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Aufenhaltskarte: proof of funds requirement

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Hi everyone. A snapshot of my situation:

 

- My daughter and I are Australian's living in the UK, spouse is a EU citizen

- Moving to Berlin in June to look for work 

- Intending to stay permanently 

 

Questions:
- What is the financial requirement for the Aufenhaltskarte where the EU spouse has no work contract? I know for students it's 800-ish euro per month but have not been able to find any solid information for non-working spouse/dependent. We will have approx 20K euro in savings. 

- Do financial statements have to be translated into german or is english sufficient?

 

Any help much appreciated!

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3 minutes ago, flickabelle said:

- My daughter and I are Australian's living in the UK, spouse is a EU citizen

- Moving to Berlin in June to look for work 

- Intending to stay permanently

 

Why did you choose Berlin? Do you have any skills that are needed here?

 

The ABH has up to 6 months to issue the Aufenthaltskarte and usually they won't do anything within the first 3 months. After 3 months, your spouse needs to demonstrate that he is falls into one of the Freedom of Movement categories.

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9 minutes ago, flickabelle said:

Hi everyone. A snapshot of my situation:

 

- My daughter and I are Australian's living in the UK, spouse is a EU citizen

- Moving to Berlin in June to look for work 

- Intending to stay permanently 

 

Who's moving to Berlin? All three of you? And why Berlin, of all places, to look for work?How well do you speak German, how old is your daughter - is she subject to compulsory schooling? 

 

The residence card itself is not a residence title - the residence card only certifies the right derived from an EU citizen for non-EU citizens to reside in the EU. 

 

 

The right to freedom of movement for EU citizens is no longer valid for Britons after the Brexit, and thus also the rights derived from it for non-EU partners. So far there are no financial requirements. 

 

But since none of you have ever worked in Germany, you are not entitled to any social benefits, so you have to live on your savings. 

 

Have you really thought this through? Not only because of Brexit, you know that it's not so easy to get a (cheap) apartment in Berlin? And especially not if nobody has a job and there are three of you?

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40 minutes ago, flickabelle said:

- My daughter and I are Australian's living in the UK, spouse is a EU citizen

 

 

Quote

The right to freedom of movement for EU citizens is no longer valid for Britons after the Brexit, and thus also the rights derived from it for non-EU partners.

 

The OP said that her spouse is an EU citizen and they are living in the UK. There is no mention of anyone being British.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

The OP said that her spouse is an EU citizen and they are living in the UK. There is no mention of anyone being British.

 

 

You're right about that, of course. So it may contain that, the rest of my comments remain independent of the nationality of the EU citizen.

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Thank you everyone for your responses. I wasn't quite anticipating that responses to my enquiries rested on so many caveats! I was deliberately keeping my post brief so as not to complicate matters/take up anyone's time too greatly. But seeing as the questions have been posed:

 

- Husband is British/Australian dual national. He speaks fluent German. He holds two university degrees. He is a highly qualified (ie 100K+ average salary) software and mechatronics engineer.
- I am an Australian citizen. I am a Human Rights lawyer, not working at the moment. I hold 3 university degrees. I do not speak German at this stage.
- My daughter is 3 years old. She is an Australian citizen. I do not intend to enrol her in school until 6 but intend to send her to kindergarden. I am very aware of the crippling waiting lists in Berlin for any form of childcare or schooling. 

Berlin gives us a base to live, explore, enjoy the summer, network, start the assimilation process, and get cracking on career opportunities. We have visited Berlin many times and enjoy the environment.  Germany is an ideal environment for both our career areas. We have friends living and working there but all are EU citizens of diverse origins and have not gone through the process of non-eu spouse aufenhaltskarte requirements, hence my questions.

Yes, we may end up elsewhere in Germany depending on where industry opportunities take us, and we are open to that. We are also very aware that living is not cheap. It is, however, a hell of a lot cheaper and attractive (to our tastes) than where we come from in Melbourne, Sydney and Edinburgh, though. Money certainly isn't growing on trees for us, but overall we're fairly stable. 

My husband will be moving to Berlin 1 June. My daughter and I are camping around Spain and France for 2-3 months and will join him afterwards.

As for Brexit... that is why we are moving.  The UK does not offer us the kind of long term social, political or cultural environment we wish to bring our daughter up in, or for us to work/live in. I will not go into why we havent done so earlier, have a go at my husband for that one. 

Thanks again for the input so far everyone.

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14 hours ago, flickabelle said:

- Husband is British/Australian dual national. He speaks fluent German. He holds two university degrees. He is a highly qualified (ie 100K+ average salary) software and mechatronics engineer.

 

First of all, until the Brexit dust settles there is no way to know whether or not your husband will still be entitled to Freedom of Movement. Whether or not his qualifications will make him employable here is also not a given.

 

I would recommend reading this thread for more background info (despite being started 4 years ago, it is still relevant) and then doing more research:

 

 

14 hours ago, flickabelle said:

- I am an Australian citizen. I am a Human Rights lawyer, not working at the moment. I hold 3 university degrees. I do not speak German at this stage.

 

14 hours ago, flickabelle said:

Germany is an ideal environment for both our career areas.

 

Why do you think that Germany would be "an ideal environment" for your career? I honestly don't think that there are many professional opportunities for foreign human rights lawyers who can't even speak German.

 

As a lawyer, you should be perfectly capable of reading the EU treaties. The only thing you need to keep in mind is that you are required to have German health insurance (an EHIC will not suffice once you are resident here) and your husband will need to demonstrate that he fulfills a Freedom of Movement category when you and your daughter are issued Aufenthaltskarte

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There are non-profits and NGOs in Berlin. If you're really highly qualified, you could get work there. Academia is another option?

 

BTW, is your daughter not a British citizen, or is she just not exercising that right? Is she not your husband's daughter too?

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On 4/8/2019, 2:17:12, engelchen said:

 

Why did you choose Berlin? Do you have any skills that are needed here?

 

The ABH has up to 6 months to issue the Aufenthaltskarte and usually they won't do anything within the first 3 months. After 3 months, your spouse needs to demonstrate that he is falls into one of the Freedom of Movement categories.

 

Hi, I don't really understand. But are you saying the ABH at Berlin is slow at processing the cases?  
Just curious, is there the same problem with other bigger cities with a large number of immigrants?

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