Moving from Australia to be with my Girlfriend - Could this be possible?

38 posts in this topic

A friend of mine has used Mawista to insure visiting relatives.  In his wife's case, he said they always paid.  In his nephews case, they refused to pay his trip to see a doctor because they claimed it was not an emergency.  I think if you want to use that kind of insurance, you would have to be prepared to pay for regular doctors visits but if you really have an emergency and go to the ER, they would pay. 

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1 hour ago, jeba said:

 

As a non-EU citizen you need to pass the "Vorrangprüfung" which means the employer must be able to claim that he can´t find an EU citizen for the job. Usually very difficult for low skilled jobs.

 

 

Hypothetically if we were to get married, do you know if this test would still apply?

 

1 hour ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

 

Not strictly true, it depends on the condition, policy, and circumstances.  

There are even some companies which specialise in such policies.  Of course you can expect to pay more.  Or it could be that certain treatments might not be covered, so he would have to cover the cost himself.

I don't know how much the medication costs, he says they are expensive, but then it might still be possible to pay for this himself and he just has to factor this into the cost.

 

Certainly any insurance company will not (willingly) accept to pay 1000s in treatment for a policy that cost a few hundred.  It does not make sense!  And that might be the issue in the end.

 

 

 

In my experience travel insurers aren't willing to cover my condition. The medications I am on are over $5,000 per dose (of which I pay around $60 in Aus) every 8 weeks. I haven't ever looked into these specialised travel insurances but my gut feeling is they wouldn't touch anyone like me. 

 

I've read that you only need travel insurance in order to get the working holiday visa and to cover you while you're not working. If you then find a job in Germany paying over the threshold, you would still be able to access the public health insurance system. Whether travel insurance excluding my condition would be sufficient is the question... I'll need to look into it further.

 

I wonder if there's any declaration I could make to say if I ever needed extensive treatment I would return to Australia? I imagine not... 

 

 

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4 hours ago, jeba said:

Problem is this will only work for those who can find a job. But what about people with preexisting conditions that make it impossible to work? Or who are simply can´t find a job for whatever reason?

 

They'll have trouble immigrating to Germany anyway. Other than as a spouse or parent of a minor German child, there's nothing to be done. 

 

4 hours ago, jeba said:

 

I feel the Basistarif at least should be made available for them.

 

That's weird, hearing that from you of all people!? So private companies should be forced to do minus business? 

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, dhaus said:

Hypothetically if we were to get married, do you know if this test would still apply?

 

No, if you got married, you would get temporary residency to start with and after 3 years, you can go for permanent.  

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4 hours ago, dhaus said:

Seems like the process is much harder for me to enter Germany and work than it was for her to come to Australia :mellow: 

The process for you to enter and work in Germany is straight-forward as an Australian, it is complicated because you are looking to migrate and you have a preexisting medical condition. Australia is very easy to migrate to if you are young, healthy, English-speaking and well educated. If you aren't those things it really isn't straight forward, or even at times possible. 

 

If you are serious about this the simplest way is to get married. Do it in Australia as the paperwork at both ends of the marriage (should it come to that) will be simpler. If you don't want to go that route the options others have laid out are what you need to do. The Vorrangsprinzip doesn't seem to be a massive barrier (based on reported success stories here), particularly if you can get a creative position through your partners family. Surely they want to acquire a business in Australia and as part of their due diligence want to employ an Australian accountant who is based in Germany? ;)

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28 minutes ago, Auswanderer said:

Surely they want to acquire a business in Australia and as part of their due diligence want to employ an Australian accountant who is based in Germany? ;)

Had to give a greenie for that.

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1 hour ago, someonesdaughter said:

That's weird, hearing that from you of all people!?

Not sue what you mean? As I stated before I´m not against immigration per se - just against dual citizenship.

1 hour ago, dhaus said:

Hypothetically if we were to get married, do you know if this test would still apply?

It wouldn´t.

 

1 hour ago, dhaus said:

Whether travel insurance excluding my condition would be sufficient is the question... I'll need to look into it further.

I guess it would. The immigration office will not know that you have a preexisting condition. You won´t have to declare that to them.

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Why would immigration to Germany affect the dividends I might receive? I don´t hold a single German stock - or Euro stock for that matter. But let´s not sidetrack this thread. You´re welcome to open another one for that and I´ll be happy to discuss my points of view there.

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15 minutes ago, jeba said:

Why would immigration to Germany affect the dividends I might receive? I don´t hold a single German stock - or Euro stock for that matter. But let´s not sidetrack this thread. You´re welcome to open another one for that and I´ll be happy to discuss my points of view there.

 

If you are German resident, then you are taxed on your worldwide income.

 

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1 minute ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

If you are German resident, then you are taxed on your worldwide income.

 

But I´m not. And that I´d have to pay tax on German sourced dividends is one of the reasons why I don´t buy German stocks.

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1 hour ago, jeba said:

Why would immigration to Germany affect the dividends I might receive?

 

Please don't play dumb. It was not about immigration, but about your demand:

 

Quote

I feel the Basistarif at least should be made available for them

 

So you're expecting private insurers to do a minus deal. That's pretty strange for someone who calls unions "terrorist" organisations because strike action could have a negative impact on dividends ... 

 

 

Quote

You´re welcome to open another one for that and I´ll be happy to discuss my points of view there.

 

Just keep your general demands out of this thread. 

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27 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

That's pretty strange for someone who calls unions "terrorist" organisations because strike action could have a negative impact on dividends ... 

You´re putting words into my mouth. That wasn´t my reason.

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On 21/02/2019, 8:11:28, jeba said:

Btw, being the father of a German child living in Germany would also entitle you for a residence permit. You don´t have to be married. Just saying.

I did exactly this, My partner left me and moved back to Germany. I got a 1yr visa which runs out this coming September. When I received it - the lady told me if I lived with my child, the visa would have been a 3yr visa.

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Which brings us onto the whole social aspect of moving. Be aware that if you become the father of a German child and the (non) mariage goes pear-shaped, custody battles usually favour the mother and you would have the choice between having to stay geographically close to your child until the child comes of age or abandoning the child as well as the mother. Forget moving back to Oz with kid in tow. Plenty of heart-rending stuff about this on TT.

 

Also read up about culture shock, difficulty of adapting to German life, making friends, etc. As a foreigner without language skills you will find yourself literally dis-empowered for many moons, which will change the balance of power in the relationship with your girlfriend - and others. When you start life in a foreign language and cultural setting you lose a lot of your personality and influence. Integration is a long bumpy climb and all uphill.

 

Excuse me for wondering if after 3 years together with your gf and still not ready for mariage if she is really the one for you? Maybe you should be addressing this question before all the other stuff about moving to Germany.

 

 

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5 hours ago, LimeGreenJelly said:

the visa would have been a 3yr visa.

The parent of a German child will get residence permits until the child is 18. And AFAIK this time counts towards residency requirements for other types of visa / permanent residence.

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11 hours ago, optimista said:

Which brings us onto the whole social aspect of moving. Be aware that if you become the father of a German child and the (non) mariage goes pear-shaped, custody battles usually favour the mother and you would have the choice between having to stay geographically close to your child until the child comes of age or abandoning the child as well as the mother. Forget moving back to Oz with kid in tow. Plenty of heart-rending stuff about this on TT.

 

Also read up about culture shock, difficulty of adapting to German life, making friends, etc. As a foreigner without language skills you will find yourself literally dis-empowered for many moons, which will change the balance of power in the relationship with your girlfriend - and others. When you start life in a foreign language and cultural setting you lose a lot of your personality and influence. Integration is a long bumpy climb and all uphill.

 

Excuse me for wondering if after 3 years together with your gf and still not ready for mariage if she is really the one for you? Maybe you should be addressing this question before all the other stuff about moving to Germany.

 

 

 

I would never consider putting myself, my girlfriend or a future child in that position - definitely not an option that I would consider in the slightest given the circumstances and the fact that we are in no way ready for children separately to this situation we are facing.

 

The culture shock and adaptation factor is basically what I have been considering deeply for the last month since this all came up. At this point she has basically confirmed that she needs to go home either with or without me, wants me to come with her but understands it is a massive sacrifice that I need to be prepared to make. Basically my thought process is:

 

Option 1. Go with her firstly on a working holiday visa (as long as I can get appropriate travel insurance). Learn as much German as possible, try to find a job & immerse myself as much as I can (I know this is easier said that done). I feel as though I would know after 6 or so months whether it has any hope of working long term, and if it doesn't, I will be much happier knowing that we tried than if we didn't bother to try at all. If it didn't work out, I could return to Australia being fully qualified and am sure I can find another job (or hopefully even at the same company) quite easily. At this point I'm leaning more towards this option.

 

Option 2. We break up and she leaves without me. Definitely the more practical option as there is a clear path for me the progress within the company I work for and increase my income. I'll be far more financially secure and the future will be more clear. However, I am only 25 and this is the only 'real' job I have ever had. The more I think about it, the more moving abroad seems like it would be a far more fulfilling/interesting experience than spending the next 5 years sitting behind a desk wondering what could have been, even if things didn't work out and it proved to be temporary.

 

I wouldn't say we aren't 'ready' for marriage necessarily, it's more that we are both young (she is 22) and she is yet to study and begin a career she wants to pursue long term. She also is yet to obtain permanent residency in Australia. A 22 and 25 year old getting married would be unusual by Australian standards... most people don't get married until closer to 30 at least in my experience (not that age is necessarily relevant). Basically it's just not something we have really considered yet as we had no reason to... our relationship was definitely progressing naturally and we have light heatedly discussed getting married in the future for sure.

 

Just trying to provide some context! thanks for the feedback anyway :)

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Or option 3, let her go and continue the relationship and work out later if you want to break up or if one of you is ready to sacrifice and move to stay with the other one.  You can look into going on a working holiday and see what happens.  Maybe in a year or two, you will be ready to get married in order to make it easier for you to live together in either country.

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