Chances of getting a job/permit for Germany remotely (from the US)

7 posts in this topic

Hi everyone ,

 

First of all, apologies if this is in the wrong section or not tagged appropriately.

 

I would appreciate it if anyone can give me some honest feedback or pointers regarding my goals and questions :

 

I currently work in the US in the financial services industry. I'm not a US citizen and am on a shitty work visa which expires in 2 years. Independent of that, I've been considering making the move to Germany for personal reasons for a while now (>5 years). So I figure with the visa expiring anyway, I may as well make the move. I am targeting a move date of February 2021.

 

My background : I work in fixed income technology for a big bank - ie pricing derivatives, risk analysis with an engineering/mathematics background (Master's degree). My skills include things like probability, statistics, option pricing theory & stochastic calculus. I also know a small amount of Python, SQL and Excel/VBA, which I aim to get more practical exposure to in the next 1-2 years. I have around 5 years of experience.

 

I speak decent German, fully self-taught. I estimate it to be around B2 but I will get it confirmed from a Goethe Institut here by maybe taking a test. I can put in some hard work over the next 6 months to a year and maybe even get a C1 certificate, if it makes any difference from B2 in terms of job prospects.

 

My questions :

1) What is the likelihood of me getting even interviews or call-backs when I apply remotely to quantitative finance/analyst jobs in Frankfurt from the US? Basically will recruiters in general show any interest at all in my profile, when I'm applying cold? 

2) What about the odds of me getting a job & blue card just from here, ie purely through Skype interviews? It might be hard for me to visit Germany at the drop of a hat because I need a visa to even visit (passport from a 3rd world dump)

3) If both 1 and 2 don't sound like likely propositions, my only option would be to get a job seeker visa and actually move there first. I would not prefer to do this, but I imagine my job prospects would go up drastically when I am actually in Germany?

4) Any other suggestions or tips, especially from people on this forum with a finance/fintech background, would help me a lot.

 

Thanks!

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21 hours ago, Tikrak said:

1) What is the likelihood of me getting even interviews or call-backs when I apply remotely to quantitative finance/analyst jobs in Frankfurt from the US? Basically will recruiters in general show any interest at all in my profile, when I'm applying cold? 

 

Low.  What relevant niche qualifications do you hold?  CFA?

 

21 hours ago, Tikrak said:

What about the odds of me getting a job & blue card just from here, ie purely through Skype interviews? It might be hard for me to visit Germany at the drop of a hat because I need a visa to even visit (passport from a 3rd world dump)

 

Low unless you have something to offer that is hard to find here.  Do you know about  SR11-07, R, SAS?

 

21 hours ago, Tikrak said:

3) If both 1 and 2 don't sound like likely propositions, my only option would be to get a job seeker visa and actually move there first. I would not prefer to do this, but I imagine my job prospects would go up drastically when I am actually in Germany?

 

Assuming you are eligable for a blue card, yes Id say your chances go from close to zero to ok.

 

21 hours ago, Tikrak said:

4) Any other suggestions or tips, especially from people on this forum with a finance/fintech background, would help me a lot.

 

I currently work in software, but come from a funds transfer and banking software background. Id say just about the only place in germany that makes sense is Frankfurt.  You need to be sure you will find a job before coming here.  I know no end of people from a variety of countries (US, India, France, Greece, Israel amongst others) that came here expecting to walk into work because they had 5-10 years experience and a bit of german and ended up leaving after 6 months having burnt through their savings.  Sure, I live in berlin, the city of dropouts and broken dreams but still I cant imagine its easy anywhere.

 

That said its not all bad, and its far from impossible, there are thousands of us on Toytown and many (most?) have work.  But we all need to go in with our eyes open.  

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12 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

Low.  What relevant niche qualifications do you hold?  CFA?

 

 

I don't have a CFA. Are you saying people with Master's degrees and relevant work experience/tech skills in finance are so ubiquitous in Germany that an extra certification like the CFA or FRM would be the deciding factor in them even getting calls from recruiters?

 

12 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

Low unless you have something to offer that is hard to find here.  Do you know about  SR11-07, R, SAS?

 

 

I do know about SR11-07. Replace R with Python.

 

12 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

Assuming you are eligable for a blue card, yes Id say your chances go from close to zero to ok.

 

 

Now I'm confused. Suppose I don't have "niche certifications" like the CFA and other hard to find skills, but just by being present in Germany my chances will go up in spite of that? Genuine question.

 

12 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

You need to be sure you will find a job before coming here.  I know no end of people from a variety of countries (US, India, France, Greece, Israel amongst others) that came here expecting to walk into work because they had 5-10 years experience and a bit of german and ended up leaving after 6 months having burnt through their savings.  Sure, I live in berlin, the city of dropouts and broken dreams but still I cant imagine its easy anywhere.

 

That said its not all bad, and its far from impossible, there are thousands of us on Toytown and many (most?) have work.  But we all need to go in with our eyes open.  

 

If I was sure that I could go to Germany and expect to walk into work, I wouldn't have made this post. What level of German did these people speak, if you don't mind me asking? I would've thought B2-C1 range would be classified as more than just "a bit of German".

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If the prospective employer cannot find a qualified German to do the job, you might have a chance.  But still, when my son came to Germany (under the proviso that he'd been born in Germany and was under 27), speaking German and with a number of years' experience in the job he was seeking at Hugendubel, they hired him and then had to rescind the offer because the Arbeitsamt said there were Germans who could do the job and they had precedence (Vorrang).

 

It was all for the best, though.  He applied elsewhere, got a good job, fell in love with a co-worker, married, bought a house, had two little girls.  Life is good for Vierling.

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4 hours ago, Tikrak said:

 

Now I'm confused. Suppose I don't have "niche certifications" like the CFA and other hard to find skills, but just by being present in Germany my chances will go up in spite of that? Genuine question.

 

Yes, your chances of getting employment will go up massively if you are in Germany. This is seen as a desirable destination for many potential migrants, and companies receive massive numbers of applications from candidates that are hoping to use employment as a way to migrate. From the company's point of view you are a much greater risk: it will be longer before you can start work, you might not fit into the culture, you might not be who you say you are, you might have problems with visas, etc. If there is someone local, or someone already here that can sit in the interview and show that they are already assimilating they will have a better chance than someone applying from overseas.

 

4 hours ago, Tikrak said:

 

What level of German did these people speak, if you don't mind me asking? I would've thought B2-C1 range would be classified as more than just "a bit of German".

Speaking good German will greatly increase your chances as you are able to work with companies that predominantly speak German, which in Germany happens to be most of them. Even those that might use English as the language of documentation will tend to use German for much of the day-to-day work. It is worth having your language skills certified, as being self-taught might mean that you have important gaps in your abilities. I don't want to discourage you, but being able to pass the C1 exam is not sufficient for professional work. It means that you have all the foundations that you need, but you really have to keep improving so that you can follow complex conversations and contribute. I think that if you can master the language many other common migrant problems disappear. 

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7 hours ago, Tikrak said:

Now I'm confused. Suppose I don't have "niche certifications" like the CFA and other hard to find skills, but just by being present in Germany my chances will go up in spite of that? Genuine question.

 

Being in Germany makes a huge difference. As does speaking German. But maybe not enough.

 

For all the ifrs and GAAP, Germany isn't the us and local experience and local qualifications are important.

 

 

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