is it generally safe to share one's birth date?

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I'm applying to adopt a cat and they want my contact info, of course, but also my birth date. 

 

normally I am not asked for this on anything other than very official paperwork (eg with the government) or occasionally for a website that wants to use it for age verification (via schufa).

 

Is it safe to give this data in tandem with my address?  The organization seems like it's on the up and up, but since they don't have a physical presence or shelter in the area, it's hard to verify first hand.

 

so what's the worst that can happen? Should I give it or not?

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yes I plan to do that, but given I'm dealing with a secretary of sorts, I kinda doubt she will have a real answer for that aside from "well it's on the form so you should give it"

 

the question is more general, eg what mischief can someone make using my address AND birth date, as opposed to just the address alone?

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Perhaps they are wary of adoptions with very young, or elderly? ( not you- you are in the prime of life!)

Yes-I would ask why.

PS- cute photos will be required here!

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Age verification / minors aside, date of birth, combined with a name is valuable information for fraudsters. On name and birthdate alone, this helps get the first foot in the door for larger and more elaborate fraud activities.

 

I've seen many a consumer documentary where either with just a name and address, or just a name and birthdate, great damage can be done. It's also quite easy to go through your rubbish bins and piece together a birthdate based on arbitrary information (discarded birthday cards, birthday related gift / spa bookings etc...) And as for social media - would you give your name and date of birth to a newspaper or for a BBC programme? No? Well stop including it in your tweets, facebooks etc...

 

Saying all that, the Betriebsrat in most companies does what it pleases and advertises EVERYONE's name and birthdate on a Waehlerliste in a pinboard where anyone can see it - including visitors!

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12 minutes ago, RedMidge said:

Perhaps they are wary of adoptions with very young, or elderly? ( not you- you are in the prime of life!)

Yes-I would ask why.

PS- cute photos will be required here!

 

photos of me?  

 

or the cat? :) 

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9 minutes ago, paulwork said:

Age verification / minors aside, date of birth, combined with a name is valuable information for fraudsters. On name and birthdate alone, this helps get the first foot in the door for larger and more elaborate fraud activities.

 

I've seen many a consumer documentary where either with just a name and address, or just a name and birthdate, great damage can be done. It's also quite easy to go through your rubbish bins and piece together a birthdate based on arbitrary information (discarded birthday cards, birthday related gift / spa bookings etc...) And as for social media - would you give your name and date of birth to a newspaper or for a BBC programme? No? Well stop including it in your tweets, facebooks etc...

 

Saying all that, the Betriebsrat in most companies does what it pleases and advertises EVERYONE's name and birthdate on a Waehlerliste in a pinboard where anyone can see it - including visitors!

Lucky Toytown have got my date of birth wrong on my profile page! This happened when the " great transformation " happened the other year! So no spam, fraudsters?:D

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@paulwork yes, this is kinda what I was worried about.

 

I can't do much to protect my address, at least insofar as my last name at least is on the bell.  But I do feel more nervous about the birth date.  I don't put it on any social media profiles or similar.

 

They surely don't need to verify my age in writing as they send out an inspector to meet me and check out my apartment to make sure it's a suitable home and that I'm a suitable carer.

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1 minute ago, john g. said:

BOTH, Lisa! We are a nosey lot on here!:lol:

 

wellll...if I get the cat I'll do it.  Both of us together.  if she'll let me pick her up (she's already grown and will have her own things to say about...everything I'm sure).

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Great news that you are adopting a cat Lisa 😊. If you are wary about giving your date of birth, just put month and year...usually suffices on written form.  You can always show your ID too. Often heard that DOB anywhere on social media is a risk.

 

All the best with your new kitty.

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I'm just putting the year.  Makes it 364 times more difficult for them to guess it correctly instead of a mere 30 times :)

 

I do hope it works out.  Though I am a firm believer that I find the right pets at the right time and in the right place so if this doesn't pan out, I'll just keep looking.  I'm finally over losing my last cat so regardless of how this particular adoption turns out, a new furry friend is a go.

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5 minutes ago, john g. said:

A deal´s a deal!!!

 

my word is my bond.  no kidding.  I'm not even drunk :)

 

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4 hours ago, lisa13 said:

Is it safe to give this data in tandem with my address?  The organization seems like it's on the up and up, but since they don't have a physical presence or shelter in the area, it's hard to verify first hand.

 

Contrary to your country, Europe is much safer against identity theft.

 

Please, anybody, tell me how giving birthday information is a potential issue!

 

I keep reminding myself that in Portugal, 10 years ago, I could get all information about a company, including owners personal data, cars, etc, by paying 50€.

If people could use that information for identity theft, they would just ask companies that specialize in that, they don´t need to ask you!

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3 hours ago, paulwork said:

I've seen many a consumer documentary where either with just a name and address, or just a name and birthdate, great damage can be done.

Where? US? What the hell can they do with that in Europe?

COMMON! Do you know how I can guess a person´s birthday? I go into a restaurant, spot a birthday, see who blows the candles and check the numbers on the candles! Should we stop doing that??

 

Please tell me a single thing that can be compromising in Germany, with a name and a birth date! I have been here for 6 years and never saw one!

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^ It is about data mining. Once you get hold of the first bits of info, it's easier to unlock more. If you have a name and birthdate, you can sometimes e.g. find out a telephone number, or address. You can then call the individual, posing as a bank, Microsoft, whatever. You don't even need to know whether the persun has any cunnection to that bank/organization. You try your luck.

 

Make enough calls, and you eventually stumble across someone who takes the bait and volunteers more info about themselves. That's a very old skool form of fraud, but is often used in combination with digital. Gangs operate all across the world selling bundles of data on the web, dark web, take your pick.

 

First question a card company asks is "Zur Absicherung, bitte sagen sie uns Ihr geburtsdatum und ..." 

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If it is a physical form then I would just omit it and tell them when you hand it in that you don't see a valid reason why they would need this, that you are worried about fraud, and according the EU GDPR law then they must have a valid reason for needing this.  If it is just to verify your age then they can see by looking that you are neither too young nor too old.

Of course they might have a valid reason, but then they have to inform you.

 

If it is an electric form and you must enter it, then just enter a false DoB.  Worst case scenario, later you can just say, oh sorry I made a mistake.  It is easy to do on electronic forms!

 

They might kick up a fuss, and might not be happy, but in the end if you stand your ground then I'm sure they won't not let you adopt over this little thing.

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, MikeMelga said:

Contrary to your country, Europe is much safer against identity theft.

 

Please, anybody, tell me how giving birthday information is a potential issue!

 

I keep reminding myself that in Portugal, 10 years ago, I could get all information about a company, including owners personal data, cars, etc, by paying 50€.

If people could use that information for identity theft, they would just ask companies that specialize in that, they don´t need to ask you!

 

that is why I'm asking, I don't know how risky this is aside from the fact that I know that everything really important requires a birth date to verify.  

 

hell, someone opened a fake amazon.de account with my name and address, and possibly my birth date - I'm not sure how they did it as amazon wouldn't tell me anything about the fake account or how it came to be (funny - their reason was they were "protecting" the details of that account since I could not provide the email address associated with it - ha!), they just shut it down and waived the outstanding collection letter they had sent me for unpaid merch.  Amazon is likely (hopefully) a special case and an easy target, but I am actually concerned about throwing data around willy nilly if it can be misused. 

 

the whole point of the question is to get a reality check on that. 

 

and yes identity theft is a thing in the US, too.  But I don't care if it's "worse" or "better" as I don't live there.  I live HERE :)  I remember a time when no one thought twice about giving their social security number, which is the lynchpin for identity theft over there.  Obviously things have changed but the point is obvious, I hope.

 

 

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