Looking for case handler / adjudicator role, hoping to escape Brexit

81 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, engelchen said:

From his earlier posts, I got the impression that he was looking for a professional job in the 50k+ / year range.

Wouldn´t that mean being part of the working poor in Switzerland?

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8 hours ago, engelchen said:

If the types of jobs for which you are looking don't actually exist (or barely exist), networking won't help much. More importantly, how long can you afford to live abroad without a job? Do you really want to move abroad to join the working poor?

For a few months i could afford it and I would hope to not be poor for too long!

 

8 hours ago, engelchen said:

Although you seem to have much better social skills than the other poster (I suspect social skills/attitude play a role in the reason the other poster cannot find a better position), it is a good example of what happens to foreigners who move to Germany unprepared.

Thanks!

 

8 hours ago, engelchen said:

What will happen to those jobs then? Since you are targeting jobs where the ability to write proper English is important, these jobs cannot easily be outsourced to Eastern Europe. Will employers be forced to hire more employees directly?

 

Why are you assuming that your job prospects will be better in a foreign country where you don't speak and write the local language at a level to compete with the locals for skilled jobs in non-technical fields?

It seems that those jobs will turn into permanent roles (directly employed), earning less.

I take your point that my job prospects would not be enhanced by moving abroad.. it's also about the adventure of living somewhere different.

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8 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

Applying for a junior position from the uk right before brexit, and not speaking german?

 

Honestly this isnt even a disadvantage its a complete dealbreaker, they stand no realistic chance. 

 

Even assuming the jobs exist and can be got from overseas, what are the odds of having it all wrapped up in time to get here and be "safe" as it were as an employee before brexit and work permits and whatever?

 

Hand on heart, I just dont think this idea is going anywhere, Aidan needs a better plan.

Thanks for posting, I can see that my plan does need some work.

However I guess there are some positions where the language is not an issue, and they don't need to know that I'm applying from abroad..

Germany has said that even in the event of a disorderly Brexit, there would be 3 months before anything changes, so there may well be time. 

 

8 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

I could be wrong, but isnt Aidan normally a guys name?

Yes I'm not going to get any advantage from fluttering my eyelashes!

 

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I was speaking to someone from near Karlsruhe who said that unemployment in Baden-Wuerttemberg is only at 2% (and that consists mainly of people with work-related injuries or mental health issues) and so they welcome immigrants keen to work.

 

I would like to think that I would be able to find something there even not if immediately well-paid. I mean the odds seem a lot better than Berlin which many people seem to start off in.

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Berlin is definitely one of the worst places for a new immigrant to start. Not as bad as other parts of eastern Germany, but much more disappointing (the illusion of startups and various exploitation of foreigners schemes).

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Quote

I could be wrong, but isnt Aidan normally a guys name?

 

That is what I was thinking, but didn't think I should assume. :)

 

6 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

However I guess there are some positions where the language is not an issue

 

Of course, however, I thought we were talking about professional jobs. You only need basic language skills (B1/B2) for to be a cleaner or for many positions in the hospitality industry. If you have the right license, you could also become a bus or truck driver.

 

6 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

, and they don't need to know that I'm applying from abroad..

 

How do you think you can hide this? Do you have an address you could use in Germany? 

 

6 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

I was speaking to someone from near Karlsruhe who said that unemployment in Baden-Wuerttemberg is only at 2% (and that consists mainly of people with work-related injuries or mental health issues) and so they welcome immigrants keen to work.

 

There are many employers who are desperately looking for workers in Baden Württemberg  and Bayern, however, unless you can find cheap housing, you'll be joining the working poor. The locals who have affordable housing often don't realise how much rents have risen until they try to move. A single newcomer often needs to look for shared accommodation. 

 

6 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

I would like to think that I would be able to find something there even not if immediately well-paid. 

 

What well-paid jobs could you do? 

 

6 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

I mean the odds seem a lot better than Berlin which many people seem to start off in.

 

It all depends on what you want from life (and a bit on how old you are). If you just want an adventure and don't mind flipping burgers and living in a flat share with a low probability of finding a professional job, you could try to move ASAP to Baden-Württemberg or Bavaria. If you have sufficient funds to throw at the problem (short-term accommodation is expensive), you could theoretically have everything sorted before Brexit. However, this is a somewhat risky and potentially expensive option.

 

I think you need to first decide what you want to do with your life.

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8 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

Yes I'm not going to get any advantage from fluttering my eyelashes!

 

Never lose hope! I think you are right to target South Germany, if only for the weather. Personally I find the Baden-Württemberger a much more civilised breed than the average gruff Bavarian. Freiburg would be where I'd look. Have you considered chauffeur/valet/gardner/personal assistant to some rich old bloke just to get you out of the UK?

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On 11/2/2019, 8:14:21, engelchen said:

There are many employers who are desperately looking for workers in Baden Württemberg  and Bayern, however, unless you can find cheap housing, you'll be joining the working poor. The locals who have affordable housing often don't realise how much rents have risen until they try to move. A single newcomer often needs to look for shared accommodation. 

 

Quote

 

What she says is absolutely true.  In Konstanz, where we moved this past year,  there are loads of announcements for low skilled jobs.  Every other bakery and department store here is advertising a mini job.  Go to H&M and you will see the gig economy in force, different workers each day of the week.  I have been offered a mini job at a school helping immigrant kids with homework, but I am a retired expat who will do it for integration purposes rather than to make ends meet.

 

Housing here is very difficult to find, and it has become extremely expensive.  For example, newly made friends moved to our neighborhood from Frankfurt this year.  They purchased their condo 10 years ago and rented it out until moving here.  During that period it has DOUBLED in value!  We were extremely lucky to find a good rental.  Turnover is low because it's hard to find something else suitable.  The locals can't believe it.

 

Having a plan and local connections, if possible, would be advisable.  Or maybe you can accept that it just may be a short term adventure.  That being said, if you can swing it, living on the Bodensee is lovely.  Good luck to you.

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On 02/11/2019, 09:00:45, optimista said:

Have you considered chauffeur/valet/gardner/personal assistant to some rich old bloke just to get you out of the UK?

Interesting suggestions, I hadn't considered these!

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On 02/11/2019, 07:14:21, engelchen said:

How do you think you can hide this? Do you have an address you could use in Germany?

I don't have an address at all on my CV but I could put a hotel address down if it's needed, or airbnb address.

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On 11/2/2019, 9:14:21, engelchen said:

There are many employers who are desperately looking for workers in Baden Württemberg  and Bayern, however, unless you can find cheap housing, you'll be joining the working poor.

Not necessarily. Where I used to live (near Würzburg, Bavaria) unemployment is very low but you can still get affordable housing if you´re prepared to commute 20 km or so. My son is renting a 20 year old 54 sqm flat with decent standards for € 390 warm -including electricity - in a town 21 km from the city and within the public transport coverage area.

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Hi Aidan, have you thought about teaching English? Pay starts at 15 Euros for 45 mins, and you will have to be prepared for it being on a freelance basis, which means that it's like a zero hours contract. Being a native English speaker is qualification enough.

If you can't get enough hours teaching, you can have a minijob on the side, earning 450 Euros a month. Unskilled minijobs are easy to some by. The minimum wage is 8,50 Euros an hour, make sure your employer respects this.

Also, I don't think JSA is means-tested for the first six months or year, if you were working before claiming it. You can claim it for 3 months while living in another EU country and looking for jobs. As long as Brexit hasn't happened yet, this is true. So you should hurry up.

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19 hours ago, optimista said:

@ Jeba. How??

What do you mean? € 6 -6.5 per sqm is the going rate in rural areas 20 km North of Würzburg according to his landlord. So he pays € 320 cold rent plus € 70 for heating , electricity, etc.

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21 hours ago, JamStar said:

Hi Aidan, have you thought about teaching English? Pay starts at 15 Euros for 45 mins

To whom?! German adults seem to have had that sorted at school.

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21 hours ago, JamStar said:

If you can't get enough hours teaching, you can have a minijob on the side, earning 450 Euros a month. Unskilled minijobs are easy to some by. The minimum wage is 8,50 Euros an hour, make sure your employer respects this.

Thanks for this suggestion - I always wondered how a minijob could pay so little but if it's restricted to 53 hours a month that makes more sense.

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On 6.11.2019, 02:02:00, JamStar said:

The minimum wage is 8,50 Euros an hour,

 

Since January 1, 2019, the minimum wage has been 9.19€/hour.

 

13 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

To whom?! German adults seem to have had that sorted at school.

 

Not all Germans speak English well.

 

13 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

I always wondered how a minijob could pay so little but if it's restricted to 53 hours a month that makes more sense.

 

Only since the minimum wage was introduced. Before the introduction of the minimum wage there were many people working full-time for 400€/month and then receiving topup welfare benefits.

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On 11/2/2019, 1:16:00, CuriousAidan said:

However I guess there are some positions where the language is not an issue, and they don't need to know that I'm applying from abroad..

 

A proper German application will plainly state that you are applying from abroad (your address, nationality, etc. regardless of your work/education details), and if you somehow try to obscure this, your application will go in the reject pile.

 

On 9/5/2019, 6:02:03, engelchen said:

I'm the wrong person to ask about Switzerland. I hated living there.

 

Out of curiosity, why? I've visited a dozen times, and apart from not being able to afford anything, always thought it was nice enough. I have no desire to move there, just interested in hearing some insider critique. My wife (from BaWü) has a few family that have moved/married into Switzerland over the past few decades, and I've heard a few grumbles.

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On 11/6/2019, 11:36:50, CuriousAidan said:

To whom?! German adults seem to have had that sorted at school.

Oh, you sweet innocent lamb, how little you know!

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By way of an update, I am grateful for all the comments here of which I took careful note, and didn't make the move to Germany. I was looking at Luxembourg as well and tried some networking there over the winter but didn't secure a job before COVID-19 stopped everything.

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