Relocating to Germany with german citizenship

34 posts in this topic

47 minutes ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

1. The reason why it is so difficult to find a flat in Germany and so easy to find one in Poland is, that so many Poles moved to Germany (no joke)

2. If you want to work in Germany, why are you in Berlin? You should go to Southern Germany. Berlin is the target for people who want to live on dole.

    The people in Berlin complain about the high rents not because the rents are so high, but the saleries in Berlin are so low.

 

I am not in Berlin yet. I like Berlin's proximity to my home. Actually one of the reasons I like Berlin are low rents. You can easily rent a flat for 400 euro for a month. Plenty of such flats. In Bavaria and Stuttgart and Hamburg prices are much higher. It would almost impossible to find a flat for such price. Is difference in salaries really that big? I am not doctor or engineer so I do not think in my case difference in salary would be that big so I look mostly on where I can save more and in that case it seems to be Berlin or Westpahlia, Rheinland thanks to cheaper prices. 

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19 minutes ago, Sportsman said:

I am not in Berlin yet. I like Berlin's proximity to my home.

 

Forget Berlin.

 

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Actually one of the reasons I like Berlin are low rents. You can easily rent a flat for 400 euro for a month. Plenty of such flats.

 

Although you might be able to find such cheap apartments advertised, you have very little chance of actually getting one as a newly arrived (for all intents and purposes) foreigner who is still in the Probezeit and not having a credit history in Germany. The competition is immense and very often there are as many as 50 people applying for the same apartment. 

 

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In Bavaria and Stuttgart and Hamburg prices are much higher. It would almost impossible to find a flat for such price.

 

Rents might be higher, however, there are also more job opportunities.

 

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Is difference in salaries really that big?

 

It depends on the industry.

 

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I am not doctor or engineer so I do not think in my case difference in salary would be that big so I look mostly on where I can save more and in that case it seems to be Berlin or Westpahlia, Rheinland thanks to cheaper prices. 

 

What formal qualifications do you have?

 

28 minutes ago, Sportsman said:

My grandfather has a flat in western Germany, so I could register myself there but I wanted to live closer to a border. 

 

The cities near the border to Poland generally have less employment opportunities than those in the West. 

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2 hours ago, Sportsman said:

 

Thanks for clarifying. That was really helpful. My grandfather has a flat in western Germany, so I could register myself there but I wanted to live closer to a border. 

 

So if you have a flat where you could live, why don't you start there? Once you have worked a bit and built credit you could check on jobs and housing in a more hip town.

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2 hours ago, Sportsman said:

I wanted to live closer to a border. 

 

huh?  

 

eta: ah ok, I think this is about the polish border, specifically.

 

again I will recommend a place like Leipzig as it's even cheaper than Berlin and still "east".  I think Munich would be a suicide mission.  Techs even have a hard time finding housing here.  

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58 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

huh?  

 

eta: ah ok, I think this is about the polish border, specifically.

 

again I will recommend a place like Leipzig as it's even cheaper than Berlin and still "east".  I think Munich would be a suicide mission.  Techs even have a hard time finding housing here.  

58 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

58 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

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4 hours ago, AnswerToLife42 said:

 

 

Yes, polish border. From a place like Berlin I could come visit much more frequently even or weekends. Does Leipzig have big foreign community? I have heard East Germany does not like foreigners. Even though I am "ethnic german" and hold german citizenship I do not think that would make a difference.

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2 hours ago, Sportsman said:

 

Yes, polish border. From a place like Berlin I could come visit much more frequently even or weekends.

 

If being able to go home on the weekends is the driving factor when choosing a location where to live, why do you even want to move to Germany?

 

2 hours ago, Sportsman said:

Does Leipzig have big foreign community? I have heard East Germany does not like foreigners. Even though I am "ethnic german" and hold german citizenship I do not think that would make a difference.

 

I'm going to tell you a secret that many Germans don't want to acknowledge, the importance of Vitamin B (i.e. connections) is something that shouldn't be underestimated in Germany.

 

The easiest and cheapest way for you to move to Germany is by moving in with your grandfather for a month or two so that you have a place where you can register, sort out your health insurance, open a bank account etc. Ask your grandfather even before you move to ask his friends and acquaintances if anyone knows of any jobs or small apartments that'll be free soon. As long as your grandfather is not living in a very small village in the middle of nowhere, you should also be able to find your first job relatively easily (assuming that you would be willing to take any unskilled job available).

 

Alternatively, if you really don't want to move to the city where you grandfather lives, you can try looking for a job at a hotel or resort that also provides accommodation.

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

If being able to go home on the weekends is the driving factor when choosing a location where to live, why do you even want to move to Germany?

 

 

I'm going to tell you a secret that many Germans don't want to acknowledge, the importance of Vitamin B (i.e. connections) is something that shouldn't be underestimated in Germany.

 

The easiest and cheapest way for you to move to Germany is by moving in with your grandfather for a month or two so that you have a place where you can register, sort out your health insurance, open a bank account etc. Ask your grandfather even before you move to ask his friends and acquaintances if anyone knows of any jobs or small apartments that'll be free soon. As long as your grandfather is not living in a very small village in the middle of nowhere, you should also be able to find your first job relatively easily (assuming that you would be willing to take any unskilled job available).

 

Alternatively, if you really don't want to move to the city where you grandfather lives, you can try looking for a job at a hotel or resort that also provides accommodation.

 

Not a driving factor. But biggest city in most countries means most opportunities. Why would I choose other city if the biggest city is at the same time the closest one. That would be weird if I do not have already a job in other city. Maybe Germany is different and biggest city is not the best. I have degree in economics but work on construction site by the way. Anyway thank you all for replies. I found polish site with announcements of rooms to rent to people from Poland, so it is going to be easy now. 

 

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Good for you about the rooms but you still need to register the address, open a bank account and get health insurance. If you don´t apply for public health insurance within 3 months of registering, they have no legal obligation to accept you. 

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4 minutes ago, john g. said:

Good for you about the rooms but you still need to register the address, open a bank account and get health insurance. If you don´t apply for public health insurance within 3 months of registering, they have no legal obligation to accept you. 

 

Yes, I know. Definitely gonna remember about that. 

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On 18.7.2019, 19:49:28, Sportsman said:

But biggest city in most countries means most opportunities.

 

Often, but not always.

 

On 18.7.2019, 19:49:28, Sportsman said:

Why would I choose other city if the biggest city is at the same time the closest one. That would be weird if I do not have already a job in other city. Maybe Germany is different and biggest city is not the best.

 

Berlin is slowly getting better, but it is still the economic black hole of Germany (over 30% of all households in Berlin receive welfare benefits or top ups). Don't forget that Berlin was divided by a wall for 30 years. West Berlin was supported by massive subsidises and after the war didn't have the resources to produce anything. East Berlin was for the most part too poor to even keep up with basic renovations. After reunification there was tons of money pumped into the economy for construction, but most of the (better paid) manufacturing jobs are still in the south. 

 

The largest single employer in Berlin is the Land Berlin. Most of the jobs here are in government or tourism. There is also a startup tech scene that seems to be still growing. However, the gap between the rich and the poor is also increasing. Most immigrants who don't have technical backgrounds nor speak German are stuck in poorly paid jobs without many opportunities to advance to higher paid ones due to the language barrier.

 

On 18.7.2019, 19:49:28, Sportsman said:

 

I have degree in economics but work on construction site by the way.

 

I think the city is in dire need of economists, unfortunately the city has yet to come to this conclusion. <_< The lack of foresight and planning by the ineffectual coalition is not doing much to improve the overall economy either.

 

For example, the mayor's latest brilliant (NOT!!!) plan to reduce long-term unemployment is the to subsidise up to 1000 positions in government offices, NGOs, and foundations for unemployed residents for up to 5 years. If at the end of the 5 years the participants do not have a permanent job, they will be given a job with the state. I know that the pubilc service is understaffed, but they should try increasing incentives to attract qualified candidates rather than taking on employees that no one else wants!

 

On the other hand there is a shortage of labour in the construction industry and even without formal training you should be able to find a job. Make sure to bring as many reference letters as you can.

 

On 18.7.2019, 19:49:28, Sportsman said:

I found polish site with announcements of rooms to rent to people from Poland, so it is going to be easy now.

 

Like I previously mentioned, everything is easier here if you have some connections. Just watch out for rental scams.

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OK - here's your checklist:

 

1. find housing - furnished "business" apartment will be your best bet, but a bit on the expensive side (that's what your savings are for). Air-bnb will not work for your purpose, because those places are NOT allowed to give you any long-term lease, and they will not give you a "Wohnungsgeberbescheinigung".

 

2. Anmeldung - register your address with "Bürgeramt", you'll need that for all subsequent steps

 

3. Arbeitsamt - now you go to register yourself as "arbeitsuchend", which will allow you to enroll in the "gesetzliche Krankenversicherung" (health insurance) of your choice.

 

4. start looking for a job - any job will do, and Arbeitsamt will help you with that.

 

Just on a personal note - don't focus on any "hand-outs" that you might think you're entitled to, housing- or money-wise, because anything like that would take a long time to get (time better spent on working your own way up).

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