Moving To Germany [Advice needed]

17 posts in this topic

Hi everyone.

 

It's been ten years since I last came here. But made such an amazing friend while doing so. Ok guys, I'll cut straight to the chase. It's going to be quite a read, but please be patient with me. My name is Daniel and I have a daughter and a partner who live in Germany [Saxony]. After a long hiatus in our relationship and reconciling, we have decided it would be better for us to be a family fully (meaning I relocate from Scotland to Germany). My situation however is very special. I am registered disabled in the UK and unable to work (Mental and physical issues). Also as Brexit looms, I have no idea what will lay ahead for me. My partner has generously offered to financially accommodate us so I can stay at home and recover.

 

I have taken the liberty of drawing up a 'to do' list, so to speak. Now, to my understanding, I would be eligible for a 'Temporary Residence Permit' as I am a father to a German national. But, could someone kindly give me advice to perhaps putting my list of what I need to do in the correct order or possibly add suggestions that I will need to do?

 

THINGS TO DO FIRST

1. Go to police and notify them on where I am staying and that I will be here for longer than three months
2. Go to Town Hall and register my address
3. Open up a bank account
4. Check for VISA? - Do I need one after a certain amount of time? Am I eligible?
5. Residence Permit - Ausländerbehörde
6. Get Health Insurance ?
7. Rent Agreement/Einzugsbestätigung
8. Social Sercurity rights? (Get DWP certificate on how long I've claimed benefits for) (Health certificate)
9. Convert drivers license into german

 

I will be more than happy to elaborate on anything or give more information.

 

Many Thanks

 

Danny

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17 minutes ago, Thefisherman said:

1. Go to police and notify them on where I am staying and that I will be here for longer than three months

 

Don't do that - the police are not the slightest bit interested in you. I've never been to the police here

Its not a police state here.

 

Update:  Well, hardly ever: at one time I visited police headquarters in Munich & Essen several times to install computer equipment.

In Munich they even gave me the master key to pretty much the whole building!

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I think he meant the Einwohnermeldeamt, which is a combination of point 1 and 2 and has nothing to do with the police.

 

You don't immediately have to convert your license by the way, but check to see how long you can drive on your UK license as it varies quite a bit based on country, or in my case, on which American State you are from. I thought mine was good for a year and then I found out I had been driving illegally for 6 months!

 

 Why do you need a rental agreement if you will be staying with your partner? I think you would need this first, otherwise it would be hard to give an address for a bank account or a residency permit. 

 

I think you will also need to have your disability recognized here (Schwerbehindertenausweis).  I doubt they would accept this from UK.

 

As far as the Visa, etc.  goes, who knows?  Depends on what is agreed to on Brexit, I suppose.  Probably the worst possible time to move from the UK to Germany, but on the other hand, maybe you DO want to move before the whole thing hits the fan and you can get grandfathered in.  

 

One of the simplest (and equally most difficult) thing you can do is to get married.  That would make things 100x easier.  Depending on your situation, however, this could be terrible advice.  You should never marry just for a residency permit.  

 

None of this should be taken as legal advice and should be taken with all the seriousness of "Some dude on the Internet said..."  Check with the relevant offices,etc.  to confirm everything you are told.

 

Oh, and a piece of general advice - take every appointment and form very seriously.  I prepare for my appointments with government offices like I am going to a job interview.  I have everything filled out, signed, notarized, etc.  I have read through and understood everything they have sent me.  I have made copies of everything.  I make sure I have all of the necessary IDs and documents and then probably some I don't need.  I have everything in order and can just whip out what they ask for when they ask for it.  I have exact cash for all the fees etc.  This might sound a bit excessive, but it makes things go sooo much easier, faster, etc.  Last time I went, I was in and out in half an hour.  Some poor slob who came in after me had been there the whole day because he had not prepared.

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As long as the UK is still in the EU, you just have to do the stuff required of EU citizens.

If and when it leaves, there will supposedly be a period during which you can still stay without a visa, and basically will still be treated like any other EU citizen, giving you time to sort yourself out. But, as you may have noticed, there is no deal, which means that no such period has in fact been agreed upon.

You can sign up to a UK government newsletter to automatically receive info.

 

Main thing is Einwohnermeldeamt or Bürgerbüro, where you go to register your address (Wohnsitz anmelden). You're supposed to do that fast, within 2 weeks of living there. For that you need confirmation of your address from your landlord.

 

Oh, and yes, health insurance is mandatory and a big deal.

 

Like Brad says, get yourself a big indexed folder with all the certificates and letters you've ever received - O levels, Christmas card from landlord - so you can whip it out when they start shaking their heads.

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15 minutes ago, anne k said:

Like Brad says, get yourself a big indexed folder with all the certificates and letters you've ever received - O levels, Christmas card from landlord - so you can whip it out when they start shaking their heads.

Yes, they seriously asked me for my High School grades when I applied for a job. The diploma was not sufficient.  I graduated in the eighties. My High School doesn't exist anymore - at least not in the form it was in the eighties.  If I have a copy of my grades, which I doubt, then they are in a musty box somewhere in my father's basement in the US.  Luckily they relented.

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3 minutes ago, BradinBayern said:

Yes, they seriously asked me for my High School grades when I applied for a job. The diploma was not sufficient.  I graduated in the eighties. My High School doesn't exist anymore - at least not in the form it was in the eighties.  If I have a copy of my grades, which I doubt, then they are in a musty box somewhere in my father's basement in the US.  Luckily they relented.

I had the same problem. In the end I had to write to UCAS, the examination board. They mademe up a nice replacement certificate. With the wrong grades :) they didn't have the information any more, but there was someone there with a practical streak.

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Examination board?  We have no such thing.  Grades are kept (or not) by the individual schools.  Obviously, they cannot afford to keep paper records for students from over 30 years ago (geez, that long ago already?) nor to digitize them. After all who in their right mind would ask for grades from 30 years ago??  

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59 minutes ago, anne k said:

As long as the UK is still in the EU, you just have to do the stuff required of EU citizens.

 

He doesn't necessarily meet the requirements for EU citizens.

 

21 hours ago, Thefisherman said:

I have a daughter and a partner who live in Germany [Saxony]. After a long hiatus in our relationship and reconciling, we have decided it would be better for us to be a family fully (meaning I relocate from Scotland to Germany). My situation however is very special. I am registered disabled in the UK and unable to work (Mental and physical issues).


How old is your daughter? What citizenship does she have? Are the benefits you receive in the UK transferable to Germany?

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3 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

He doesn't necessarily meet the requirements for EU citizens.

 


How old is your daughter? What citizenship does she have? Are the benefits you receive in the UK transferable to Germany?

 

She is ten. Full German citizen and I have not applied for her to receive her Dual Nationality citizenship yet. I’ve a suspicion that some of my social security might be transferable to Germany but don’t quote me on that.

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1 minute ago, Thefisherman said:

 

She is ten. Full German citizen

 

As a parent of a minor German child you are also entitled to a permit under §28 AufenthG (the regular immigration law that has nothing to do with EU rules). 

 

1 minute ago, Thefisherman said:

and I have not applied for her to receive her Dual Nationality citizenship yet.

 

She either had dual citizenship or she doesn't, you don't need to apply for citizenship for her, but rather a passport. It is probably good to sort that out now too.

 

1 minute ago, Thefisherman said:

I’ve a suspicion that some of my social security might be transferable to Germany but don’t quote me on that.

 

You need to look into this. Ask the department in the UK that provides the benefits if you would still be eligible if you move to Germany.

 

The most important points in your list are #2, 3, and then 6. You usually need a Meldebestätigung in order to open a bank account. Due to your pre-existing conditions it is important that you sign up for public health insurance ASAP.

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Awesome advice. Thank you very much. Would anyone here advise the thought of me and my partner attending an immigration solicitor to make sure things go smoothly?

 

My partner has said she will contact her health insurance provider ASAP to possibly get me added onto her insurance.

 

Indeed, I am entitled to a permit to live in Germany, but could anyone have the first guess to what type of permit I would qualify for? I will be here for the long run and naturally I just want to ensure my daughter that I'm there and not going anywhere.

 

Thanks once again everyone.

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Thefisherman- you cannot get onto your partner’s health insurance because you are not married and maybe your pension is higher than family co-insurance would allow anyway.

You are entitled to apply for German public insurance anyway - with the price being based on either your pension  and any other income or based on the savings you live off.

 

Danny- I am willing to help you get into German public health insurance without any fees to you. 

I’m an insurance broker and am used to the hassle involved.

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7 minutes ago, Thefisherman said:

My partner has said she will contact her health insurance provider ASAP to possibly get me added onto her insurance.

It doesn't work that way unless you're married. Unless and until you decide to take that step, you'll have to pay for your own insurance. What engelchen was referring to was the urgent matter that you join a public health insurance fund - the public funds don't rule out coverage of preexisting conditions - within 90 days of arriving in Germany. If you miss that window, you'll be in a serious pickle.

 

8 minutes ago, Thefisherman said:

 could anyone have the first guess to what type of permit I would qualify for?

engelchen already quoted it: §28 AufenthG, which covers the parents of minor children. You'll find the law in English here.

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23 minutes ago, Thefisherman said:

 Would anyone here advise the thought of me and my partner attending an immigration solicitor to make sure things go smoothly?

 

Waste of money in your case.

 

Quote

My partner has said she will contact her health insurance provider ASAP to possibly get me added onto her insurance.

 

You need to get married first.

 

Quote

Indeed, I am entitled to a permit to live in Germany, but could anyone have the first guess to what type of permit I would qualify for? I will be here for the long run and naturally I just want to ensure my daughter that I'm there and not going anywhere.

 

As an EU citizen you actually don't need anything but to register (anmelden) and have comprehensive health insurance (in your case you really should sign up for public health insurance).

 

Post Brexit you need a permit, but as long as you are actively involved in your (minor) daughter's life, you can have your permit extended.

 

What will happen after your daughter reaches 18 will depend on your situation, the Brexit agreement, possibly your ability to support yourself, and many other factors. It is much too soon to worry about what the laws might be in 8 years.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, BradinBayern said:

[U.S.] Grades are kept (or not) by the individual schools.  Obviously, they cannot afford to keep paper records for students from over 30 years ago (geez, that long ago already?) nor to digitize them. After all who in their right mind would ask for grades from 30 years ago??  

 

I recently asked my U.S. high school for a transcript from the 1980s.  The school referred me to a vendor, Parchment, which for $7 emailed me a pdf in just a few hours.  For more money a certified copy could be mailed.  I was impressed. 

 

But, it wasn't quite correct.  We had a school year with 2 semesters, each with 2 "quarters".  We got grades for each quarter and for the semester.  So one might for example get a "C" for the second quarter, but get a "B" for the semester.  The transcript only had semester grades, and I am pretty sure some of them were wrong.  Also, the transcript had my phone number wrong. 

 

But as Brad notes, it was 30 years ago. At least they could confirm I graduated.

 

this is just what OP TheFisherman wanted to know, right?  :-)  

 

My tip to the OP, if he's headed to Dresden or Leipzig, act quickly to make an appointment at the Auslaenderbehoerde (unless EU citizens don't go there?).  My experience has been that after the migrant influx, it can take weeks or months to get an appointment in Dresden.  Of course, the appointment system is better than the take-a-number free-for-all that reigned in years gone by.  

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Yes, my comments were assuming that you are indeed an EU citizen.

If you are, you could also get your partner to have a look here (for instance) as apparently you are entitled to advice for people with disabilities.

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59 minutes ago, john g. said:

Thefisherman- you cannot get onto your partner’s health insurance because you are not married and maybe your pension is higher than family co-insurance would allow anyway.

You are entitled to apply for German public insurance anyway - with the price being based on either your pension  and any other income or based on the savings you live off.

 

Danny- I am willing to help you get into German public health insurance without any fees to you. 

I’m an insurance broker and am used to the hassle involved.

To OP:

John g is a well respected Insurance broker, and you would be well served if you contact him about Health Insurance.

As others have said, contact your UK social services about transferring benefits.   You really need to try and do this before Brexit, as  no-one knows what will happen. Good luck.

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