Marriage in Germany - British citizens re-marrying

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 Really need some advice asap regarding marriage in Germany.  As British citizens we have provided the Standesamt with all documents required; officially translated,  with Apostil stamps and in case of my previous marriage in uk also with Notarised divorce certificate.  So far this process has taken 4 months and cost us almost £1000 and many visits backwards and forwards. We thought the final hurdle was applying to the courts for a certificate of 'no impediment to marriage' (no longer issued by British Embassy.  Now they have said they want original certificates for ALL previous marriages and divorces (translated,  notarised and apostilled). I can't begin to explain the problems and disappointment we've experienced with what should have been a joyous event. It's felt that the bar has been raised every time we've returned with everything we were told was required and also experienced a bit of discrimination and a lot of unhelpfulness because we're British. As far as I can see, a notarised and Apostilled divorce certificate from the British Government should be enough to show we are free to marry? Any help would be greatly appreciated. We cannot afford the time or money to continue down this path.

 

Note: The letter recieved quoted 'EU Article 39'

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Friends of mine simply married in her homecountry after having tried insuccesfully to get an accepted certificate. 

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Would it not be easier to just get married somewhere else?  Like the UK or Denmark and then just apply in Germany to get the marriage recognised?  It would still require jumping through hoops, but maybe not as many.

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I did remarry here in Germany but getting all the documents required and having them translated was a costly and frustrating experience, they would not even accept my original birth certificate and instead required a new copy from the town hall where I was born in England, unbelievable. My advice is take a holiday and and go back to the UK to get married.

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A new EU rule actually came into force recently that requires member states to provide Multilingual Standard Forms (MSF). "A MSF replaces a legalised, translation of a birth, death or marriage certificate in other EU countries." I just recently ordered a MSF in German with my British birth certificate for just 22 pounds. The MSF is intended to end this expensive translation and legalisation business among the EU member states. While the UK is still a member, I would stock up on those.

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2 hours ago, Deutschland Debs said:

 Really need some advice asap regarding marriage in Germany.  As British citizens we have provided the Standesamt with all documents required; officially translated,  with Apostil stamps and in case of my previous marriage in uk also with Notarised divorce certificate.  So far this process has taken 4 months and cost us almost £1000 and many visits backwards and forwards. We thought the final hurdle was applying to the courts for a certificate of 'no impediment to marriage' (no longer issued by British Embassy.  Now they have said they want original certificates for ALL previous marriages and divorces (translated,  notarised and apostilled). I can't begin to explain the problems and disappointment we've experienced with what should have been a joyous event. It's felt that the bar has been raised every time we've returned with everything we were told was required and also experienced a bit of discrimination and a lot of unhelpfulness because we're British. As far as I can see, a notarised and Apostilled divorce certificate from the British Government should be enough to show we are free to marry? Any help would be greatly appreciated. We cannot afford the time or money to continue down this path.

 

Note: The letter recieved quoted 'EU Article 39'

 

I don't know if it is possible for UK citizens, but some Norwegian friends of ours got married in the Norwegian Embassy in Berlin.  Perhaps a thought to contact the British embassy to see if it is possible?

Would save a lot of hassle if it was.

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3 hours ago, Chris Marston said:

A new EU rule actually came into force recently that requires member states to provide Multilingual Standard Forms (MSF). "A MSF replaces a legalised, translation of a birth, death or marriage certificate in other EU countries." I just recently ordered a MSF in German with my British birth certificate for just 22 pounds. The MSF is intended to end this expensive translation and legalisation business among the EU member states. While the UK is still a member, I would stock up on those.

Hi Chris, this is very interesting and I've never heard of these forms. I've had a quick look around the internet and from what I can see the unfortunate aspect of this is that Germany,  or any other member eu state, does not have to accept these forms. Which kind of makes you wonder what the point of joining the eu is if you just get to pick and choose which regulations you wish to follow. 

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I have just found this on the uk government website and wonder if anyone can help me make sense of it? 

 

From what I can understand,  I don't have to get a 'no impediment to marriage' certificate from Germany if my home country is able to issue me one under uk law (costs about £40 and is very easy to obtain). Under uk law I only have to submit my previous marriage divorce certificate, not every marriage and Divorce certificate.

Screenshot_20190428-191722.png

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5 hours ago, dj_jay_smith said:

Would it not be easier to just get married somewhere else?  Like the UK or Denmark and then just apply in Germany to get the marriage recognised?  It would still require jumping through hoops, but maybe not as many.

 

I definitely agree with this. I would do it in the UK and then get it recognised in Germany. Much easier in my opinion. To get it recognised here, I only had to get the marriage certificate apostilled by a Notar in the UK which I did immediately after I got the marriage certificate and paid a bit extra to collect the Apostilled certificate before heading back to Germany. It was very very easy. We had to be "resident" for 9 days in the UK at a UK address before hand which was also easy. That was in 2015 so I didn't have to deal with the MSF forms though. Good luck.

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My daughter is getting married in August. She was born here, but still has an Irish passport and her boyfriend was born in London.   When they started to organise the wedding last year here in Frankfurt, they reaslised just how complicated it is, consistently needing new paperwork which caused delays, so I suggested they look into getting married in London and we'll have a second reception here in Frankfurt when they get back.  It's all been organised now on the date they wanted and has been so much easier, I would certainly recommend it.

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If you want to combine a long weekend away, getting married and partying with friends then consider Gibraltar.

Go google it's the simplest and easiest option and can be done at very short notice.

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@Deutschland Debs, regardless of what the ridiculous posters on this thread say, getting married abroad will not solve your problem. 

 

Your marriage and your previous divorce will still have to be recognized in Germany and you will still have to submit the same documentation. 

 

There are no guarantees that the rentenversicherung will accept your foreign marriage as an example.

 

Unfortunately here there are no short cuts, what the Standesamt are asking for you should really just submit.

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Generally the Standesamt wants official translations (beglaubigte Übersetzungen) of all the main documents (probably birth, definitely previous marriages and divorces). Once you have the additional ones the Standesamt has requested, try and get a translation agency to do them as a package for you. The other key thing is obtaining the Form D130 "Concerning judgements in matrimonial matters" for each divorce. You can get this from the gov.uk website. As it's an EU form it might be best to do this before the Brexit is finalised. It should be free (there used to be a fee). Call the court that processed your divorce and check which email address you can send the completed form to. The court should send it back to your German address. As this is a standard form throughout the EU, you shouldn't need a translation even though it's in English. Just one thought, you could ask the Standesamt if you really need to provide the documentation for previous divorces if you can give them the D180 in each case (on top of the documents for your last marriage/divorce that you've already provided). They might say no but it's worth a try. 

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Can anyone explain why Germany require legalised documents for ALL previous marriages and divorces? In the UK, all you need is the last divorce certificate which clearly proves your are now free to marry.  What is the point of previous marriages before that? It makes no sense whatsoever. 

 

I think we're resigned to getting married in Scotland now but we are really upset that we've spent so much money for absolutely nothing in translations, notarisations and legalisation of documents. The Standesamt have much to answer for because they had every opportunity to explain fully the process and requirements. If they'd done their job properly we could have made an informed decision and used the money to return to Scotland. 

 

But thanks for everyones responses. At least nobody is ever out of employment with the amount of paperwork required here for everything (and that's coming from someone who worked for the NHS and Social Services!).

 

 

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Deutschland Debs said:

Can anyone explain why Germany require legalised documents for ALL previous marriages and divorces? In the UK, all you need is the last divorce certificate which clearly proves your are now free to marry.  What is the point of previous marriages before that? It makes no sense whatsoever. 

 

I think we're resigned to getting married in Scotland now but we are really upset that we've spent so much money for absolutely nothing in translations, notarisations and legalisation of documents. The Standesamt have much to answer for because they had every opportunity to explain fully the process and requirements. If they'd done their job properly we could have made an informed decision and used the money to return to Scotland. 

 

But thanks for everyones responses. At least nobody is ever out of employment with the amount of paperwork required here for everything (and that's coming from someone who worked for the NHS and Social Services!).

 

 

 

 

 

I am not so sure why you are blaming the Standesamt here. I had to go through a 6-8 month process of getting my divorce recognized in Germany. The Standesamt made it very clear that even if I do get married abroad, i will still need to get my divorce recognized in Germany. There are no guarantees that the Finanazamt or any other German institution accept your foreign marriage without it first being recognised by the Standesamt and for it to be accepted by the Standesamt you will still have to submit all the documentation they are asking for.

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