33 posts in this topic

18 hours ago, dstanners said:

the term "UWB" is a common description for Ultra Wide Band/bandwidth.

UWB is "descriptive" and as such, the trade mark is unenforceable (for any IP smart ar$es out there, I've made that example purely due to trade marks

 

 

as a smart ar$e... 

 

'common descriptive' is another way of saying 'generic'    a generic can't be protected.  though you could protect your distinctive logo or stylized display of the generic term. 

 

if it is merely descriptive, and not generic, then you could potentially acquire secondary meaning through extensive use or advertising and earn distinctiveness that enables protection.  but it's not an optimal starting point.  A descriptive mark is inherently weak, and any scope of protection is going to be narrow. 

 

marketing teams love marks that tell potential consumers what a product is.  there is something to be said for that.  but the most protectable mark is one that is arbitrary or coined.  like AMAZON for online books sales (arbitrary) or EXXON for petroleum products (coined / made up). 

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My Tardis has arrived. Luck it's bigger on the inside, cos I gotta lot of stuff to cram into it.

 

tardis.jpg.50ab1b004bb1a0bff263d6348c1ce

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Once I choose a product name, I will of course copyright same. I also have a few patents to apply for. 

 

However I'm not really worried about some other company ripping off the trade mark. It's not something you purchase without thinking about like the Amazon echo. It's more like a Tesla. In that you carefully examine the spec.

 

Nobody is going to buy a Golden Shanghai Teslo with 200km range, because they thought it was as good as a Tesla with 500km range.

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On 6/30/2019, 3:03:11, MadAxeMurderer said:

 

 

Nobody is going to buy a Golden Shanghai Teslo with 200km range, because they thought it was as good as a Tesla with 500km range.

Your faith in people is much greater than mine.

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Oh I don't have faith in people in general. Especially flat Earthers and climate change deniers

 

but I do have faith in purchasers and engineers

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Ok a couple of points:

On 6/30/2019, 2:03:11, MadAxeMurderer said:
On 6/30/2019, 2:03:11, MadAxeMurderer said:

Once I choose a product name, I will of course copyright same

In Ireland copyright subsists as soon as you create the artistic work. Whether a name is artistic is questionable. That is why people tend to prefer trade marks.

There may well be copyright in the design of your end product (if it is something you have created yourself), and if so, your first steps should be to keep a record that you have created it and when you have created it (you can then use that (c) sign to show that you are asserting copyright. You can also try to register it as a design in the EU which gives you some greater protection. The downside to copyright is that if someone creates something which is the same as your product, but can show that they did it without copying your product, then they have not infringed your copyright. By contrast, rights like patents and trade marks are much stronger because they give you a monopoly right to that that item, once your mark or patent is registered.

 

On 6/30/2019, 2:03:11, MadAxeMurderer said:

Nobody is going to buy a Golden Shanghai Teslo with 200km range, because they thought it was as good as a Tesla with 500km range

Conversely, this is actually a good example of why it is sensible to protect your brand. In your example, there can be little doubt that the Golden Shanghai Teslo producing company is trying to profit from the goodwill developed by Tesla. If they are successful in selling some low spec cheap alternative to the Tesla, what it is actually telling Tesla is that they should stop Teslo from trading off the Tesla reputation, and perhaps create a budget version of the Tesla themselves.

 

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On 6/30/2019, 3:03:11, MadAxeMurderer said:

Once I choose a product name, I will of course copyright same. I also have a few patents to apply for. 

However I'm not really worried about some other company ripping off the trade mark.

 

dstanner is correct.

 

copyright protects expression  = movies, books, songs, recordings, plays

 

patent protects original ideas = new machines and methods

 

trademark protects indicator of origin = symbols, logos, brand names, colors, sounds, smells

 

trademarks can be forever, they can continue to be renewed as long as one continues to use them

 

copyright and patent protection is for a limited term

 

all are forms of a government-granted monopoly

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I've integrated my Tardis. The only thing just there for show is the vertical white box at the back.

 

Everything else actually has a purpose. The Tardis has a USB hub, and a pyboard with display and a dial. The pyboard allows you to connect  DUTs (Device Under Test) over many kinds of interface: UART, SPI, I2C maybe even GPIB.

 

The dial let's you choose the time shift.

 

In the picture there are three DUTs all connected to the flat metal box which is a kind of crossbar.

 

tt.jpg.3ed2e2e48dc2f6f9b68f9450e9eb4410.

 

I'm thinking of calling the company VLTM (Very Limited Time Machines)

 

Quote

VLSI Technology, Inc., was a company that designed and manufactured custom and semi-custom integrated circuits (ICs). The company was based in Silicon Valley, with headquarters at 1109 McKay Drive in San Jose. Along with LSI Logic, VLSI Technology defined the leading edge of the application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) business, which accelerated the push of powerful embedded systems into affordable products.

VLSI was acquired in June 1999, for about $1 billion, by Philips Electronics and is today a part of the Philips spin-off NXP Semiconductors.

 

So VLTM is a kind of a pun on that kind of name. Very limited is the opposite of very large. VLSI means Very Large Scale Integration.

 

So am I onto something, or has 24 hour daylight finally fried my brain?

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Take care with using the Tardis in the final device, BBC worldwide protects Doctor Who Merch fairly heavily from what I understand.

 

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Good point but it's an off the shelf Tardis bought for €30 from a German company and licensed by the BBC.

 

Surely I can buy a properly licensed product and do what I want with it including cutting bits off it, and sticking more bits in?

 

Anyway I am in contact with the BBC and will send them the picture above. 

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You are doing the right thing by contacting them, I hope you are right and you can just resell it, but I know it can be a problem to sell modified licensed goods in some circumstances.

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I am in contact with:

 

Quote

 

Head of Brand Licensing

Consumer Products

 

1 Television Centre, 101 Wood Lane

London W12 7FA

bbcstudios.com

 

 

While I appreciate pappnase's advice I was also hoping for feedback on VLTM as a company name.

 

Right now it seems clever and more exciting than Uwbtest. Clever and exciting is often a bad idea. Anyway I have the domain vltm.eu

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