Retirement in Germany

26 posts in this topic

 

2 hours ago, Pfaelzer said:

Gerrmany and the US allow dual citizenship, according to the US state Department web site.

 

You can be a dual citizen if you are born one (eg one parent German, one US) but if you naturalise it is different.

Can I automatically lose my German citizenship?

Section 25 of the Nationality Act

Yes. Any German citizen who applies for and acquires foreign citizenship, whether in Germany or abroad, automatically loses his or her German citizenship. This occurs automatically by law; you do not have to make a special declaration or notify the German authorities. And it makes no difference how you acquired German citizenship. To avoid losing your German citizenship in this way, you must apply for and be granted permission to retain your German citizenship before acquiring foreign citizenship. When issuing passports, registering births, processing the subsequent immigration of family members, etc., the authorities make sure the persons in question are still German citizens. Possessing a German passport or identity card does not in itself constitute proof of citizenship. In case of doubt, a test to determine nationality can be carried out.

 

https://www.bmi.bund.de/SharedDocs/faqs/EN/themen/migration/staatsang/Verlust_der_deutschen_Staatsangehoerigkeit_en.html

 

 

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7 hours ago, Pfaelzer said:

Germany and the US allow dual citizenship, according to the US state Department web site

Yes, but as far as I know when coming of age (or is it at 21 years?) non EU-citizens have to choose which one to keep and you will lose German citizenship if you don´t give up the American one (unless you can demonstrate good reasons why you need both).

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one of my work colleagues, came to Germany ( from England ), wife his UK wife - had a son in Munich.

 

Because of BREXIT, the son was asking about citizenship, he was told that you can get Germany citizenship, because you he was born in Germany, but only if you apply up to the year od 23 years old. So now the sone is 26 years old he has now automatic right to get German Citizenship - he must take the normal rout lke everybody else. 

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2 minutes ago, yesterday said:

because you he was born in Germany,

I doubt that was the reason as Germany applies "jus sanguinis" rather than "jus soli" i. e. citizenship is passed on along the blood line irrespective of where you´re born. But the rules regarding dual citizenship are different for EU-citizens anyway.

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that's what I was told the day before yesterday, by the father of the son.

 

I did not check any accuracy, I just took it at face value, and re-stated here - if he was wrong sorry

Just thought I would repeat it here as it may help

 

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3 minutes ago, yesterday said:

that's what I was told the day before yesterday, by the father of the son.

 

I did not check any accuracy, I just took it at face value, and re-stated here - if he was wrong sorry

Just thought I would repeat it here as it may help

 

Nothing wrong with that. I just think that there must have been different reasons such as time spent in Germany, command of German language, visiting German schools etc. But I don´t know the exact requirements - I just remember reading that things like that can be relevant. What I know for sure though is that there are different rules for EU vs. non-EU citizens.

Germany wanted to avoid having to give dual citizenship as much as possible - except for French citizens (because of the desire to mend relations after having fought 3 wars within one person´s lifetime). However, because of EU rules which don´t allow discriminating against other EU citizens Germany had to choose between either allowing all qualifying EU citizens to get dual citizenship or not the French either. They choose the former.

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