Cologne Brexit Meeting - Wed 13th Feb

158 posts in this topic

7 minutes ago, Metall said:

 

Better get another drink real quick. :D

 

 

Wonderful how you have overcome your announced sight disability to read this, brave almost.

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Metall said:

 

Better get another drink real quick. :D

 

Stir, stir, stir.

 

You never answered my question on the unhappy thread.

 

Did the friends who wanted to split up you and your hubby want to take turns or want a threesome?

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10 hours ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

The UK Government have not said that EU nationals will have to have B1 to get settled status.

I want to tell RenegadeFurther somewhere here that taking a German language course can be interesting, even fun, it's also very practical as the textbooks are aimed at daily life situations, and you get to meet new people from other countries, who, just like you, are adults struggling with the grammar, the homework, nervous about the tests, etc.

 

That said, the courses can be very tiring, 4 hrs. a day at 5 days a week for a crash course at least. This can be an overload and you may need to take a break between the course levels to sort of let what you are learning soak in and also to try and apply a bit of the vocab etc. to your daily life out and about in Germany.

 

Starting out at 42, I wasn't a great student of any foreign language. I had to repeat a few levels even just to pass the tests but I am proud that when I hit so many fences here, I just kept trying until I got enough right that I could pass the tests. I did pleanty of complaining at home along the way! There were people doing worse than me in some levels, there were whizz kids doing so much better too. I was the oldest student, whatever the class, but  the youth who liked to meet up for coffee after class always invited anyone to join, so I went sometimes and felt welcomed.

 

At a crash course speed you can get through the B1 test in about 6 months I think. That sounds like an eternity when you just want to get it over with but along the way you may find yourself enjoying the process. It was a way to get out of my village home and out and about in Germany with a goal in mind. After the B1 test was passed, I started struggling to read German books, and it took some months before I could understand just the plot of a young adult level book but when it started to 'click' it was very exciting to notice I actually had made that progress I swore I just never could make. 

 

So please, don't be scared of B1, don't worry too much about it even. Get to class and see how it goes for you. I never knew how it would go! In A1 I thought, 'Can I pass this?' and when I did, I was happy about it and then back to, 'can I pass A2?' etc. Some days are progress and some are like 'oh no, I'll never get this!!!!' but a good teacher will be there to guide you, answer questions etc. and you have classmates to turn to for input, support, even inspiration at times. 

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Guys this isn't about who NEEDS to speak eachothers' country language. It is about RECIPROCITY. Good or bad. 

 

So much noise has been made from both sides about reciprocating. Deal or no deal. Yet here we are, just another inconsistency (this time it is Germany not reciprocating no fee / no language requirement, but it could equally be the UK not reciprocating some other aspect)

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Just imagine Theresa going to Brussels and saying : " ok, this is my deal. You have at least B1 skills in Welsh or bugger off.."

That would be fun...

;)

Over to you, hoops!

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21 minutes ago, cybil said:

I want to tell RenegadeFurther somewhere here that taking a German language course can be interesting, even fun, it's also very practical as the textbooks are aimed at daily life situations, and you get to meet new people from other countries, who, just like you, are adults struggling with the grammar, the homework, nervous about the tests, etc.

 

That said, the courses can be very tiring, 4 hrs. a day at 5 days a week for a crash course at least. This can be an overload and you may need to take a break between the course levels to sort of let what you are learning soak in and also to try and apply a bit of the vocab etc. to your daily life out and about in Germany.

 

cyb that's an amazing achievment. I wish more TTers had your positive outlook on life. You have that optimism which i associate with American "can do", especially at 42. I did the Goethe "SuperIntensiv" in my 30s, 5 hours a day for 8 weeks - bloody exhausting. I've also done extra classes to C1 in VHS but I got fed up woth the lesson material - we had to read Bernard Schlink all about concentration camps which is a subject I really really do not want to know about so I dropped it. I'm fluent enough living here in the sticks, until I meet a Bayerisch bugger who rabbits away and I smile and pretend to hear him! All that VHS stuff goes out the window!

 

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I hardly visit these forums since facebook and co, but am I the only one who is stressed out - just a tad - by two years of this crap? 

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8 minutes ago, john g. said:

Just imagine Theresa going to Brussels and saying : " ok, this is my deal. You have at least B1 skills in Welsh or bugger off.."

That would be fun...

;)

Over to you, hoops!

 

Ah Welsh, even my Welsh skills are not that good, but oh no you have me digging up the 3rd National Anthem, after the 2nd which is Calon Lan:

 

 

"Ry' ni'n  yma o hyd". And Calon lan:

 

 

Sometimes in a Welsh pub the lads will break into some of these, stand on the seats and yell them or Mae hen Wlad fy Nhadau, or Sosban Bach. Always awesome.

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4 hours ago, AlexTr said:

I think that's going to be a thing now, isn't it? Lots of Brits who were okay with Brexit upset that they are being treated just like Pakistanis, Algerians, Indians, and (gasp!) Americans.

 

But it's been said on here that American spouses are exempt from language requirements, so British people won't quite be treated like Americans... and also, doesn't 911 connect to the emergency services when in Hessen? I don't think 999 works here either! :P

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Truly beautiful, jeremy! I am all in favour of protecting minority languages! And Welsh  is gorgeous.

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2 minutes ago, Mackle said:

 

But it's been said on here that American spouses are exempt from language requirements, so British people won't quite be treated like Americans... and also, doesn't 911 connect to the emergency services when in Hessen? I don't think 999 works here either! :P

 

No, we aren't. I am the American spouse of a German national and I needed B1 for a permanent residence card.

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18 minutes ago, Mackle said:

 

But it's been said on here that American spouses are exempt from language requirements, so British people won't quite be treated like Americans...

 

The key there of course is that 100% of us are here as individuals, freely, in our own right.    Not one Briton is in Germany is on any sort of family or spouse or employed or obligation basis.

 

We do not know what will happen.  I do think that is an interesting question because I am hearing a lot of people who express concern getting "it is OK, your spouse is German" (or indeed other EU is enough).   And I guess it may well be and would thus quite possibly be normal non-EU spouse requirements.  However, not even the happiest married person always automatically wants individual rights replaced by rights depending on their marriage, and sadly also not all marriages last.      (And is the quid pro quo of no language requirement on family basis usually that you cannot work, at least initially?) 

  

Same goes with stuff like "it`s OK, you have a secure job".   Well yes  - and again no idea how it will work - but not everyone wants to have their life here suddenly directly tied to the employer they happen to have, or even employment more generally etc.

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14 minutes ago, john g. said:

Truly beautiful, jeremy! I am all in favour of protecting minority languages! And Welsh  is gorgeous.

 

John, in 2030, when the Germans come after us wearing grass skirts and spears we'll be in our compound waiting and then I'll rise above the sandbags let fly with this:

 

 

 

 

 

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27 minutes ago, Mackle said:

 

But it's been said on here that American spouses are exempt from language requirements,

 

You just shouldn't believe everything that's said. 

 

"Niederlassungserlaubnis für Familienangehörige von Deutschen

(...)

 

Ausreichende Deutschkenntnisse 

 

Sie müssen ausreichende deutsche Sprachkenntnisse (Niveau B 1 des Gemeinsamen Europäischen Referenzrahmens für Sprachen) besitzen."
 

 

Quote

 

and also, doesn't 911 connect to the emergency services when in Hessen? I don't think 999 works here either! :P

 

Neither 112 nor 911 are direct numbers, but a GSM function. This function is preferred and routed to the nearest emergency call point depending on the network and location. 

 

The emergency call function of some mobile phones is linked not only with the European 112, but also with the USA emergency call number 911 and also with other country emergency call numbers - so the mobile can be sold on all markets. This does not apply however to all mobile phones and it's up to the manufacturer, not the government. 

 

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2 hours ago, hooperski said:

Now that isn't xenophobia, it is banter, verging on humour. B)

Pretty good humour, in fact!

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2 hours ago, john g. said:

Just imagine Theresa going to Brussels and saying : " ok, this is my deal. You have at least B1 skills in Welsh or bugger off.."

That would be fun...

;)

Over to you, hoops!

 

"i fyny'ch un chi", she said.

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2 hours ago, AlexTr said:

No, we aren't. I am the American spouse of a German national and I needed B1 for a permanent residence card.

 

I am also in your shoes but came long ago and never needed B1.

 

2 hours ago, swimmer said:

Not one Briton is in Germany is on any sort of family or spouse or employed or obligation basis.

 

Interesting. What about post Brexit for Britons married to Germans?

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10 hours ago, schmemley said:

Guys this isn't about who NEEDS to speak eachothers' country language. It is about RECIPROCITY. Good or bad. 

 

So much noise has been made from both sides about reciprocating. Deal or no deal. Yet here we are, just another inconsistency (this time it is Germany not reciprocating no fee / no language requirement, but it could equally be the UK not reciprocating some other aspect)

13 hours ago, schmemley said:

I'm not saying this is Germany's fault. I'm just highlighting the differences.

 

All EU citizens in UK who arrived before brexit only need to apply for settled status via the purpose-built app. Deal or no deal, they don't have to pay an application fee, and they don't have to meet a language requirement. EU newcomers to UK after brexit will not be allowed that privillege and won't be using that app.

 

I get that, but Germany can't make an exception for Brits. Once Brits become non-EU then they are going to have to follow the same rules as all other non-EU, it's only fair. Just because the UK dropped this fee at the last minute doesn't mean Germany could or should suddenly do the same. If nothing else, like dj_jay_smith said, the UK has loads of EU citizens. It's in their interests to try and keep the status quo as they couldn't handle the admin all at once, and they need EU citizens to stay and continue their jobs. The 100,000 of us here in Germany can simply be smoothly moved over to the non-EU category with little fuss. They'll give us a bit of breathing space to get things done in time but I really don't think they owe us more than that.

 

I know there was plenty of talk of "RECIPROCITY" but that doesn't mean Germany having to shadow every u-turn Britain makes along the way. Anyhow, this is what the deal is for. This is what a transition period is for. It's the UK not accepting any deal that is causing the uncertainty. What more could you expect the Germans to do in this situation? Serious question.

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