/

 

I have friends who recently received what pretty much amounts to a letter of condolence from the city as they have not been able to secure a kindergarten slot for their son now that he has outgrown his kita - forget long day or after school care, he's not going to be in kindergarten at all.  The letter basically said "someone is going to stay home to care for him, right?"  

 

right.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Auswanderer said:

I think the article misses the main reason many women don't return to work: the lack of available childcare places and the very short school hours. For a family in Germany there is basically no way to have both parents work full time with school age children unless they get help from family to cover all the times formal care isn't available.

 

 

9 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

of course this is more likely to work when one (or ideally both) parents have flexible work schedules.  many people do not have that luxury :/

 

 

We had to put our children on the after school club waiting list when they started kindergarten and every six months we had to provide an "Arbeitbescheinigung" from both parents stating they work full time (for the after school club when they were there). The lady there told me that there are actually stay at home parents who try to put their kids in the after school club as they need a "break" so that they had to make sure that the places were allocated to people who really needed the place.

 

It was not easy to come by, and it is so true indeed that school hours are haywire here in Germany. Sometimes the kids start at 7.45, other days as late as 9.45. Sometimes they finish at 11.20, sometimes 13.30... It is pure chaos. Not easy at all. We were very lucky indeed having such a good employer and to get an after school place for our children.

 

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting to hear how you cope, but have you been called a  Rabenmütter ?  Does the term "rabenvater" even exist?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if you are lucky and can arrange full working hours coverage you still are expected to supervise homework and ensure that your kid gets enough tutoring at home to get at least reasonable report cards. 

And yes there is even Rabeneltern. But then you know ravens are actually very caring parents.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, catjones said:

It's interesting to hear how you cope, but have you been called a  Rabenmütter ?  Does the term "rabenvater" even exist?

Of course not, only applicable in bavaria to women, who until 1972 had to have written permission from their husbands to get a job.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0