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I need help for main supply chain management terms explanations from a german students or professionals

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Dear Friends,

 

I studied Industrial engineering in English. As I want continue to my career in Germany. I faced with some major terms in SCM area.

I know probably what they mean if somebody explain. However as those words are german I did not understand to which englisch words do they correspond.

 

If you could explain those terms briefly (what do they mean, which tasks do they refer under supply chain and etc...)   together with direct english translations, that will be great help for me.

 

1- eskalationsmanagement

2- spedition

3- kommisionierung

4- disponent  (what is disponent but also what is the difference between it and einkauf, because one friend said that it is the same as einkauf)

 

 

Apart from that I would like to also ask what sachbearbeiter is in Germany?  For example I have bachelor + master.  If I apply to sacharbeiter position, will I be accepted for those kind of positions? and if so, will it be seem bad in my CV working as a sachbearbeiter?

 

Thanks in advance.

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5 hours ago, Doruis said:

1- eskalationsmanagement

2- spedition

3- kommisionierung

4- disponent 

 

1- ramp-up management  - commonly refers to the phase(s) between full-size mock-up, pre-production model and product job #1

2 - haulage, trucking, transport undertaking

3 - stock picking - covers area from selection of multiple items from shelves to ready-to-ship pallet to truck-load of pallets on loading dock

4 - despatcher - usually responsible for planning and booking actions of 2 and 3

 

Sachbearbeiter is a general term used in connection with many types of activity which infers some level of recognized specialist knowledge and training - when reading job ads ask yourself (honestly and critically) whether your knowledge and training covers the requirements listed in the job description - if it does and you feel confident then don't be shy - apply!

 

Depending on the level of responsibility and income a Sachbearbeiter post could be filled by someone with a 2 or 3 year apprenticeship (Ausbildung) or may require a bachelors degree or higher. The lower qualified ones being individuals reporting to a more senior supervisor and so on. Whether it would look good on your CV may depend on how much responsibility (e.g.; product value, product volume, dept budget, number of people supervised, etc..) it involved.

 

2B

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14 hours ago, 2B_orNot2B said:

 

1- ramp-up management  - commonly refers to the phase(s) between full-size mock-up, pre-production model and product job #1

2 - haulage, trucking, transport undertaking

3 - stock picking - covers area from selection of multiple items from shelves to ready-to-ship pallet to truck-load of pallets on loading dock

4 - despatcher - usually responsible for planning and booking actions of 2 and 3

 

Sachbearbeiter is a general term used in connection with many types of activity which infers some level of recognized specialist knowledge and training - when reading job ads ask yourself (honestly and critically) whether your knowledge and training covers the requirements listed in the job description - if it does and you feel confident then don't be shy - apply!

 

Depending on the level of responsibility and income a Sachbearbeiter post could be filled by someone with a 2 or 3 year apprenticeship (Ausbildung) or may require a bachelors degree or higher. The lower qualified ones being individuals reporting to a more senior supervisor and so on. Whether it would look good on your CV may depend on how much responsibility (e.g.; product value, product volume, dept budget, number of people supervised, etc..) it involved.

 

2B

18 hours ago, deadsoul said:

Thanks for the clear explanations.

 

 

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18 hours ago, deadsoul said:

It will seem bad if you don't know how to use a dictionary.

 

https://dict.tu-chemnitz.de

I am using dictionary to learn language but not a engineering or business discipline. My question includes explanations based on experience and also some other technical terms rather than getting only a direct translation. Both things are different. Direct translation I got from dictionary somehow useless

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16 hours ago, 2B_orNot2B said:

4 - despatcher

 

Ooops! That word should have been spelt (or, for non-Scots, spelled) dispatcher.

Sorry.

 

2B

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I would translate eskalationmanagement by swapping the 'k' with a 'c'.

To escalate would be to call the next higher manager to put pressure on staff to 'get on with it'

 

Something to do before the sh*t hits the ventilator.

 

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5 hours ago, HH_Sailor said:

I would translate eskalationmanagement by swapping the 'k' with a 'c'.

To escalate would be to call the next higher manager to put pressure on staff to 'get on with it'

 

Something to do before the sh*t hits the ventilator.

 

 

That sounds good and it's clear that you brought logical thinking to the party, but in the field of supply chain management organisation (SCMO) there is a specific nomenclature and the German 'Eskalationsmanagement' does in fact equate to the (US) English term 'ramp-up management'.

 

It originated during the 1970s in the US automobile industry and its use has since spread throughout most production industries worldwide.

 

Albeit the primary responsibility of everyone involved in ramp-up management is indeed to prevent any brown stuff ever hitting a fan. ;)

 

2B

 

ETA:

IMO whoever settled on the usage of that translation to German did do a poor job of it, which is not untypical for German business or engineering translations. Apparently whoever had charge of playing with the 'Wortbausatze' (TM) on the day chose their selection based on the assumption that 'ramp = escaltor'

 

I've often thought Vorproduktionsmanagement would have expressed a more obvious and accurate description of the actual meaning.

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Happy to learn something new :rolleyes:

 

My definition of escalation management is how we as IT managers as well as project managers used the term.

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1- Eskalationsmanagement ramp-up management - CHECK

2- Spedition - freight forwarding (not "haulage, trucking, transport undertaking": this is done by Frachtführer (= carriers, which just carries

    goods from Point A to Point B. Full stop.). A "Spedition" does all that plus - for example - warehousing, customs clearance etc. (sort of full

    service

3- Kommisionierung - stock-picking - CHECK (essentially making up orders)

4- Disponent - scheduler

Source: Benz / Wessels: "Wörterbuch Logistik (Deutsch-Englisch" (Cornelsen).

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