Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Retiring soon. What to do about health insurance?

23 posts in this topic

So I will soon be retiring. Hurray!! There are lots of questions to consider. One of the most important is this. What do I need to do to continue to get Heath Insurance? Do I just carry on with my current Provider or must I consider something else.?

Thanks

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats!! Why don't you give your current provider a call? That's what I would do.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have public or private insurance? Is it a "real" insurance policy that's compliant with the German requirements or are you using a travel policy to skirt the rules?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I understand it if you have  public health insurance after retirement it costs much less. For private the cost remains the same but you might get an addition (pittance) on your German state pension (assuming you contributed). I also believe in both cases the cost remains pretty much fixed for pensioners as does the t&cs i.e. they can't reduce/change the cover or charge more as/if you become a higher risk. On the other hand you can't change it either e.g. private room in hospital if you do't already have it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, keith2011 said:

As I understand it if you have  public health insurance after retirement it costs much less.

 

Only if the pensioner meets the necessary criteria, i.e. publicly insured for a minimum of 90% of the second half of his working life.

 

The cost varies depending on many factors and the OP hasn't given any details.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, keith2011 said:

For private the cost remains the same..

 

Not quite - he can cancel the part of the private insurance that is "Krankentagegeldversicherung" i.e. the insurance that pays out in case of illness once the employer ceases to pay (usually after 90 days).

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My understanding is that health insurance continues as before. You paying half and the pension people paying the other half. The question comes if you have other income, do you have pay health insurance on that amount. That's where the 90% public rule comes in.

 

apparently there's some weird quirk in the rules that if you get a lump sum payment you have to pay the full amount 18% or what ever it is. Seen loads of complaints over that one. 

 

Edit: if you're private it continues as before

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/05/2019, 16:37:25, colincostello said:

So I will soon be retiring. Hurray!! There are lots of questions to consider. One of the most important is this. What do I need to do to continue to get Heath Insurance? Do I just carry on with my current Provider or must I consider something else.?

Thanks

Wil you be receiving a UK state pension? if yes, then your health insurance will be covered by that, as long as the UK remains in the EU

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, john g. said:

Ah,a company pension (Direktversicherung ) paid for out of your gross income...if you´re publicly insured, you have to pay more health insurance the year of the payout..but not if you´re privately health insured. I think that´s what you mean.

 

https://www.finanztip.de/betriebliche-altersvorsorge/direktversicherung-auszahlung/

 

...and the following 9 years.

 

Public health insurance pretends that the lump sum is paid out over 120 months (= 10 years).

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Wulfrun said:

Wil you be receiving a UK state pension? if yes, then your health insurance will be covered by that, as long as the UK remains in the EU

Wrong! UK pensioners only get foreign health cover free from the NHS if they were resident and employed in the UK when they reached retirement age and were eligible for a UK pension and subsequently moved abroad in the EU  and some other countries with reciprocal arrangements. If you are/were working and resident abroad when you retire even if you receive a UK pension you must comply to the local laws regarding health insurance the NHS do not pay for insurance or treatment in this case.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, engelchen said:

 

Only if the pensioner meets the necessary criteria, i.e. publicly insured for a minimum of 90% of the second half of his working life.

 

The cost varies depending on many factors and the OP hasn't given any details.

 

riffing off this and for anyone who knows  (not picking on  you engelchen):  how is that calculated for expats?

 

eg I moved to Germany when I was 43 and of course that was my first opportunity in life to join a public kasse. I've been with TK ever since.  But how is my "working life" calculated?  when did it start?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, lisa13 said:

 But how is my "working life" calculated?  when did it start?

 

Your working life started with your first job (even if it was abroad). Time insured in a public health care system in the EEA counts as if it were in Germany.

 

There are also special rules for countries with which Germany has a Social Security Agreement, however, I don't know the rules for the US (you'd have to check the agreement).

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, engelchen said:

Your working life started with your first job (even if it was abroad).

 

my first job was baby sitting when I was 12 ;)

 

I think my first job that (allegedly, if the employer wasn't ripping me off) collected social security payments was when I was 16.  Working part time in a shop after school and on weekends.  

 

but my first profi job wasn't til I was 28.

 

who could I officially talk to about these specifics?  the kasse or the rentenversicherungs amt or some other entity entirely?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

 

my first job was baby sitting when I was 12 ;)

 

Cash? I doubt it counts and there is no paper trail. :ph34r:

 

Quote

I think my first job that (allegedly, if the employer wasn't ripping me off) collected social security payments was when I was 16.  Working part time in a shop after school and on weekends.  

 

but my first profi job wasn't til I was 28.

 

It sounds as if it'll be calculated from 16 for you. 

 

Quote

who could I officially talk to about these specifics?  the kasse or the rentenversicherungs amt or some other entity entirely?

 

Your Kasse is responsible for processing your application for the KVdR at retirement, however, don't count on the average call centre worker to be able to accurately answer your question. 

 

Send a written request for a binding response. 

 

Perhaps either @Starshollow or @PandaMunich are familiar with the German American SSA.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, what a disturbing thread. I feel like every few months I come across another piece of small print in the German social contract that makes me wonder why anyone migrates here. Something else to read up on!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Auswanderer said:

Wow, what a disturbing thread. I feel like every few months I come across another piece of small print in the German social contract that makes me wonder why anyone migrates here. Something else to read up on!

Personally I think the German social contract is a considerably better than that of the UK. Yes you do have to continue to pay health insurance after retirement but at least  I don't have to wait 2 weeks to see a doctor or suffer for hours in an ambulance outside A&E! German state and company/private pensions seem to be generous compared to the UK and better regulated, my final salary pension with HP-UK has never been increased (for anyone ever B&%t&$*#) pre- 1997 contributions are not legally subject to inflation proofing in the UK.

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0