Unannounced visit from debt collection bailiff

91 posts in this topic

12 minutes ago, kiplette said:

Given that this is a forum for English speakers living in Germany, then why does it continue to be surprising and offensive that people whose German is weak come on here for help? The poster is not saying that she thinks it's OK to have crappy German, or that she expected to be able to conduct business in English, she is just explaining why she came on here for assistance. Makes sense really. She is ill, has 2 small kids, and it turns out that her boyfriend has allowed situations to arise/continue which leave her in a difficult position. I think she's doing pretty well to keep it all together at all, really.

 

Well said kiplette.  I couldn't agree more.

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20 hours ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

Me too. Nastiness sometimes has a place, but not in this situation,

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1 hour ago, kiplette said:

 

Given that this is a forum for English speakers living in Germany, then why does it continue to be surprising and offensive that people whose German is weak come on here for help?

 

Who said that this is surprising or offensive? Not me. But the poster writes "Germany has beaten me" – because she has no money to learn German, cannot find a job without knowledge of German etc. 

 

Unfortunately this is not her first thread and I always find it amazing how badly prepared some people are when they come to the country. Whether this is the obligatory health insurance, the fact that the German state cuts child benefit by the amount that can be claimed in the country of origin (according to the rules in the EU), the fact that German officials do not talk English on the phone or whatever else provides reason for complaint ... It's simply a significant lack of research and an excess of many false assumptions that leads to such problems - and it's perfectly legitimate for me (or anyone else) to point that out. 

 

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10 hours ago, someonesdaughter said:

 I always find it amazing how badly prepared some people are when they come to the country. 

 

 

Clearly. Since you feel compelled to comment on this point on each and every thead and when challenged on the appropriateness of this rack it up a gear. Clearly compassion is a emotion that is unfamiliar to you. We get it. Your contempt for stupid foreigners knows no bounds. You do known better. You don‘t need to post such vitriol again.

 

I can only encourage the OP not to forget to take care of herself as well as looking after those around here. Easier said than done with a young family but the ball is firmly in the boyfriends court.

 

 

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12 hours ago, someonesdaughter said:

I always find it amazing how badly prepared some people are when they come to the country. 

 

Many people (especially brits and irish in my experience) believed that schengen etc meant they could come here without doing anything, use their EHIC, not have to learn the language etc etc.

 

FWIW thats pretty much what I thought too, but as I found a job before coming almost everything fell into place.    

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On 3/25/2019, 3:06:12, Deutschland Debs said:

Germany has beaten me. This morning was literally kicking someone when they're already down and beaten.

 

I had that feeling practically all the time once when here in the beginning. You have my sympathies. I've been there.

 

On 3/25/2019, 4:50:17, fraufruit said:

She said she doesn't have anything valuable so I doubt she has receipts. I don't keep any longer than one year unless it is an expensive appliance, etc.

 

Half of our stuff came either from Ikea or similar, and furniture from Ebay! Same here!

 

On 3/26/2019, 11:21:27, Deutschland Debs said:

For those that clearly want to judge- the mother refused my bf all contact with his son after he left. Not even access to phone calls or letters. But still he paid for a long time. No, he didn't have a permanent address, he was a contractor

 

Who knows. But this post was about helping me and my children right now.

 

No it is incorrect to take sides with him or her. It has happened and one must make do.

3 hours ago, Kommentarlos said:

I can only encourage the OP not to forget to take care of herself as well as looking after those around here. Easier said than done with a young family

 

I can't offer any administrative help as those above (I'm impressed with a lot of the advice) but I will say much of the strength for looking after others has to come from the carer, who he/she often forgets to take care of. Hit the local veg shop if possible!

 

Luckily much of the stuff which can improve quality of life is cheap and free. It is spring, so def get outside in fresh air with kids. First thing you may want to do is register with the local food free place "Tafel" if you have little cash - I think you need a card. Also clothes - in our town they have clothing flea markets for women and kids organised by churches. And if you need any household items go to the local Wertstoffhof flea markets. You can actually find loads of coffee makers / Kitchen devices freely there. I got a never used blender recently which is perfect. What's likely is you'll find foreigners there struggling like you! They are often friendly.

 

Good luck.

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Well she said that she was "classed vulnerable adult". So coming here and finding it confusing is what was to be expected. Maybe even slightly more than average. No need for snarky comments. Even Germans find things confusing sometimes.

Well done in not allowing access to a person not providing ID. My 2 pence she can not be held responsible for her bf debts but if there is anything of value which she can't provide proof that it is not his will get a sticker and the owner then needs to prove ownership. Toys unless really exclusive and not possibly in childs possesion are of no interest. Well done in seeing a solicitor for help.

On 3/26/2019, 6:32:42, Deutschland Debs said:

Update :

My boyfriend is seeing a solicitor tomorrow to try and freeze the baliff process on the basis that we can prove they have not followed correct German legal process. They have not given my boyfriend an opportunity to present himself in court and be heard and/or organise payments before permitting baliffs to take action...

   I  Did not like the idea of freezing it on grounds of  not having gotten the opportunity... if the information regarding the fact that he haid paid some time and then stopped is correct he was not denied the opportunity but neglected to ask for help in access to the kids. Leaving the country for 15  years potentially without a note of current address smells of trying to avoid further payment while not realising that officials will then support the family and will ask their money back. Basically wherever you are in the world. The letters probably were all sent to his last known address and its his negligence to provide a postal adress irrespective of whether this changes on weekly basis. So the only way out I can see is asking for a payment scheme. But then he will get solicitors advice. Good luck to you.

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DDebs- good that you and b/f can arrange some plan. 

Good luck with all future plans, and sounds like you really had bad advice. 

Hope life gets easier for you.

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I hope it works out for you. A clean start back in the UK sounds attractive.

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On 3/25/2019, 8:57:17, fraufruit said:

Now I know that they can't take any of her stuff.

 

I wonder how "they" know which stuff is hers?

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1 hour ago, Deutschland Debs said:

So yes, research is important but you can never be ready for every event. 

 

This is absolutely true.  The biggest problem is that you sometimes you just don't know, until you know.  I had similar experience in spite of rigorous planning and obtaining expert advice on certain topics, some of which turned out to be not quite as exact as it could have been. 

 

Lucky for me things turned just so, at just the right time, and I escaped potential disaster, but I can attest that assuming someone got themselves into trouble due to sheer neglect is not a fair assessment in many cases.  Some cases, yes, but it's very, very hard to have a bulletproof move over here.  Even with all the planning and preparation and investigation, my first couple of years here were very stressful due to various surprises, and I was perfectly healthy and well employed!

 

I'm glad you have some good news on this.  Hang in there and let us know how it goes

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Debs - glad to hear the situation is improving. When i came to Germany 18 years ago I ended up in a tiny village 3 hours from Munich in northern Bayern. I had no German whatsoever, but the VHS courses were - actually lousy but I struggled through - my German teacher was a Croatian lady! I think being able to function is critical here, especially in a village. Maybe you could find a German lady who wishes to peak English and swap for her German over coffee in the village cafe.

 

Also check out the "Yellow Page" free papers for the column "Zu verschenken" which means free stuff. As a donor of stuff in the past these adverts are read by many. I once gave away a trampoline in an ad and had 5 calls within hours of the paper coming out. 

 

Also, if you like reading, the local Lions Club (at least near us) organise book flea markets. In ours there are loads of English books. I'm a regular at these and also attend the Munich Book Fair in spring and autumn. Also, the local library may have an English shelf. 

 

Good luck.

 

 

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11 hours ago, catjones said:

 

I wonder how "they" know which stuff is hers?

It's a good point. In uk situations they can take everything excluding anything that is the childrens,  and furniture that is not labelled with fire retardency warnings, laptops and pcs and any smart media that contains personal data, vehicle used for work, everyday machines for caring - cookers, fridges, hoovers, freezer etc. It's up to householders to prove who owns what and if you can't they take it until you can provide documents and then not so easy to get back. My only possession of value is my 'Guild' guitar which I bought for £500 but the reciept does not state the purchaser so I guess that's fair game. Also, if you buy items second hand you won't necessarily have a receipt but the item may still be expensive.  It's a complicated situation.

 

The strange, but positive side to this is that I really thought about my 'posessions ' and I actually realised there's not much that I couldn't walk away from. My things of value are photos and items I have from people I loved that have passed away. I suppose it's like when people suffer a house fire - the only real things of value are your family and your pets. Everything else is replaceable eventually. 

 

Maybe a bit to deep for 9am on a Friday 😁

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8 minutes ago, Deutschland Debs said:

It's a good point. In uk situations they can take everything excluding anything that is the childrens,  ...

 

Yes they can, but normally they are looking for items of value.

 

A toy that cost 40 Euros might only fetch 1, 2 or 3 Euros at auction so it probably is not worth the effort for them, unless there really is enough of them to justify it and then they might sell for example 200 toys toys for 200 euros in a single batch.  But if they are trying to clear a debt for 5k Euros then even 200 euros does not make a big dent.

 

Of course XBoxes, playstation & games normally hold their value.

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41 minutes ago, Deutschland Debs said:

The strange, but positive side to this is that I really thought about my 'posessions ' and I actually realised there's not much that I couldn't walk away from. 

 

And the things you couldn’t walk away from are of sentimental value and likely completely worthless to the bailiff. 

 

When a house is on fire, few people try to rescue the vacuum cleaner. 

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1 hour ago, A.N.Other said:

..

 

When a house is on fire, few people try to rescue the vacuum cleaner. 

 

I don't know, she can also cook pretty well!  :D

 

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14 hours ago, Deutschland Debs said:

So now he must visit the local court to obtain full information about the debt because apparently this is not detailed on the bailiffs letter. Then my bf can offer a regular payment based on our current financial situation.

 

Why would the bailiff even come if your boyfriend does the above?

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4 hours ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

I don't know, she can also cook pretty well!  :D

 

 

If that was true, there wouldn’t have been a fire in the first place. ;)

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On 29/03/2019, 10:03:23, A.N.Other said:

When a house is on fire, few people try to rescue the vacuum cleaner. 

 

Lol.  Nice one!

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