Baptism in Evangelical Church

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I can’t find the thread for this specific topic. Does anyone maybe know how I can go about having my child baptized? We pay yearly tax to Evangelical church so I guess that is the denomination we technically belong to. What are the steps that we need to do? Do we need to personally visit an Evangelical church to set a date or is it possible to do over the phone? Do we need to bring papers stating that we pay yearly tax to the Evangelical church for them to accept us? Is there a fee for baptism? Is it possible to get baptized at any denomination (eg. Lutheran, Catholic, etc.) even if we pay our taxes to Evangelical church?

 

Thank you so much for any answer you can offer. 

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I cant say for sure, but in all my dealings with churches they have expected people to show up and make half a show of being part of the congregation.  Id imagine having never met you they wouldnt be too impressed with you trying to book it over the phone.  

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6 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

I cant say for sure, but in all my dealings with churches they have expected people to show up and make half a show of being part of the congregation.  Id imagine having never met you they wouldnt be too impressed with you trying to book it over the phone.  

 

This holds true from where I came from. Many churches refuse you if you don’t really go to church there. I also do not go to church here but my spouse and I pay yearly tax to the Evangelical church. My friend who also do not go to church, pay yearly tax and got married to a church near our home. So I guess it is possible to ask for service even if you do not attend the congregation. 

 

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A friend of mine pays church tax while his wife doesn't.  As far as I know, they never go to church.  He wanted their kids to be baptized and because he's really crap at getting stuff done, it didn't happen until they were like 3 and 8 yrs. old.  They did it at a nearby church.  They needed godparents who are also members (pay tax) to the church.  You can also have godparents who aren't in the church but you can have many, you need at least one who is paying church tax.  I don't know if he had to pay for it but I wouldn't be surprised.  The pastor is coming out to do it, there was some assistant there too as I recall.  I don't suppose they work for free.

 

I'd say go to a nearby church and talk to the pastor.  If they say you must come to church on a regular basis etc., try another.

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22 minutes ago, LeonG said:

A friend of mine pays church tax while his wife doesn't.  As far as I know, they never go to church.  He wanted their kids to be baptized and because he's really crap at getting stuff done, it didn't happen until they were like 3 and 8 yrs. old.  They did it at a nearby church.  They needed godparents who are also members (pay tax) to the church.  You can also have godparents who aren't in the church but you can have many, you need at least one who is paying church tax.  I don't know if he had to pay for it but I wouldn't be surprised.  The pastor is coming out to do it, there was some assistant there too as I recall.  I don't suppose they work for free.

 

I'd say go to a nearby church and talk to the pastor.  If they say you must come to church on a regular basis etc., try another.

 

Thank you for the tip. 

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2 hours ago, LeonG said:

I don't know if he had to pay for it but I wouldn't be surprised.  The pastor is coming out to do it, there was some assistant there too as I recall.  I don't suppose they work for free.

 

Regarding payment, I would always give a contribution but this is because I'm Irish (no church taxes) and it is expected that you pay. In Germany, because you are already paying church tax, it is a little more discretionary whether you make a donation. 

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Ring up your nearest Church and ask THEM??

Not sure I understand why you bother - a christening is not a joke or a "let's have a party and presents" occasion you know. You clearly have zero interest or knowledge in Religion.

 

And of course you can't just have a Catholic Christening! You must be an active member of the Church, understand its doctrines and what it means and entails. It's a first step in the journey, and carries duties and responsibilities.

 

I really don't understand this line of thinking.

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1 hour ago, camlough said:

You clearly have zero interest or knowledge in Religion.

 

And of course you can't just have a Catholic Christening!

 

I am a non denominational born again Christian. I went to church every Sunday and attended Sunday school as a child. Since I gave birth and now have a toddler, I have been unable to go to church yet as it would be hard. But thanks for the assumption. I did mention my spouse and I pay yearly tax to the EVANGELICAL church. 

 

 

 

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Here's some information on how to go about it: https://www.evangelisch.de/inhalte/113490/15-02-2015/die-haeufigsten-fragen-zur-taufe

 

What documents do we need for the baptism of our child?
Please contact your local church office to arrange an appointment for the pre-baptism talk and the baptism itself. There you will learn everything you need to know. As a rule, the godparents need a certificate from the parish office at their place of residence confirming that they are entitled to the sponsorship office. If you as parents have a family register, please bring it with you to the christening. In any case, please bring the child's birth certificate and your identity cards with you.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

 

And:

 

Can you have your child baptized if both parents are not in church?
The decision as to whether a baptism is possible despite the lack of membership of both parents is made locally in the responsible parish. In addition, the regulations vary from church to church.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

 

How much is the baptism?
Baptism is free of charge for the children of church members. Only if you wish special floral decorations or unusual musical interludes do you incur costs.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

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29 minutes ago, bramble said:

Here's some information on how to go about it: https://www.evangelisch.de/inhalte/113490/15-02-2015/die-haeufigsten-fragen-zur-taufe

 

What documents do we need for the baptism of our child?
Please contact your local church office to arrange an appointment for the pre-baptism talk and the baptism itself. There you will learn everything you need to know. As a rule, the godparents need a certificate from the parish office at their place of residence confirming that they are entitled to the sponsorship office. If you as parents have a family register, please bring it with you to the christening. In any case, please bring the child's birth certificate and your identity cards with you.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

 

And:

 

Can you have your child baptized if both parents are not in church?
The decision as to whether a baptism is possible despite the lack of membership of both parents is made locally in the responsible parish. In addition, the regulations vary from church to church.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

 

How much is the baptism?
Baptism is free of charge for the children of church members. Only if you wish special floral decorations or unusual musical interludes do you incur costs.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

 

Thank you so much. This is very helpful. 

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20 hours ago, thegreatdivide said:

Is it possible to get baptized at any denomination (eg. Lutheran, Catholic, etc.) even if we pay our taxes to Evangelical church?

In Germany, the Evangelical Church is the Lutheran Church.  Just to keep things in focus. :) 

I think even in a country with Kirchensteuer, a friendly donation to the pastor would be welcome.

And I have a question - are home/hotel/outdoors christenings allowed in Germany?

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2 minutes ago, katheliz said:

And I have a question - are home/hotel/outdoors christenings allowed in Germany?

 

Google seems to think so.  I found some reports of people having it at their house.  I guess if the pastor is willing..

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In some countries, baptismal certificate are sometimes required to get some government issued IDs if one lacks official requirements. Does it hold any certain significance in Germany?

 

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15 minutes ago, thegreatdivide said:

In some countries, baptismal certificate are sometimes required to get some government issued IDs if one lacks official requirements. Does it hold any certain significance in Germany?

 

Since so many people here aren't members of the church, I can't imagine it would be needed for anything other than something religious.  For example, baptism is one criteria for confirmation so you could prove that with a certificate should you need to.  Should your child want to marry in church, they will probably need it as well.

 

For other things, there is birth certificate, official ID, passport etc.

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6 hours ago, thegreatdivide said:

I am a non denominational born again Christian. I went to church every Sunday and attended Sunday school as a child. Since I gave birth and now have a toddler, I have been unable to go to church yet as it would be hard. But thanks for the assumption. I did mention my spouse and I pay yearly tax to the EVANGELICAL church. 

 

 

This still makes no sense. The non-denominational church you were going to before having the child presumably needs your cash - why on earth support the Lutheran Church if you are for example Freie Evangelische, or something.

 

If you have actually not been attending as an adult, and having the child baptised is a part of reviving your faith, then it is surely important to find a congregation in which you are comfortable, and get into the habit of attending, and become part of that community.

 

Obviously it needs to be one which welcomes small kids - there is one in a town near us which has a baby zone at the back with a big glass window and a speaker in the room so you can hear the service whilst not needing to keep the child quiet, for example.  

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1 hour ago, kiplette said:

 

 

 

This still makes no sense. The non-denominational church you were going to before having the child presumably needs your cash - why on earth support the Lutheran Church if you are for example Freie Evangelische, or something.

 

If you have actually not been attending as an adult, and having the child baptised is a part of reviving your faith, then it is surely important to find a congregation in which you are comfortable, and get into the habit of attending, and become part of that community.

 

Obviously it needs to be one which welcomes small kids - there is one in a town near us which has a baby zone at the back with a big glass window and a speaker in the room so you can hear the service whilst not needing to keep the child quiet, for example.  

 

When I said “as a child” I assumed it was clear that I was not born in Germany (like many of us here) because if I was, and am a German citizen I would not be in TT. 

 

I guess I did not explain it good. When I was in my home country, I went to church every Sunday. When I moved here to Germany, I did not have any child. I had my child here in Germany less than a year after I moved here. My child is now a toddler. Ever since my child was born, I have not been able to go to church. 

 

Also, I registered in Evangelical church because I thought it was the most relevant denomination I could choose in regards to my faith AND I had no idea that not choosing a church was also an option.

 

Having my child baptized is not a way of reviving my faith. I have always had my faith. Even though I have not yet gone to church here, my family have daily devotion and we read our bible and pray together. 

 

With the last suggestion, I have already made an inquiry and that has been settled. Cetainly, being a part of a congregations is really important. It is always great to be a part of a village that support one another. 

 

My original post was really only about:

 

1. Steps to do in having our child baptized. 

2. How to set an appointment with the church. 

3. Required documents that we need. 

4. The possibility of being baptized in any church other than the denomination we registered in. 

 

And my inquiry have already been answered by @bramble . It was very helpful. 

 

Thank you for your input though. 🙂

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It sounds like you are a real born-again Christian, as I understand it, from what you say. Judging from what I've experienced when attending the state Lutheran church (most that I visited seemed to not have born-again pastors),I would definitely not baptize my child in that church, but look for a church I actually want to attend and then baptize the child there.

I also, years ago, said I was evangelisch, as you did, since it was the closest thing, I thought. However, I was able to easily get out of the church and didn't have to officially get out, but just wrote a letter saying it was a mistake. I preferred to support my own free church.

Of course, if you want to continue to support the church with your taxes and want your child to be a member of the state church, that is your choice. I'd say the first step is to go to whatever church you choose and see how you like it. Then I would probably just ask the pastor about baptism information.

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Around where I live there are various free churches so I would imagine if you looked around a bit you might find something very suitable in Munich. The Evangelisch or Lutheran state churches are very different in form than I guess you are used to and may well not scratch where you itch. I, too, have not settled in a church since I moved here, although I am from the very liberal end of the church so actually the pervading ideas of the Evangelisch Church are much closer to my views than most protestant churches in the UK, although I find there is a stiffness overall in church; it is less of a social+worship thing, more just worship.

 

However, in my previous life in the UK I worked for a Christian book and music publisher and we had European sales conferences where representatives from Germany came and there was clearly a lot going on in the more pentcostal wing in Germany. So I imagine that ‘seek and ye will find’ is possible for you as you live in a big city. I know there are some more US-style churches near Düsseldorf/Köln for example.

 

If you would really like your child to integrate into the faith here, then I would say the evangelische Kirche is a good option. They seem to have loads of events for kids, even in the small village where I now live, the confirmation thing is big, and there is money for these groups because of the church tax. But if you want to eventually find something for yourself too, you may have to look farther afield. But maybe don’t leave it too late if it is important to you - my Sunday mornings are always booked up now, and I no longer have a church-shaped gap in my life, I am happy enough without it.

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23 hours ago, Auntie Helen said:

If you would really like your child to integrate into the faith here, then I would say the evangelische Kirche is a good option. They seem to have loads of events for kids, even in the small village where I now live, the confirmation thing is big, and there is money for these groups because of the church tax. But if you want to eventually find something for yourself too, you may have to look farther afield. 

 

This I will definitely keep in mind. Thank you. 

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On 3/24/2019, 5:27:52, JN53 said:

It sounds like you are a real born-again Christian, as I understand it, from what you say. Judging from what I've experienced when attending the state Lutheran church (most that I visited seemed to not have born-again pastors),I would definitely not baptize my child in that church, but look for a church I actually want to attend and then baptize the child there.

I also, years ago, said I was evangelisch, as you did, since it was the closest thing, I thought. However, I was able to easily get out of the church and didn't have to officially get out, but just wrote a letter saying it was a mistake. I preferred to support my own free church.

Of course, if you want to continue to support the church with your taxes and want your child to be a member of the state church, that is your choice. I'd say the first step is to go to whatever church you choose and see how you like it. Then I would probably just ask the pastor about baptism information.

 

This has enlightened me. I personally would like to find a suitable church for family and there I will have my child baptized. My spouse and I will also make time change the denomination we belong to in KVR. Thank you. 

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