Americans who speak Elizabethan English

16 posts in this topic

Native Americans, English sailors and pirates all came together on Ocracoke Island in North Carolina to create the only American dialect that is not identified as American.

 

“I'd never been called a dingbatter until I went to Ocracoke for the first time. I've spent a good part of my life in North Carolina, but I'm still learning how to speak the ‘Hoi Toider’ brogue. The people here just have their own way of speaking: it's like someone took Elizabethan English, sprinkled in some Irish tones and 1700s Scottish accents, then mixed it all up with pirate slang. But the Hoi Toider dialect is more than a dialect. It's also a culture, one that's slowly fading away. With each generation, fewer people play meehonkey, cook the traditional foods or know what it is to be mommucked.”

 

www.bbc.com/travel/story/20190623-the-us-island-that-speaks-elizabethan-english

 

Are there any Toytowners from Ocracoke Island?

 

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

Native Americans, English sailors and pirates all came together on Ocracoke Island in North Carolina to create the only American dialect that is not identified as American.

 

“I'd never been called a dingbatter until I went to Ocracoke for the first time. I've spent a good part of my life in North Carolina, but I'm still learning how to speak the ‘Hoi Toider’ brogue. The people here just have their own way of speaking: it's like someone took Elizabethan English, sprinkled in some Irish tones and 1700s Scottish accents, then mixed it all up with pirate slang. But the Hoi Toider dialect is more than a dialect. It's also a culture, one that's slowly fading away. With each generation, fewer people play meehonkey, cook the traditional foods or know what it is to be mommucked.”

 

www.bbc.com/travel/story/20190623-the-us-island-that-speaks-elizabethan-english

 

Are there any Toytowners from Ocracoke Island?

 

 

 

I have been called a dingbat in Australia!  I watched a great BBC series" Story of English". 

All the different accents  can be traced to when the various emigrant left the UK and Ireland, and background and class affected each wave.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mother's family arrived in the (now) US in 1620.  She called a co-worker a dingbat, and I can remember her using the term earlier, during my girlhood.  My family also still uses the pre-Hanoverian succession 'eether' and 'neether' instead of 'eyether' and 'nyether'.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dingbat is not a fringe word in the US

 

Probably at least in part because of "All in the Family" wherein Archie regularly called Edith "dingbat" as if it were her name.

 

Still, I heard it regularly growing up on the east coast.

 

But the east coast especially has a dizzying array of accents even in close proximity. Like, people from Brooklyn, Queens, Staten island etc all have different accents. Boston and surrounds are even more varied and often bizarre in American speech, eg "lawf" for laugh, "cawf" for calf. Only a few still pronounce it this way so it's kind of surprising when you hear it, as the nasal 'a', is used for everything else!

 

If anyone can explain the origins of how my name got morphed into "Leeser" by a lot of these people who otherwise refuse to enunciate their R's (paahk the cahhh in the bahn) I'll buy you a beer :)

 

 

 

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

If anyone can explain the origins of how my name got morphed into "Leeser" by a lot of these people who otherwise refuse to enunciate their R's (paahk the cahhh in the bahn) I'll buy you a beer :)

 

It is similar to the Brits who drop actual r's and then add them onto the ends if words where there are none. 

 

I'll take an Augi, please.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

I'll take an Augi, please.

 

my pleasure :)

 

yes I know it all comes from some bastardized version of some kind of english that trickled down from the mother ship.  I remember listening to a really interesting talk on NPR once with a guy who has made a career of studying the origins of east coast accents and it was pretty fascinating.  Actually I'd like to learn more about it myself.

 

I haven't had anyone from the UK call me Leeser (yet) - just brooklynites and a couple of really old-school bostonites.

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love it when the Brit news says "Obamer".

 

ETA - preceded by Ba rack. Just like Schumacker instead of Schumacher.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very interesting article, White Rose of Yorkshire. Thanks for posting.

 

Some people from that part of the world interviewed here.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Frau Fruit: I have just realised that I really do pronounce Mr Obma's name as Mr Obamer. should I say Mr Obamah?

 

@ Lorelei: If I heard the people in the film talking on the street, I would never in a million years think they were Americans.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

@ Frau Fruit: I have just realised that I really do pronounce Mr Obma's name as Mr Obamer. should I say Mr Obamah?

 

 

 

If there is no r, why would you add one?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Example  "America is a funny country, Brits often say America ris a funny country.     Like slurring your words.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, snowingagain said:

Example  "America is a funny country, Brits often say America ris a funny country.     Like slurring your words.  

Probably some Brits from Yorkshire or Birmingham complaining about how hard it is to understand someone from Minnesota

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, snowingagain said:

Example  "America is a funny country, Brits often say America ris a funny country.     Like slurring your words.  

 

I am not a native English speaker, but If you pay attention, you will too notice that Brits tend to put this non-existing "r" as a "bridge" only between a word that ends and the next one that starts with a vowel. Hence "America-r-is a funny country."

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, snowingagain said:

Example  "America is a funny country, Brits often say Americar is a funny country.     Like slurring your words.  

FIFY

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, snowingagain said:

Example  "America is a funny country, Brits often say America ris a funny country.     Like slurring your words.  

We all know the true pronounciation nowadays is Murica which must be said while drooling and wearing a MAGA hat.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now