Anmeldung at friend's (owner) place - is it legal?

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Hello folks,

I want to register at my friend's place who owns the house and stay with her for several months. She is the owner of the house, and she will give me her written approval to register there. I'll be staying there for several months, however, I won't have a contract and I'll be there for free. Is this legal? Is it okay to register at her place without having an actual contract? 

Thanks!

 

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Yes of course.  

For the registration they don't need to know about what financial agreement you may or may not have in place, that is a private matter, but they want some proof that you are living where you say you are so it might be helpful if your friend comes with you to the Burgeramt, otherwise they could write and sign a letter.

 

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43 minutes ago, AnitaRoxas said:

Is this legal? Is it okay to register at her place without having an actual contract? 

 

If you really live there, it's legal. But your friend has to fill out the official form, the so-called 'Wohnungsgeberbescheinigung'.  

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47 minutes ago, AnitaRoxas said:

 She is the owner of the house, and she will give me her written approval to register there.
 

Just have her fill out a Wohnungsgeberbestätigung, you don't need any written approval beyond that. The Wohnungsgeberbestätigung only confirms that she acknowledges as the owner that person x (you) has moved into a housing unit she owns.

 

Sample form for Cologne city here: https://formular-server.de/Koeln_FS/findform?shortname=02-F17_WohnGeberBest&formtecid=3&areashortname=koeln_html

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2 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

If you really live there, it's legal. But your friend has to fill out the official form, the so-called 'Wohnungsgeberbescheinigung'.  


Good thing you brought this up. You say if I really live there, it's legal. But what happens in this scenario: I register at my friend's place, and go back to my home country for two/three months vacation, then come back to actually live at my friend's place. Is this still legal? 

Thanks for your answers, guys. 

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1 minute ago, AnitaRoxas said:


Good thing you brought this up. You say if I really live there, it's legal. But what happens in this scenario: I register at my friend's place, and go back to my home country for two/three months vacation, then come back to actually live at my friend's place. Is this still legal? 

 

I think it's a bit strange when someone immediately comes up with scenarios in which he or she doesn't live there after all, sorry ... but so be it: 

 

Of course you have to fulfil your obligations - health insurance is compulsory, (pension insurance only for certain occupational groups, at least still), if you register a residence here you also become taxable and the radio fee is also due. The free movement of workers that you enjoy as an EU citizen, however, is linked to the activity as an employee, to self-employment or at least to the active search for work. 

 

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19 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

I think it's a bit strange when someone immediately comes up with scenarios in which he or she doesn't live there after all, sorry ... but so be it: 

 

Of course you have to fulfil your obligations - health insurance is compulsory, (pension insurance only for certain occupational groups, at least still), if you register a residence here you also become taxable and the radio fee is also due. The free movement of workers that you enjoy as an EU citizen, however, is linked to the activity as an employee, to self-employment or at least to the active search for work. 

 


Let me explain why I am asking. I'm a non-EU student currently registered in Germany who is finishing studies and will apply soon for a job seeker visa. I pay my health insurance, I pay the radio fee, I respect all my obligations - and will continue to pay all these things. My current contract ends in June, and I want to register at my friend's place from June as I have to be registered in Germany because of my visa. But I still don't have a job, and if I want to go to my country from June until August for vacation, for example - while being registered at my friend's place in Germany and respecting all my obligations - am I breaking some law? 

I'm just trying to understand what it means "if I actually live there." How much do I have to be out of the country for it to mean that I'm not living there?

And thanks for your reply.  
 

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14 minutes ago, AnitaRoxas said:


Let me explain why I am asking. I'm a non-EU student  (...) How much do I have to be out of the country for it to mean that I'm not living there?

 

That depends on your residence permit - your profile says "Slovenian", Slovenia is an EU state since 2004, now you say that you are a student from outside the EU ... 

 

Quote

 My current contract ends in June

 

What contract?? How long is your residence permit valid? 

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14 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

That depends on your residence permit - your profile says "Slovenian", Slovenia is an EU state since 2004, now you say that you are a student from outside the EU ... 

 

 

What contract?? How long is your residence permit valid? 


My current rental contract for a flat where I'm registered at the moment. And my current residence permit is student permit that also expires in June. I have an appointment in two weeks, where I'm supposed to change it to job seeker visa. 

I'm from Serbia, using my Slovenian girlfriend's account. :D

I'm trying to do things correctly here, without accidentally doing something that's not right. Do you have any advice where should I go to ask if what I mentioned is okay? That is - register at a friend's place, but then go out of Germany for two-three months, and then come back and live there. Bürgeramt?

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5 hours ago, AnitaRoxas said:

I'm from Serbia, using my Slovenian girlfriend's account. :D

 

I don't think it's funny. It is always quite unpleasant when you try to help someone and then fall for information that has nothing to do with the person seeking help. 

 

5 hours ago, AnitaRoxas said:

I'm trying to do things correctly here, without accidentally doing something that's not right. Do you have any advice where should I go to ask if what I mentioned is okay? That is - register at a friend's place, but then go out of Germany for two-three months, and then come back and live there. Bürgeramt?

 

You don't have to ask anywhere, it's okay. You can apply for a residence permit to find a job if you have proof from the university that you have successfully completed your studies. This means either the examination certificate or a corresponding confirmation from the examination office or the examination office of the department or faculty.

 

In addition, you must prove that you have health insurance (you will no longer be a student and can therefore no longer be insured as a student!) and you must prove that you can earn a living. 

 

A residence permit for the job search becomes invalid if you leave Germany for longer than six months. 

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7 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

In addition, you must prove that you have health insurance (you will no longer be a student and can therefore no longer be insured as a student!) and you must prove that you can earn a living. 

 


Now that you mention this, another question comes to mind. I'll have my preliminary final examination certificate these days (graduation date is in April), with which I can apply for job seeker visa. However, when I asked at my university examination office if the date of graduation means I'm automatically exmatriculated from uni, they said no. Exmatriculation date takes place at the last day of semester in which you graduated, which is 31st April. Then I called my insurance and said I want to switch to regular non-student insurance since I'm graduating, and they said that regular non-student insurance can take place only after exmatriculation, which is 31st August.

So basically, I should now apply for job seeker visa with my ongoing student insurance, and then from 31st August when I'm officially exmatriculated, I'd switch to regular one. Does this sound okay? I'm planning to go to the immigration office to check if I can apply for job seeker visa with my student insurance... 

Thanks again. :)

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17 hours ago, someonesdaughter said:

I think it's a bit strange when someone immediately comes up with scenarios in which he or she doesn't live there after all, sorry ... but so be it: 

 

Not really, people ask all the time about keeping german bank accounts etc and whether or not they can stay registered while travelling so they dont lose permanent residency etc.

 

I have had one person ask if they could (in my view fraudulently, but Im not a lawyer) register at my place while living in india. 

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8 minutes ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

Not really, people ask all the time about keeping german bank accounts etc and whether or not they can stay registered while travelling so they dont lose permanent residency etc.

 

I have had one person ask if they could (in my view fraudulently, but Im not a lawyer) register at my place while living in india. 

 

True. Having a job seeker visa basically forces you to live in Germany because you have to be registered, and this means actually living there. But what if someone wants to keep sending job applications from home? It can take months to find a job in relevant field in Germany. And jobseeker visa conditions (specifically, anmeldung) force you to live in Germany (or pay a rent just to have anmeldung)... when you could be sending job applications from home country and save a lot of money.

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5 hours ago, AnitaRoxas said:

And jobseeker visa conditions (specifically, anmeldung) force you to live in Germany (or pay a rent just to have anmeldung)... when you could be sending job applications from home country and save a lot of money.

 

Then you wouldn't need that jobseeker visa either though.

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2 hours ago, kato said:

 

 

Then you wouldn't need that jobseeker visa either though.

If you get a job from abroad without a visa, and then you apply for visa via embassy, in practice it can take one year to get that visa in my country. Took 18 months for a friend. So yeah, for practical reasons, job seeker visa removes this problem.

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On 4/26/2019, 5:42:07, AnitaRoxas said:


Good thing you brought this up. You say if I really live there, it's legal. But what happens in this scenario: I register at my friend's place, and go back to my home country for two/three months vacation, then come back to actually live at my friend's place. Is this still legal? 

Thanks for your answers, guys. 

 

The place where you live doesn't change when you go on vacation, don't worry.

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If, e.g. you broke your leg during the vacation, your friend will let you back in the place or if the authorities would want to send you letters – they will reach you at that address, right? Then it's fine that you register even though you are not physically present. Disclaimer, of course, I am not a lawyer.

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> It can take months to find a job in relevant field in Germany.

 

It is not likely to help you if you are not available readily for interviews and presumably also won't have regular German practice. So if you want to find a job ASAP it could be useful to actually stay in Germany.

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I just wanted to give a little update regarding the possibility to leave the country for several months and deregister address when out of the country, while retaining the validity of your residence permit. (In my case, my permit is the one that allows graduates to search for a job after successfully completing studies in Germany.) 

After a trip to Ausländerbehörde and talking to them personally, these are the answers I have received from an official who issued my visa:

1. My residence permit will remain valid even if I deregister and go home for several months. I'm allowed to leave the country for maximum of six months. I'm allowed to deregister before I leave. The moment I come back to Germany, I must register again. 

2. Regarding the health insurance, the official explained that I don't need German health insurance while out of the country, but she told me to check with health insurance, i.e. what are their conditions for letting me take it up again once I reenter Germany and e.g. start working. 

It's really good hearing from an official (and actually makes sense) that I don't need to remain registered while out of the country in order to retain my residence permit. There's a lot of information on the internet stating otherwise.  

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12 minutes ago, AnitaRoxas said:

It's really good hearing from an official (and actually makes sense) that I don't need to remain registered while out of the country in order to retain my residence permit.

It depends on what kind of visa you have. The 18-month job-seeker status after graduating from a German university gives you some leeway. Some other kinds of visas don't.

 

Hope you enjoy your vacation and good luck with the job search.

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