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Waldkita Experience?

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We're applying to a bunch of Waldkitas for our child because it sounds like a great idea and I wish that I had had something like that, but I'd like to know if anyone here has had direct or indirect experience with Waldkitas / Waldkita children.  Are there any questions I should be asking the Kita leadership which I wouldn't necessarily ask a normal Kita, or am I making a huge mistake?  

Chime in!

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A couple of other parents at my son's primary school had their younger children at a nearby Waldkita.

I went along a few times with them to the Waldkita in the morning after the older ones had been taken to school. 

Obviously I didn't have personal experience, but I was seeing how the place was run, how staff/parents/children were interacting, and so on, and thought it looked great.

 

I also saw the same Kita children at the end of the day, as their parents picked up the Kita kids first, then went to the primay school to pick up the older siblings. By the end of the day those Kita kids were often an awful lot dirtier than kids in a more standard Kita would have been, so you would have to be mentally prepared to do a lot more washing of clothes/bodies/hair than would otherwise be the case. Really, that's the only negative thing I could say about it!

 

 

 

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Thanks for the sanity check.  As a parent I think we come up with enough shit to worry about, and siding with convention is often easier but not always important or well-grounded.  My other legit fear was whether they'd get lyme disease.  Probable, but we can spend a couple minutes checking for ticks as part of our daily routine. 

Went to the open house and it looked great.  We've got our fingers crossed.  

While my kid will choose to like or dislike the experience, I wish I could've had something similar, and I think it's too cool of an experience to pass up on.  Speaking to my father, it sounds more in line with what kids of his generation did.  Outside, he said, everything you touch can be yours.  Whilst inside, everything around belongs to somebody and is permissioned.  

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Again, no direct experience, but the headmaster of the British school we had here sent his son to one, and he and his wife were thrilled. There was a strong community and opportunities for involvement should one wish.

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I used to buy my kid (nice) second hand clothes and tell her to jump in puddles and roll around in the mud if she fancied it. You cannot do that when you are older so need to do it as a kid. Other mums used to get really distressed if their kids or their clothes got dirty. One mum used to carry her kid on her arm till she was about three so she wouldn't get dirty. It got to the point the neighbours were asking if the kid had a problem walking. I take the view that a kid should be allowed to be a bit mucky. We have washing machines. And I never got into a strop because a pair of trousers got stained or ripped. They'd only cost a couple of euros anyway.

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Quote

While my kid will choose to like or dislike the experience, I wish I could've had something similar, and I think it's too cool of an experience to pass up on.

 

You think it is cool, but what type of kid do you have? 

 

I still remember getting a chemistry set for my birthday one year despite the fact I hated chemistry because my controlling manipulative mother wanted me to be a doctor. I ended up in tears on by birthday and never touched the chemistry set (I also dropped all natural sciences in high school as soon as it was possible to do so). 

 

I think you should also consider whether your kid would like spending all day outdoors. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, engelchen said:

You think it is cool, but what type of kid do you have? 

 

Thank you for your input.  I fully understand that the decision is not to stroke my own ego.  I am sorry that you feel your mother wronged you.  

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I had an alternative background family. I turned to the Dark Side

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Unfortunately, there is no Waldkita near us so our son will have to go to normal Kindergarten. Friends are lucky enough to have one though and both their kids loved it. They got in very early, the year it opened, which was brilliant, because now there are long waiting lists. The kids have a wonderful immune system, learned a lot, but in a fun way and had really good motor skills when they started school.

Also, you're gonna spend long hours in school when it starts, anyway, so a Waldkita is a wonderful way to ensure they have more of a chance to play outside.

But it is like always: a Kindergarten usually has an educational concept. Waldkita even more so because you are so much more dependent on having a working system. If it works, great. If they try to be just like a normal Kita with the only difference being that the kids spend a bit more time outside, not so much. It is a lot more work for the staff, but tends to attract a different kind of staff, if done right. If you liked the open house - go for it, I would say.

Unless, as Engelchen pointed out, your kid hates spending time outside and doesn't like getting dirty. There are kids like that…

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