Looking for case handler / adjudicator role, hoping to escape Brexit

55 posts in this topic

I have been working in London, basically dealing with complaints or reviewing sales of financial products, being paid around £200 per day.  This kind of thing:

https://www.reed.co.uk/jobs/short-term-lending-adjudicator/38326696?source=searchResults#/jobs/financial-ombudsman-service-43357/p43357?sortby=DisplayDate

 

Can I do anything similar in English in Frankfurt?  


I don't have a job at all right now and if I could go and do something similar in Frankfurt, it would give me the benefit of maybe an EU passport after Brexit (I only have UK passport).

My German is poor, maybe A2, but trying to learn.. 

 

Thank you

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10 minutes ago, CuriousAidan said:

It would give me the benefit of maybe an EU passport after Brexit (I only have UK passport).

My German is poor, maybe A2, but trying to learn..

 

They will be queuing up to employ you, definitely. And you will be the first to get an EU passport. Let us know how this pans out, Aidan.

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OP- 

Use TT search function- key words

Check UK gov website re moving to and living in Germany

Search for requirements fr applying for German Citizenship

Research Healthcare coverage in Germany- no NHS here

Check meaning of "Free movement for Eu  citizens.

 

Any and all may/ will/can be affected, changed byy Brexit, as a no longer EU citizen.

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23 hours ago, optimista said:

They will be queuing up to employ you, definitely. And you will be the first to get an EU passport. Let us know how this pans out, Aidan.

Hmmm. Not sure if you speak from a position of having some knowledge about the jobs market and so consider it will be harder than expected for someone in my position, or whether this is "bantz"?! 

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23 hours ago, RedMidge said:

OP- 

Use TT search function- key words

Check UK gov website re moving to and living in Germany

Search for requirements fr applying for German Citizenship

Research Healthcare coverage in Germany- no NHS here

Check meaning of "Free movement for Eu  citizens.

 

Any and all may/ will/can be affected, changed byy Brexit, as a no longer EU citizen.

Thank you I will do that. From a Brexit point of view I guess that while there are no guarantees, it's better to be registered in the EU country even without a job, than stuck in UK.

 

With regard to the free movement point, is this basically that you have to find a job within 3 months or "Raus"?

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On 7/22/2019, 4:47:24, CuriousAidan said:

...

I don't have a job at all right now and if I could go and do something similar in Frankfurt, it would give me the benefit of maybe an EU passport after Brexit (I only have UK passport).

...

...

 

 

Are you aware that it will take between 6 (under exceptional circumstances) and 8 years before you would be eligible for a German passport?

 

Are you aware that once the UK leaves the EU, then if you apply for a German passport you will have to give up your UK citizenship & passport?

 

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10 minutes ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

 

Are you aware that it will take between 6 (under exception circumstances) and 8 years before you would be eligible for a German passport?

 

Are you aware that once the UK leaves the EU, then if you apply for a German passport you will have to give up your UK citizenship & passport?

 

Thanks, I thought it was 5 years but I take your point.

 

I wasn't aware about renouncing UK citizenship and passport but that is indeed worrying.

 

 

 

 

 

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38 minutes ago, CuriousAidan said:

... you have to find a job within 3 months or "Raus"?

After Brexit, even if you have a job you would have to have a whole load of other paperwork fixed or "raus". Residence permit, tax number, social security number, (chicken and egg sitatuion getting one without the other can be challenging) medical insurance - and how would you be paying for that? It is hundreds of Euros a month. At the risk of discouraging you, a reality check is not going to make you a happy bunny. Are many people trying to jump ship at 5 to midnight?

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You can use your EHIC card as a visitor for 3months( as a member of an EU country), but once you register you will need to deal with German health insurance coverage . 

The amts will not be too friendly if you register and arrive as an unemployed. Yes, they could tell you to go home!

If you are claiming JSA in the UK, it may be possible to transfer this to Germany for the remainder of ? 3 months. All clearly stated on UK giv. Website.

And once Brexit is a reality, your status as a non EU citizen may require a whole new set of rules. Many expat Brits are already having to apply for permanent residence visas, if they have not already gained German citizenship. 

 

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4 hours ago, optimista said:

After Brexit, even if you have a job you would have to have a whole load of other paperwork fixed or "raus". Residence permit, tax number, social security number, (chicken and egg sitatuion getting one without the other can be challenging) medical insurance - and how would you be paying for that? It is hundreds of Euros a month. At the risk of discouraging you, a reality check is not going to make you a happy bunny. Are many people trying to jump ship at 5 to midnight?

Thanks for this - doesn't seem straightforward. That said, I heard that Germany has welcomed people who are not literate in any language, and with the help of associations I guess they have overcome those hurdles.

 

Am budgeting 10k for language courses, 6 months accommodation, medical insurance and paperwork..

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5 hours ago, RedMidge said:

You can use your EHIC card as a visitor for 3months( as a member of an EU country), but once you register you will need to deal with German health insurance coverage . 

The amts will not be too friendly if you register and arrive as an unemployed. Yes, they could tell you to go home!

If you are claiming JSA in the UK, it may be possible to transfer this to Germany for the remainder of ? 3 months. All clearly stated on UK giv. Website.

And once Brexit is a reality, your status as a non EU citizen may require a whole new set of rules. Many expat Brits are already having to apply for permanent residence visas, if they have not already gained German citizenship. 

 

Thanks. Is amts a general word for all Government offices? They might tell me to go home but wouldn't this be illegal under the current EU rules?

 

Am not claiming JSA in the UK, I think my savings are too high.

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

Is amts a general word for all Government offices? They might tell me to go home but wouldn't this be illegal under the current EU rules?

"Amt" translates as "authority". The way it´s been used here is just English-speaker slang. The alien authority does have the right to send home even EU citizens who cannot maintain themselves (income or savings). I´m not sure about Germany (being a citizen I never had to deal with residence problems here) but in Cyprus, where I´m residing they deem an income of at least € 800 or savings of € 20000.- (or a combination of e. g. € 400.- income plus € 10000.- savings) sufficient. And in Cyprus you have to prove this when registering. Not sure whether that´s the case in Germany (EU regulations just stipulate "appropriate financial means - whatever that means) and how they monitor your financial situation (if they do). Maybe someone could share their experiences?

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On 22.7.2019, 16:47:24, CuriousAidan said:

I have been working in London, basically dealing with complaints or reviewing sales of financial products, being paid around £200 per day.  This kind of thing:

https://www.reed.co.uk/jobs/short-term-lending-adjudicator/38326696?source=searchResults#/jobs/financial-ombudsman-service-43357/p43357?sortby=DisplayDate

 

Can I do anything similar in English in Frankfurt?  

 

No.

 

Could a foreigner with broken English who does not have the reading comprehension skills to even understand laws and regulations written in English be able to do your job? The job to which you linked explicitly requires "exceptional written and verbal communication skills".

 

You should also be aware that Germany's regulatory framework for the financial sector is not as well developed as the UK's. @Starshollow has frequently bemoaned the lax financial regulation in Germany and might be able to tell you if there are any employment opportunities outside of BaFin.

 

10 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

That said, I heard that Germany has welcomed people who are not literate in any language, and with the help of associations I guess they have overcome those hurdles.

 

Most of these people will be a burden on taxpayers in the years if not decades to come.

 

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Am budgeting 10k for language courses, 6 months accommodation, medical insurance and paperwork..

 

That should be enough for 5 or 6 months and to get you to about B1/B2 German. If you budget carefully, by the time your 10k are up you should be able to find a full-time minimum wage job (the current minimum wage is 9,19€/hr and will rise to 9,35€/hr from January 1, 2020). It is not possible to determine at this time whether or not this would be sufficient for you to be allowed to stay after Brexit.

 

Do you have any formal qualifications?

 

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I would up your German at the Goethe Institute in London, it has excellent quality and is very cheap compared to lessons here.

You could apply from London and I would try and spend some time over in Germany for long weekends or weeks, try and do your job from Germany etc. 

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10 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

 They might tell me to go home but wouldn't this be illegal under the current EU rules?

 

No, it isn't. You've really done zero research before posting here. Freedom of movement means freedom to work, study, run a business or retire (if you have the independent income or pension to do that). There's no absolute right for an EU citizen to live anywhere he or she wants in the EU. In practice, removals and deportations are extremely rare, but they happen, and they can certainly "tell you to leave", although they'll just leave it at that. France, for example, has been notorious for deporting EU citizens that resided in France simply because it's more profitable to beg there than in Romania or Bulgaria. That's perfectly legal because begging is not one of the categories under which an EU citizen has the right to settle in another member state.

 

 
 
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11 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

[...] I heard that Germany has welcomed people who are not literate in any language, and with the help of associations I guess they have overcome those hurdles.

 

Are you talking about refugees fleeing war? You aren't a refugee.

Many have overcome those hurdles (I've personally met some), but some will probably just remain marginalized, unemployed or underemployed for the rest of their lives, at the cost of the German taxpayer.

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5 hours ago, black1 said:

I would up your German at the Goethe Institute in London, it has excellent quality and is very cheap compared to lessons here.

You could apply from London and I would try and spend some time over in Germany for long weekends or weeks, try and do your job from Germany etc. 

Yes but I don't actually have a job.. From a quick check online, VHS in Frankfurt seems about half the price of Goethe in London.

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7 hours ago, engelchen said:

No.

 

Could a foreigner with broken English who does not have the reading comprehension skills to even understand laws and regulations written in English be able to do your job? The job to which you linked explicitly requires "exceptional written and verbal communication skills".

 

 

I take your point, thank you. I was just thinking that there would be some fully English-speaking workplaces where poor German would not restrict me to a low pay job.

 

7 hours ago, engelchen said:

That should be enough for 5 or 6 months and to get you to about B1/B2 German. If you budget carefully, by the time your 10k are up you should be able to find a full-time minimum wage job (the current minimum wage is 9,19€/hr and will rise to 9,35€/hr from January 1, 2020). It is not possible to determine at this time whether or not this would be sufficient for you to be allowed to stay after Brexit.

 

Do you have any formal qualifications?

 

This is about what I could earn at McDonalds here. As there appear to be many Brits in Berlin doing jobs at a similar pay, I guess Germany would not immediately get rid of us upon Brexit.

 

My qualifications are

- an arts degree

- Chartered Insurance Institute courses in financial planning / advice especially pensions, life assurance and tax (https://www.cii.co.uk/learning/qualifications/diploma-in-financial-planning-qualification/)

 

I can see that the above may not fit too closely into the German jobs market, however if there were some American companies which require people to review files of some nature, I might be able to use the experience I have?!

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17 hours ago, CuriousAidan said:

... Germany has welcomed people...

Am budgeting 10k..

Here's an observation on the cultural nuances of the word "welcome".

In an Anglo-Saxon context it suggests others will be forthcoming, meet you at least half way and generally be interested and proactive in helping you and concerned about your well-being and welfare.

In a teutonic and specifically civil and administrative context, it amounts more to being tolerated while you navigate the muddy waters largely unaided. IME iindifference and passivity (unhelpful and obstructive if you are really unlucky) are characteristic attitudes you will likely meet when dealing with the authorities.

 

I recommend you read TT for culture shock and homesickness.

 

Your budget is an absolute minimum. Dunno what you are going to be eating or how you plan to get around. Third party insurance (Haftpflicht) is an absolute must as people in Germany have lawyer insurance and run to them at the drop of a hat. Another cultural difference.

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Not sure how to quote from a different thread but this is what vmelchers said in 2013: 

 

In terms of career, I came here with no knowledge of German on a Youth Mobility visa from Canada, valid for one year. I quickly was hired by a recruitment agency and started working at the European Central Bank after 2 months of landing. To this day, I picked up some German but have managed fairly well without it - career wise. In terms of figuring 'stuff' out such as banking, city hall, medical, insurance, etc, I could not do it without my German partner.

 

Was she exceptionally lucky?!

 

 

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43 minutes ago, CuriousAidan said:

 

I take your point, thank you. I was just thinking that there would be some fully English-speaking workplaces where poor German would not restrict me to a low pay job.

 

There are jobs that don't require German, however, these usually require technical or other skills in demand.

 

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This is about what I could earn at McDonalds here. As there appear to be many Brits in Berlin doing jobs at a similar pay, I guess Germany would not immediately get rid of us upon Brexit.

 

As you've already noted, Germany has a surplus of unskilled/low skilled labour. It is anyone's guess what will happen with unskilled/low skilled Brits without other ties to Germany after Brexit. It'll depend heavily of the political climate at the time.

 

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My qualifications are

- an arts degree

 

Germans has not quite caught on to the fact that it is possible to work in other fields that the ones one has studied (Quereinsteiger).

 

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- Chartered Insurance Institute courses in financial planning / advice especially pensions, life assurance and tax (https://www.cii.co.uk/learning/qualifications/diploma-in-financial-planning-qualification/)

 

You'd need to know the German regs to become licensed here. Again @Starshollow or @john g. would be better informed on how well a foreigner would need to know German to obtain a license here.

 

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I can see that the above may not fit too closely into the German jobs market, however if there were some American companies which require people to review files of some nature, I might be able to use the experience I have?!

 

There is a reason why many foreigners in Germany (including many posters here) don't work in their field. Your problem is that your skills revolve around your ability to work in English and your skills don't transfer will since you don't know the local language.

 

I personally don't know of any skilled office jobs that require neither business fluent German nor technical skills. If anyone has any suggestions I would love to here them (I am currently frustrated with my job that requires writing reports in German).

 

To use a pharse coined by another TTer you are wrongly skilled for the German labour market. 

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