School Employs Nappy Changer

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Walsall Infant School Employs Nappy Changer

 

"An infant school has employed someone to change nappies because so many pupils are not toilet-trained, a councillor has said.

Chris Towe, Walsall Council's portfolio holder for education, said: "We are talking about five-year-olds here and it is not acceptable."

He said it was among many examples of children in the West Midlands borough starting school without basic skills.

Schools told him many pupils could not communicate or hold a pencil properly.

 

Head teachers had also raised concerns that school starters could not use cutlery or dress themselves.

Mr Towe told the BBC he had spoken to the heads of 80 infant and primary schools and found the lack of basic skills to be a "massive issue".

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-birmingham-47867342

 

 

 

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How to use a knife and fork or hold a pen should be taught at home by the family. I wonder what sort of food is put on the table at such homes. Do they eat as a family sat around the table and talk about their day?

 

I've just thought, perhaps they don't have a table.  

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14 minutes ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

How to use a knife and fork or hold a pen should be taught at home by the family. I wonder what sort of food is put on the table at such homes. Do they eat as a family sat around the table and talk about their day?

 

I've just thought, perhaps they don't have a table.  

 

 

Ahhhhh. That’s a sensitive topic that in my opinion would violently stir the free range parents’ emotions. It is an issue that is better left alone and not be elaborately discussed about, otherwise, it might be considered borderline judgemental, parent shaming and dictatorial. 🤔

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31 minutes ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

Head teachers had also raised concerns that school starters could not use cutlery...

 

Same as many German adults then.

 

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Delayed toilet-training isn't a new situation.  Here's a direct quote from 1964, from a boy pushing five years, to his mother (note he called his parents by their first names):  "Sarah, I need you to come and change my diaper right now."

Most children are ready to be toilet-trained once they've turned two, and it gives them a sense of pride and independence to leave diapers behind.

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Interesting part to me is that they employ a nappy changer not a toilet trainer. So there are kids that seem to come from homes where for whatever reason the kids have not acquired this or that routine (anyone asking why that is? ouh nah dont wanna know. Think! Its not necessary desinterest. Maybe there is a troubling divorce behind. Maybe its money issues having to work uncomfortable shifts that make it impossible for parents to raise the kids the way they would prefer. Maybe someone is seriously sick at home... ). And instead of trying to help and train the kids on the skill they lack teachers complain and accommodate. Whats coming next? Ah I see your parents dont use cutlery so we won't teach you either and feed you burgers and fries and therefore make sure you will have to stick to your background. I see there is noone able to help you with school issues. Too bad so we won't help you either and make sure you drop out early so you can join the people on the dole. Parents who can't cope need help not reprimand or a letter telling them what is requested. And its not the kids fault so stop complaining and instead set up programs to support kids at school in skills they seem to lack so they have a chance to get over this (and no I dont mean kids have to be taken out of their families or someone from child welfare sent to their homes just for a lacking skill here or there). If you leave it as it is the next generation will not be different at all.

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And another thing,  modern nappies are super absorbant and the child does not feel so uncomfortable in a wet nappy.   Not to mention they are easy for parents.  The work involved in washing towelling nappies is a huge incentive to getting your child toilet trained.  Mind you, 2 is not always doable. 

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2 hours ago, Wherearewegoingto said:

Interesting part to me is that they employ a nappy changer not a toilet trainer. 

 

Word. 👍 In our household, taking in consideration their readiness), we train our children usually based on the milestone that many children reach at certain ages (using spoon, toilet training, etc.). We also seek other parents’ or expert advice. But not everyone know or has this option. Although I personally believe we are responsible as parents to train/help/assist (or whichever word is politically correct) our children- to prepare them for what’s to come, there are many instances that make parents unable to do simple training. So yes, why not just hire someone to toilet train instead of a nappy changer? imo

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I remember Himself telling me many years ago that children can't go to kindergarten here if they aren't potty trained and/or cannot tie their own shoes. Made sense then and make sense now unless, of course, a particular child had some type of deficit that made these things impossible. The teachers just don't have time to tie 40 shoes each time they go outside. Does anyone know if this is still a requirement?

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@fraufruit maybe times have changed in the meantime, and it's not unheard of for infants ( >1 year) to be put up in daycare.  So they need diaper changes and cannot feed themselves.  Another thing is that of course, no one Erzhieherin need tie 40 pairs of shoes--two grownups will take out a group of 10-12 kids, and so getting them ready should take considerably less time.  When I worked as an early English teacher and visited a dozen kitas/kigas a week the majority of the kids were so small that they definitely needed help getting dressed before going out--jackets needed zipping up, shoes laced/buckled/velcroed on, mittens, caps, the whole shebang, and of course kids that needed help going to the toilet.  So no, at least in Berlin, that's not a requirement.

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But it is a requirement to go to primary school.   I remember receiving a list of things the kids were supposed to do by themselves from day 1 and it included to tie their shoes, wear jackets, go to toilet and a few other ones.

 

P.S., To tie shoes is not really an issue with small kids because nowadays most of their shoes come with Velcro.  Actually upgrading to shoes with laces when they are 5-7 is a big thing.  And by around 8 they do not want to wear Velcro shoes anymore because that's for babies.

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2 hours ago, fraufruit said:

I remember Himself telling me many years ago that children can't go to kindergarten here if they aren't potty trained and/or cannot tie their own shoes. Made sense then and make sense now unless, of course, a particular child had some type of deficit that made these things impossible. The teachers just don't have time to tie 40 shoes each time they go outside. Does anyone know if this is still a requirement?

 

When our daughter moved up from Kita -> Kindergarten about 18 months ago she had to be potty trained before she would be accepted.

Although we had some issues with it as she was not willing! (I wonder where she gets that stubbornness from?)  But luckily the Kita had a plan and we worked together, went through 2 -3 weeks of "hell on earth" but after that it was fine.  Of course there was still many accidents, but that is normal and expected and reduces over time.

 

As @Krieg pointed out, tying of shoes is not a problem anymore.  But to be honest this is not something an average 3 year old could do.  And babycenter.com suggests this is for the average 5 year old   https://www.babycenter.com/0_developmental-milestone-self-care-age-5_66682.bc

 

 

 

 

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I was referring to 5 yr. olds entering kindergarten, of course. 

 

There was no velcro in Himself's day or when his son was young.

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6 hours ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 ...But luckily the Kita had a plan and we worked together, went through 2 -3 weeks of "hell on earth" but after that it was fine.  Of course there was still many accidents, but that is normal and expected and reduces over Time...

 

 

 

Right you are. Luckily Kita had a plan...

If you are a soccer mom (Hockey mom/stay at home mom/whatever) you might have more time for such trainings at home. But if both parents are working full time - and living in major cities nowadays can indeed put families in a spot where they just need extra income - then kids/children are given into daycare. So a teacher can no longer use an excuse that it is not their task. Please do not offer daycare for working moms if it does not include basic training. If its not trained between 8 am and 4 pm what the heck can I save between 4 pm and 6/7 pm bedtime at young age. And weekends should not be bootcamps for things not learned during the week. A good teacher can always be a partner to unsuspecting or not knowing parents on what skills are lacking and recommend things to be trained at home but it needs support at creche/kindergarden/school no matter what age.

My understanding is that currently in Germany its consensus to offer more daycare so parents can work. That places a lot of responsibility on institutions and teachers to help kids develop skills which in the 1960s where trained at home. We can stick with the idea of not doing this and instead go ahead blaming parents but we will end up with a huge bunch of kids lacking basic skills and manners and education (not all of them coming from depressing backgrounds). And imo thats the main reason for uneducated  and not well mannered youths. So in any country where working parents are normal a part of the raising/training has to be done by teachers unless you want society go down the gutter.   

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9 hours ago, fraufruit said:

I remember Himself telling me many years ago that children can't go to kindergarten here if they aren't potty trained and/or cannot tie their own shoes. Made sense then and make sense now unless, of course, a particular child had some type of deficit that made these things impossible. The teachers just don't have time to tie 40 shoes each time they go outside. Does anyone know if this is still a requirement?

 

Tying shoes was a requirement for me from my mom when I was school age anyway.  I have no idea if it came from the school.  Mom kept a shoe under my bed and I had to practice every night before going to sleep.  I made it just fine.  However, mom's friend had a kid who wouldn't learn to tie his shoes.  She'd say Karl, how will you manage?  He said he'd be fine.  First day of school, he brought home a friend.  Said mom, this is Dori, he knows how to tie shoes.  

 

As for the diaper kids, I am sure they will eventually toilet train themselves once they are old enough.  That or they will be old enough to change their own nappies.

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2 hours ago, LeonG said:

As for the diaper kids, I am sure they will eventually toilet train themselves once they are old enough.  That or they will be old enough to change their own nappies.

 

I have read about parents who have 7 year old kids who are not potty trained. Nothing, I just want to mention it. 🧐

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15 hours ago, Wherearewegoingto said:

Interesting part to me is that they employ a nappy changer not a toilet trainer.

 

And instead of trying to help and train the kids on the skill they lack teachers complain and accommodate. Whats coming next?

 

If you leave it as it is the next generation will not be different at all.

 

 

Where do you think the money comes from to EMPLOY a nappy changer? Schools are awarded money from the state and where does the state get the money from to pay for this, the TAXPAYER.

 

Unfortunately, the article does not mention if the nappy changer is in the classroom all the time or if they have to call for her to come from a nearby room. Is the child then taken out of the classroom to have the nappy changed or is it done in the classroom? If you take a class of 20-25 children could be more and two children have to have their nappies changed in a 45 minute lesson, how much teaching time has been lost for the other children?

 

Drivers drive, painters paint, managers manage and teachers are supposed to teach not change nappies.

 

Lack of table manners can be a real job-killer in later life. I have heard several cases of young aspiring managers entertaining important clients. As nobody had told them how to use a knife and fork and that you do not begin to eat or drink until all your guests have been served, they did things they should not have done. Do you think they got the contract?

 

I have never understood why people who cannot sort their own life out, bring children into this world knowing full well that the child will have a difficult life. I am not talking about money and wealth, I am talking about a solid intact stable family for a child to grow up in. I know several people who came from poor families who talk about what a happy childhood they had even though their parents could not afford to buy them things other families had and that they had to wear clothes from older brothers and sisters.

 

 

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6 hours ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

Where do you think the money comes from to EMPLOY a nappy changer? Schools are awarded money from the state and where does the state get the money from to pay for this, the TAXPAYER.

 

Maybe she meant that if the state can hire a nappy changer, then why not just hire a potty trainer? But you are right. This gets taken out of taxpayers’ money. Unnecessary expenses. Which also leads to your spot on statement,

 

6 hours ago, White Rose of Yorkshire said:

I have never understood why people who cannot sort their own life out, bring children into this world knowing full well that the child will have a difficult life. I am not talking about money and wealth, I am talking about a solid intact stable family for a child to grow up in. 

 

True this. And what many people also do not understand is that having children is a privilege, not a right. 

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The article did not specify...but are the children concerned to be of a Special Education background? If this is the case, then I can understand the need to hire a nappy changer. Most kids under the SpEd spectrum will eventually be independent toilet users but developmentally need more time. 

 

While I was still working in a kita here, I toilet trained a five year old little boy. It was a sad situation really because the Mom was too scared to just get started and the German staff didn't want to try and train because the boy was special needs. This boggled my mind and so I took the responsibility and went with it. Training the little fella took maybe three weeks.

 

Makes you wonder where the skills and motivation are really missing in these situations.

 

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I recommend watching the film "idiocracy". If they dont get sorted their life how would they get sorted birth control. And not investing in education does not safe money since if kids dont get as much external training as needed  they might not exactly be next generation of tax PAYER

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