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Foraging for wild garlic

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It´s that time of year again!
Where about in and around Berlin could i find wild garlic growing?
Cheers in advance!

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Around Berlin wild garlic is predominantly 'Berliner Bärlauch' (allium paradoxum), related to wild garlic, but with narrower leaves.  You can find some places where it grows on www.mundraub.org 

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Our kids already made a school excursion to Grunewald to collect it and made tons of pesto with it, which we have been slowly eating it for the past days.

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Thanks for the reminder!!! We have it in France too...

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Please be aware that Wild Garlic/Ramson (Allium paradoxum/ Allium ursinum)  is very similar in looks to Maiglöckchen/Lily of the Valley  (Convallaria majalis)  which are highly poisonous and also grow at this time of year.

 

The main distinguishing feature between wild garlic and Lily of the Valley is the obvious smell of garlic that emanates when you rub a leaf between your fingers. If the leaves do not give off this intense garlic-like odor it's not Wild garlic. 

Beware, If you have already rubbed some leaves of wild garlic, your fingers  may still smell very strong and so this is option is not always reliable.

 

It's not until both plants flower that you can straight away tell the difference but before they flower, you can distinguish them from their leaves or roots.

 

There are no roots from Wild Garlic as they grow from an onion type bulb much like Garlic itself and the Lily of the Valley produces rhizome-like, horizontal roots.

 

The Wild Garlic leaves are single leaves growing direct from the base of the plant and Lily of the Valley has 2 large  leaves from  a single stem, as in the picture below. The top leaf is Wild Garlic.

 

5ca475701aaed_lilyandramson.jpg.478ca11d

 

 

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Also, if you're going to be foraying deep into the woods, watch out for the wild boars.

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46 minutes ago, Sir Percy B said:

Please be aware that Wild Garlic/Ramson (Allium paradoxum/ Allium ursinum)  is very similar in looks to Maiglöckchen/Lily of the Valley  (Convallaria majalis)  which are highly poisonous and also grow at this time of year.

 

As a matter of fact. both grow in my garden. I transplanted a stand of Bärlauch from the family weekend place in the Alps to my own garden, where it grows like weeds. 

 

One other thing to be careful of: some areas have tapeworm transmitted by foxes (Fuchsbandwurm) so be extra careful down here in Bayern. 

 

My fave recipe is to harvest the leaves (full of healthy allicin) then gently fry them in olive oil, then parmesan and a bit of cream and some pine nuts for a tasty pesto. Secret tip is to fry them on a low heat for a longish time like 20 minutes to sweeten them.

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Wild garlic leaves are thinner and softer to the touch than Lily of the Valley.

 

Got a basket full yesterday.:)

Jeremy you are very lucky if you  got them to grow in your garden. It is too dry and exposed where we live. Will try to fry, thanks for the tip!

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36 minutes ago, El Jeffo said:

Also, if you're going to be foraying deep into the woods, watch out for the wild boars.

 

Saw a family of about 20 a few months ago after sundown. Granny, Grandad, Aunts, Cousins, awesome sight.

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23 minutes ago, optimista said:

Wild garlic leaves are thinner and softer to the touch than Lily of the Valley.

 

Got a basket full yesterday.:)

Jeremy you are very lucky if you  got them to grow in your garden. It is too dry and exposed where we live. Will try to fry, thanks for the tip!

 

Yeah, actually this year they seem to be spreading nicely, when they were only a small patch. I have two stands - one under my apple tree and the other under my plum tree.

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2 hours ago, john_b said:

If you go down in the woods today...

 

 

My grandma used to sing me this song for bedtime.

 

RE: bear's leek. Remember to pluck a leaf from each plant rather than uprooting the whole thing, especially in areas where it's not thick.

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