Germany - all-Laender brexit advice for resident Brits

120 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, RenegadeFurther said:

I went to the Auslanderbehorde a few weeks ago and the feeling I got was also a very cold one.

 

That must of been a bundle of fun, the Beamter must of got really pissed off having to try and communicate using hand signals, when did you feel the response was cold when the Beamter pointed to the door?

 

You must learn German RF.

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11 minutes ago, dj_jay_smith said:

 

 

Then he only needs to be here 2 years (married 3) to get citizenship.  MUCH easier than what most people have.

 

 

Why would he need citizenship? Couldn't he just be a non EU person married to a German like me and others?

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He doesn't need citizenship. But by the time you have farted about meeting all the requirements for the paperwork for a residence permit you may as well apply for citizenship.

Do you have a residence permit fruity?

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13 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

 

Why would he need citizenship? Couldn't he just be a non EU person married to a German like me and others?

 

 

Of course citizenship is not needed, I am a non-EU living here for very long time and I never took German citizenship because I would have to quit my own citizenship.   But we can't deny that having DE citizenship would make us feel safer and I would take it immediately if they accepted dual citizenship, like they to with other EU countries.

 

But we can discard RefugeeFurther taking German citizenship, it is not only about his lack of German language skills, now I remember he is very anti- dual citizenship.  Or maybe it only applies to brown people.

 

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Depending on how long you've lived and worked here you can apply for a permanent residence permit, then you don't have to bother with the authorities anymore. That's how it used to be for me when there was no EU. My daughter-in-law from the Philippines after 3 years of marriage has applied and been accepted. 

Edit: Though, wait, she did have to do an integration and language course when she came here.

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2 minutes ago, Krieg said:

But we can't discard RefugeeFurther taking German citizenship, it is not only about his lack of German language skills, now I remember he is very anti- dual citizenship.  Or maybe it only applies to brown people.

 

This is a textbook example of Muhammad not understanding his position relative to the mountain.

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1 hour ago, bramble said:

 My daughter-in-law from the Philippines after 3 years of marriage has applied and been accepted. 

Edit: Though, wait, she did have to do an integration and language course when she came here.

 

Was she allowed to take any job she wanted, or even any job at all, in that time?   The first is disappearing for us when no longer EU but, when I did the integration course, the newly arrived spouses on marriage visas were not allowed to work in any job.  Never mind in the profession they had been doing for 20 years in their home nation, or one they felt like taking up or whatever.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, swimmer said:

 

Was she allowed to take any job she wanted, or even any job at all, in that time?   The first is disappearing for us when no longer EU but, when I did the integration course, the newly arrived spouses on marriage visas were not allowed to work in any job.  Never mind in the profession they had been doing for 20 years in their home nation, or one they felt like taking up or whatever.

 

 

 

Yes, it says explicitely on her residence permit that she is allowed to work. She had a baby first, and now she is working a 450,00 Euro job since last June. 

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That is good because that always strikes me about the "marry your German" solution, the family rather than individual route just makes ir restrictive in other ways often.

 

Not being facetious but does she have to bother with the marriage :unsure:?  That also strikes me - what if it does not last?

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13 hours ago, Mackle said:

I received my letter from Frankfurt City last week.

 

The wording felt very cold. No mention of the 180 days, just that I would be summoned to the ABH in April and they would inform me if I was able to continue living in Germany.

 

If it's the same form letter that's doing the rounds over on FB, the link to get the forms to apply for a res perm in the meantime is here:

 

https://www.frankfurt.de/sixcms/detail.php?id=703665&_ffmpar[_id_inhalt]=58105

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Yes, I have seen it as well.  It is easy to say but I suppose it is just typical process (and of course still with the caveat of this being for no deal, only).  From your other posts, you sound like you have an ordered life here and will tick their boxes.   "No deal" process has begun here now really, with the authorities informing people of what has to be done - even if it later gets pulled if that is not the outcome at 29 March.

 

I know I for one am finding the relentless dragging to 29 March tedious and a bit stressful now, and that is as a person currently just slacking about.   At least having the outcome early in that 3 months will put an end to the uncertainty and set out the new residency clearly and someone like you then has that uncertainty gone and gets on with life here.

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8 minutes ago, swimmer said:

That is good because that always strikes me about the "marry your German" solution, the family rather than individual route just makes ir restrictive in other ways often.

 

A non-EU married to a German or having a German child who is studying has unrestricted access to the job market and welfare system.

 

Even a non-EU who is dependent from a non-EU with Blue Card will have as well unrestricted access to the job market.

 

As I said multiple times, the German immigration system is very open and fair.  

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1 hour ago, swimmer said:

Yes, I have seen it as well.  It is easy to say but I suppose it is just typical process (and of course still with the caveat of this being for no deal, only).  From your other posts, you sound like you have an ordered life here and will tick their boxes.   "No deal" process has begun here now really, with the authorities informing people of what has to be done - even if it later gets pulled if that is not the outcome at 29 March.

 

I know I for one am finding the relentless dragging to 29 March tedious and a bit stressful now, and that is as a person currently just slacking about.   At least having the outcome early in that 3 months will put an end to the uncertainty and set out the new residency clearly and someone like you then has that uncertainty gone and gets on with life here.

 

Hopefully you are right. I'm slightly fretting due to a combination of the tone of the letter and the required documentation listed at the top of the thread as I've never been in procession of my birth certificate, and I don't have any evidence of the GSCE's that I took 20 years ago.

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7 minutes ago, Mackle said:

 

Hopefully you are right. I'm slightly fretting due to a combination of the tone of the letter and the required documentation listed at the top of the thread as I've never been in procession of my birth certificate, and I don't have any evidence of the GSCE's that I took 20 years ago.

 

I would start thinking of having a back up plan.

 

The fact that the German Government have not guaranteed the rights of British citizens suggests that things are not looking good.

 

 

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I worked as freelance for a bit over 3 months in Munich last year , issuing invoice from UK address. I know I should have registered but I didn’t know if I wanted to stay here for longer and frankly a bit scared of the bureaucracy. It turned out I do enjoy living and working in Germany and there are some companies are interested in hiring me as freelance again. But I am not sure what kind of impact no deal Brexit will have for British nationals, as a third national,  is it easy to apply for residency permit if you have job offer? Can I register with temporary sub-let address? The sort of industry I am in usually offer short contract. 

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OK, I'm late with everything. Life's been extremely difficult. Was hospitalised 4 times last year, and now am officially registered as 70% "behindert".

 

I've applied online to register in Berlin, but am now too late to apply for citzenship whilst retaining British citizenship as well in the event of "No-Deal".

 

Basic question is this... IF  I apply for German citizenship and then have to give up UK citizenship, will I the lose my UK State Pension and a small private ("final salary") pension I'm receiving?

 

This is all I have in the way of income.

 

Thanks in advance.

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Sorry I have no advice, Keefy. I just wanted to say how sorry I am for all of your troubles and health issues. I hope things work out in your favor. 

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