Relocating to Germany with german citizenship

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Hi, I have german citizenship and speak quite good german. I want to move to Germany but there are some obstacles. I do not have a job yet and place to stay.  I can't get a job because I do not have a place to register my residence  And no one will rent me a flat when I don't have a job so I can't register my residence. It is a closed circle. But I have heard that with german citizenship it is possible to get a social flat. My question is, what is the name of the office that deals with such matters and how long does it approximatey take to get such a place to stay? 

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Just now, Sportsman said:

I can't get a job because I do not have a place to register my residence

 

false.  you could in theory, as you don't need a German address to get a job. I did and I'm not even German.

 

health insurance is the problem.  we have threads about the problems german citizens who have never (or not for a long time) lived here have in this regard.  do a search.

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Just now, john g. said:

Where have you been health insured till now, Sportsman?

Till now my insurance has been payed by my employer. I assume it is similar in Germany. 

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Which country, Sportsman? I have a  hunch it´s the USA and private insurance...

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That´s good! It means you can sign up for German public health insurance as someone temporarily living off savings but you need to prove you have been publicly insured in Poland till now. If you are not working, it costs around 190 euros a month. If you become an employee, your status changes, and you share the costs 50/50 with the employer.

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5 minutes ago, john g. said:

That´s good! It means you can sign up for German public health insurance as someone temporarily living off savings but you need to prove you have been publicly insured in Poland till now. If you are not working, it costs around 190 euros a month. If you become an employee, your status changes, and you share the costs 50/50 with the employer.

 

So should I go first to Wohnungsamt or Arbeitsamt ? Would I get some place to stay if I have german citizenship?

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Not my area of expertise, but why not go to both places? You need a place to live and a job! But also walk into a public health insurance office eg TK, DAK and present yourself. You have to get health insured!

 

Please note you should tell them you are currently living off savings.

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But I have heard that with german citizenship it is possible to get a social flat. My question is, what is the name of the office that deals with such matters and how long does it approximatey take to get such a place to stay? 

 

It takes months to find social housing in Berlin. 

 

Although there are homeless shelters here, I would recommend saving funds to finance your move.

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I'd suggest:

 

anmelden

health insurance

arbeitsamt (or just get a job on  your own)

 

or the way I did it:

find a job

arrange a move to a temporary apartment

anmelden

get residence permit (you don't need that)

get health insurance

get tax id

start job and give them all the results from previous steps.

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I wish it was as easy as it is in Poland to rent a flat. You pay the money upfront and you have it. In Germany it seems to be extremely hard to get it that way without having already a steady job from what I have read, that's why I hoped that with citizenship I could try to get that social flat. I thought about wohnen auf zeit but the prices are crazy. Pretty much just apartaments for like over 1000 euro for a month, 

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hostel would be the cheapest way, though I think some have limits on how long you can stay.  You might have to move around.

 

that or a WG.

 

eta: it would be wise to start in a city that can register you immediately (from what I've seen on threads here Berlin can't seem to get it done even within the two week "mandatory" window) and which has less housing pressure.  Leipzig is cheap and housing is plentiful.  Dresden is also probably better than Berlin.

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3 hours ago, Sportsman said:

I wish it was as easy as it is in Poland to rent a flat. You pay the money upfront and you have it. In Germany it seems to be extremely hard to get it that way without having already a steady job from what I have read, that's why I hoped that with citizenship I could try to get that social flat. I thought about wohnen auf zeit but the prices are crazy. Pretty much just apartaments for like over 1000 euro for a month, 

 

It's not that easy to get a social flat. Even people who are on benefits mostly rent on the open market but the benefits office pays their rent for them. 

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I´m currently staying where I used to live before I left Germany - Würzburg area. There is a huge shortage of labour. It will be easy to find a job there if you have command of German. Unemployment rate is 1,6 %. In March my family rented out a shop in Würzburg which needed to be changed  to fit a barber shop. Our tenant could still not open because for almost 3 months he couldn´t find craftsmen to do the work. I´ve been struggling to find someone to clear out the house I sold for more than 2 weeks. Shops have been closing down completely or for one day per week because they don´t have enough staff. Here is just an example of someone receiving tips for job opportunities in a small town outside Würzburg on facebook (look for the posting by Kim Kevin Bauer) .

If I was looking for a job I´d rather look in Bavaria than Berlin. It´s nicer there anyway.

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13 hours ago, Sportsman said:

I wish it was as easy as it is in Poland to rent a flat. You pay the money upfront and you have it. In Germany it seems to be extremely hard to get it that way without having already a steady job from what I have read,

 

Renters in Germany have very strong rights and it is difficult for a landlord to get even a non-paying tenant out. Therefore, most landlords are very choosy when selecting tenants. Furthermore, in many cities there are more people looking to rent than apartments available so landlords can afford to take their time and choose a tenant.

 

Quote

that's why I hoped that with citizenship I could try to get that social flat. 

 

I don't think you understand how things work here. Since you wrote Berlin in your location, I'll try to explain how it works here in Berlin. Keep in mind that Germany is a federal country and the situation in other cities could be different.

 

Berlin used to have many apartments that were actually owned indirectly by the state. After the fall of the wall, however, the city sold many of these apartments. There was a time when welfare recipients could apply at the welfare office and get an apartment from the city. Now welfare recipients have to apply at the welfare office for welfare, but find their own apartments (and then go to the welfare office for approval of the rental contract).

 

It is possible to apply for a WBS in order to access subsidised housing, however, first you need to register in the city (anmelden) and then apply for the WBS. If you are not registered in Berlin, you cannot apply for a WBS. The processing time for a WBS is anywhere from 3 - 12 weeks depending on the Bezirk. Once you have a WBS, you need to look for an apartment yourself. There are more people with a WBS than apartments available and most landlords still prefer WBS tenants who are employed.

 

 

Quote

I thought about wohnen auf zeit but the prices are crazy. Pretty much just apartaments for like over 1000 euro for a month, 

 

How much money have you saved for the move? Unless you have friends or family in Germany where you can stay, you are going to need funds to finance your move.

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1. The reason why it is so difficult to find a flat in Germany and so easy to find one in Poland is, that so many Poles moved to Germany (no joke)

2. If you want to work in Germany, why are you in Berlin? You should go to Southern Germany. Berlin is the target for people who want to live on dole.

    The people in Berlin complain about the high rents not because the rents are so high, but the saleries in Berlin are so low.

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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

Renters in Germany have very strong rights and it is difficult for a landlord to get even a non-paying tenant out. Therefore, most landlords are very choosy when selecting tenants. Furthermore, in many cities there are more people looking to rent than apartments available so landlords can afford to take their time and choose a tenant.

 

 

I don't think you understand how things work here. Since you wrote Berlin in your location, I'll try to explain how it works here in Berlin. Keep in mind that Germany is a federal country and the situation in other cities could be different.

 

Berlin used to have many apartments that were actually owned indirectly by the state. After the fall of the wall, however, the city sold many of these apartments. There was a time when welfare recipients could apply at the welfare office and get an apartment from the city. Now welfare recipients have to apply at the welfare office for welfare, but find their own apartments (and then go to the welfare office for approval of the rental contract).

 

It is possible to apply for a WBS in order to access subsidised housing, however, first you need to register in the city (anmelden) and then apply for the WBS. If you are not registered in Berlin, you cannot apply for a WBS. The processing time for a WBS is anywhere from 3 - 12 weeks depending on the Bezirk. Once you have a WBS, you need to look for an apartment yourself. There are more people with a WBS than apartments available and most landlords still prefer WBS tenants who are employed.

 

 

 

 

How much money have you saved for the move? Unless you have friends or family in Germany where you can stay, you are going to need funds to finance your move.

 

Thanks for clarifying. That was really helpful. My grandfather has a flat in western Germany, so I could register myself there but I wanted to live closer to a border. 

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