Looking for case handler / adjudicator role, hoping to escape Brexit

55 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, CuriousAidan said:

Yes but I don't actually have a job.. From a quick check online, VHS in Frankfurt seems about half the price of Goethe in London.

 

Yes, the VHS is not expensive. 

 

Goethe Institut in Germany is more expensive than abroad though as only the overseas schools are subsidized.

 

Keep in mind, that it can be hard to get onto the VHS courses with the most popular teachers. 

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Well, at the moment, you can just come over, rent a holiday flat, Airbnb, and be a tourist for 3 months in Frankfurt. Covered by your EHIC , check out life, jobs, and see how you feel about life here.

A short flight over, and you still have till Brexit to decide! You say finances are good, so  why not ?

 

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7 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

From a quick check online, VHS in Frankfurt seems about half the price of Goethe in London.

Are you advanced enough to learn German in German? VHS can be OK but really Goethe is the best start you can have from the UK. Do yourself a favour and get some preparation in. Also a good way to meet a lot of very solid people. 

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1 hour ago, black1 said:

Are you advanced enough to learn German in German? VHS can be OK but really Goethe is the best start you can have from the UK. Do yourself a favour and get some preparation in. Also a good way to meet a lot of very solid people. 

 

I am not really advanced but I recognise that it's OK not to not understand every word in a class.

 

I have done some evening courses in London (not at Goethe) and was frustrated that so much English was spoken. In one course, some older classmates enjoyed improving the teacher's level of English by correcting her on some very minor points of English, including wasting time on debating these points. 

 

In another course with younger people, I was the only native English speaker and when a classmate didn't understand something in German, the teacher would explain in English, but the classmate didn't understand that either - debate would ensue about how exactly to express something in English.  

 

Solid people yes, and very sweet as well; I didn't feel able to grumble in either case.

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You could check out Deutsche Welle Online free course/conversation.  Nice to get your head and tongue around some basic phrases!

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the others have commented already in detail about the issues of moving here in general, the additional health insurance costs you'd need to factor in etc. That is just for "normal" moving of residence.

In order to be working in a similar capacity as you indicated in your initial opening of this thread, you would have to become a "Versicherungsberater". Which requires a special license in Germany...and there are only around 300 licensed Versicherungsberater in all of Germany, which may give you an idea about the complexity and requirements to become such a consultant in the first place. What you are planning on giving borders between financial advice and legal advice... and if you are not properly licensed, chances are very high that a disgruntled lawyer/solicitor specialized on fleezing naive and unprepared victims will send you a cease&desist order in short period of time which will costs you a few thousand EUR easily in legal fees. 

Besides: you would only be able to support clients who have an issue with bad advice given in English and with perhaps offshore investment and pension plans etc where you could communicate with the advisors and pension/investment companies in Englisch. Anyone who has an issue with a Germany based pension insurance or investment product would not really do well in asking you to help as all communication would be expected in German, and not just colloquial German but business German with a profound knowledge of insurance and legal lingo, too.

So, while I am sure that there is some demand for an English native speaker to act as a Versicherungsberater in Germany, the necessary qualifications to begin with, the licensing process (including rather expensive indemnity insurance), the lack of language skills etc does not seem to make your idea plausible in any way or form. 

 

Of course you could join some of the pyramid structure sales organisation from international financial advisor companies and sell you sole to them and the devil in order take away some fellow Expat's money - but I have the feeling you are too good a person to do that :-) (others still do and I always wonder how they can sleep or look into the mirror) 

 

Cheerio

 

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I have a sneaky feeling employers are not going to be keen to take on new recruits from the UK while Brexit is looming close. The Germans don't like uncertainty. Be aware that some expats are even having trouble getting a doctor's appointment. Shouldn't be this way in theory, but in practice... I am willing to bet the same will apply to getting a flat while Brexit remains unresolved.

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On 24/07/2019, 15:24:48, CuriousAidan said:

I was just thinking that there would be some fully English-speaking workplaces where poor German would not restrict me to a low pay job.

 

Yesterday I was talking to a friend of mine who is originally from Wales, but grew up here (her German is much better than her English) and is married to a German. She is getting tired of living in Berlin and thinking about other areas where they could live. Both of them work in IT related fields.

 

When I said I wasn't sure if I'd want to stay in Germany forever, she asked me where I would go. I told her I have no idea because I don't where I could get a skilled position. At first she had trouble understanding what I meant until I pointed out that I had no interest moving somewhere for an unskilled position and I don't have any transferable skills that don't require the local language and I'm limited to English or German office environments.

 

Quote

 

This is about what I could earn at McDonalds here.

 

Do you think it is better to work at McDs in Germany than McDs there?

 

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My qualifications are

- an arts degree

- Chartered Insurance Institute courses in financial planning / advice especially pensions, life assurance and tax (https://www.cii.co.uk/learning/qualifications/diploma-in-financial-planning-qualification/)

 

Since you have a diploma in financial planning, do you think it makes financial sense to move to Germany to work for minimum wage? From what you've posted so far, it seems to be lots of expenses and risks for little rewards.

 

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I can see that the above may not fit too closely into the German jobs market, however if there were some American companies which require people to review files of some nature, I might be able to use the experience I have?!

 

There is one law firm in Munich that frequently advertises for assistants who need to write excellent English and where no German is required. Apart from them, I really can't think of any jobs that meet your description.

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19 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

In another course with younger people, I was the only native English speaker and when a classmate didn't understand something in German, the teacher would explain in English, but the classmate didn't understand that either - debate would ensue about how exactly to express something in English.  

Then I recommend a course for some weeks at a really good school and enjoy a short time here. Goethe intensive in Berlin for example.

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6 hours ago, engelchen said:

Do you think it is better to work at McDs in Germany than McDs there?

Overall I guess in Germany that such a worker would have a better quality of life, especially in relation to cost and quality of housing, long-term tenancy agreements, public transport and state help for raising a family. But it's not my intention to work at McDs.

 

7 hours ago, engelchen said:

Since you have a diploma in financial planning, do you think it makes financial sense to move to Germany to work for minimum wage? From what you've posted so far, it seems to be lots of expenses and risks for little rewards.

Agreed, it only makes financial sense if I can find a job which pays well.

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7 hours ago, engelchen said:

There is one law firm in Munich that frequently advertises for assistants who need to write excellent English and where no German is required. Apart from them, I really can't think of any jobs that meet your description.

Thanks, I will see if I can find that law firm's adverts.

 

I have looked at some ECB adverts, they seem not to require any ability in German, just English and around B1 level of any other European language (I am probably at that level in French, or at least used to be).

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13 hours ago, Starshollow said:

So, while I am sure that there is some demand for an English native speaker to act as a Versicherungsberater in Germany, the necessary qualifications to begin with, the licensing process (including rather expensive indemnity insurance), the lack of language skills etc does not seem to make your idea plausible in any way or form. 

Thanks for taking the time to explain this. I take your point, although I think my background and salary expectations may be rather more humble than those of a Versicherungsberater.

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13 hours ago, Starshollow said:

Of course you could join some of the pyramid structure sales organisation from international financial advisor companies and sell you sole to them and the devil in order take away some fellow Expat's money - but I have the feeling you are too good a person to do that :-) (others still do and I always wonder how they can sleep or look into the mirror) 

I try to be a good person but in any case I am not a good salesperson!

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1 hour ago, CuriousAidan said:

Thanks for taking the time to explain this. I take your point, although I think my background and salary expectations may be rather more humble than those of a Versicherungsberater.

Starshollow is a long time TT poster who knows all about qualifications needed!

His point is- to give any sort of advice, as you describe, you need to have those certified qualifications.  

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10 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

Agreed, it only makes financial sense if I can find a job which pays well.

 

How would you define that?

 

10 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

Thanks, I will see if I can find that law firm's adverts.

 

This is the job that they keep advertising here.

 

https://grunecker.de/karriere/stellenangebot/english-team-assistant-mfd/

 

I have no idea how much they pay. If you want to apply there, include a timeframe when you would be in Munich and available for an interview (if they don't have to pay your travel costs, you are more likely to receive an interview).

 

10 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

I have looked at some ECB adverts, they seem not to require any ability in German, just English and around B1 level of any other European language (I am probably at that level in French, or at least used to be).

 

In order to work directly with the ECB you need an EU citizenship. I can't see them even considering your application until Brexit is off the table.

 

 

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OP, maybe a long shot but if your name is Aidan, do you have Irish parents / grandparents? Would you be eligible to apply for Irish citizenship? 

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20 hours ago, pmd said:

OP, maybe a long shot but if your name is Aidan, do you have Irish parents / grandparents? Would you be eligible to apply for Irish citizenship? 

 

That's actually a very good point. I second doing some family research aka genealogy.

 

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On 26/07/2019, 10:21:08, engelchen said:

This is the job that they keep advertising here.


https://grunecker.de/karriere/stellenangebot/english-team-assistant-mfd/

Thank you, I really never expected to get specific job suggestions on here and it seems like a job I could do.

 

Annoyingly they ask the applicant to give salary expectations.

One description of the job they give is Admin Assistant. A search on Glassdoor Germany shows that the average salary for Admin Assistant is 48k. Given that Munich has a higher than average cost of living, would it be reasonable to suggest 55k in an application to them?

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Oh yes, patent attorneys. Not just Grünecker. Been there, done that (albeit not with this particular firm), cannot recommend it. I certainly would not move countries for the pleasure. If they advertise often this is a result of high staff turn-over. People tend not to stay long...

 

The label Team Assistant is another word for typist, which rates lower than a secretary - also in terms of pay. "Nice working environment". Hmm. My own experience involved working in a tiny grey dusty office with seriously substandard office equipment and constantly under pressure. Colleagues were uncooperative (every man for himself, ladies - some of whom were sleeping with the boss, which adversely impacted office politics if you were not) and I did not appreciate the attitude of the partners towards their underlings. They treated you as such. Really unpleasant. If you are capable they will use you as a translator and paralegal assistant with specialist knowledge. This happened to me. My salary increases were risible and not commensurate with the job I was actually doing - and not atypical in the field. I felt exploited and eventually suffered burn-out. Once you are in this field, it is extremely difficult to move into another area, the job market in Germany being very inflexible.

 

I left that world about 15 years ago and it came as a huge relief. I think my end salary at the time was about 40K which was considered good as a graduate with over a decade of experience in a specialised field and working in three languages for a subsidiary of Siemens, where it has to be said, the conditions were an improvement over private patent attorney firms.

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