Registration & healthcare HELP!

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I've lived in Germany for almost four years but have never registered as living here. I bought an old farm house with my German girlfriend, she works but I don't, I spend my time renovating the house and do not intend to work here. With Brexit looming closer I have no idea what is best to do. What are the advantages and disadvantages of becoming official here, I know I am supposed to register but was worried if I did I would have to start paying for some kind of health care here and have to give up my UK driving license. ANY advice, please?

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The UK DL is the least of your worries.

 

What if you have an accident or illness? Anything can happen where maybe an ambulance is called and of course their first question will be "Can we have your health card please?".

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4 years!  Wow, I wonder if that is a record (at least on here).

 

One thing is for sure is that you must register ASAP.  You are already effectively living here illegally, and after Brexit then controls on Brits will get tighter.

Yes you will need to have health insurance, you cannot legally live in Germany without this.  I don't know if maybe you can be included on your girlfriends health insurance (other can better advise perhaps), but there is no way to avoid cover.

 

I do however suggest that when you register that you don't reveal that you have been here already for 4 years.  Not only would you get a fine from the local Bürgeramt , but the health insurance will demand 4 years back payment!  

 

In regards to driving licence, then it is not totally clear what will happen after Brexit but it is probably best to exchange this now.  Afterwards it will at the very least be more hassle.

 

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All of the authorities and our support groups advise being properly registered at Brexit date 29 March, if we wish to be seen as residents after that date, and also to get "Citizens` Rights" if the withdrawal agreement is implemented.    The German authorities will then be giving Britons (who are not dual German / EU nationals) a three month period in which they will all have to go to an interview and have their status considered as third party nationals. So that is your first decision.  Will you be a registered Briton at Brexit date, or a third party national who can visit your g/f  (and local property) according to what all other  third party nationals can do?  If you want the former - and logically not everyone who has chosen to be a "visitor" for years will do - you need to be registered.     

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A good starting point would be to look in detail at the current guidance put out by both German and UK authorities.    I think the key thing is there will be none of this "flexibility" we have now under freedom of movement.   UK nationals will registered at Brexit date, and those with no other EU citizenship will be third party nationals with a specific basis of residency as the foreigners` office identifies, and of course the obligations round healthcare and such.  Or nothing to do with Germany.   Just another foreigner who might be able to visit.   Your choice.  Marriage of course increases options.  Unmarried people get few entitlements via their partner here on health and such. Don`t expect any.    

 

As to driving, nobody can force you to do anything with your UK driving licence.  If you want to keep it, then keep it.   Follow whatever process Germany decides people with UK licences have to do after Brexit if they wish to carry on driving here, given we will no longer have EU freedom.   (Note what Germany will ask of us is not yet clear).   Many Britons are choosing to switch the the German EU licence before 29 March (and of course that also requires registered address here) but that in turn may well result to barriers in driving in the UK.  Every active driver (I am a dormant one) needs to make their own choice.  Again, read the UK guidance carefully, perhaps?   That seems pretty clear on the situation with that.

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44 minutes ago, dj_jay_smith said:

4 years!  Wow, I wonder if that is a record (at least on here).

 

One thing is for sure is that you must register ASAP.  You are already effectively living here illegally, and after Brexit then controls on Brits will get tighter.

Yes you will need to have health insurance, you cannot legally live in Germany without this.  I don't know if maybe you can be included on your girlfriends health insurance (other can better advise perhaps), but there is no way to avoid cover.

 

I do however suggest that when you register that you don't reveal that you have been here already for 4 years.  Not only would you get a fine from the local Bürgeramt , but the health insurance will demand 4 years back payment!  

 

In regards to driving licence, then it is not totally clear what will happen after Brexit but it is probably best to exchange this now.  Afterwards it will at the very least be more hassle.

 

To be honest I've been away from the UK for 12 years, half year living in Portugal and the other half in Germany at the girlfriends parents until we bought the house and now live in Germany full time. I think I have to go and register, not so worried about the driving license, more about paying for health insurance. I guess it would be so expensive I would have to get a job instead of putting all my time into the house! Will look into the girlfriends health insurance. Of cause I wouldn't admit to living here full time and say I have been traveling back and forth. I don't own a uk address and use a friends as a care of. Thanks for any advice 👍🏼

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16 minutes ago, Daisick said:

 Will look into the girlfriends health insurance. 

 

Unfortunately, this is not an option for you, because the free family co-insurance (in a statutory health insurance) only applies to married couples and registered (same-sex) civil partnerships (and children), but not to friends. You have to be prepared for back payments. 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, swimmer said:

All of the authorities and our support groups advise being properly registered at Brexit date 29 March, if we wish to be seen as residents after that date, and also to get "Citizens` Rights" if the withdrawal agreement is implemented.    The German authorities will then be giving Britons (who are not dual German / EU nationals) a three month period in which they will all have to go to an interview and have their new third party national status status sorted.

 

That is your first decision.  Will you be a registered Briton at Brexit date, or a third party national who can visit your g/f according to what all other  third party nationals can do?  If the former, you need to be registered.

 

As to driving, nobody can force you to do anything with your UK driving licence.  If you want to keep it, then keep it.   Follow whatever process Germany decides people with UK licences have to do after Brexit if they wish to carry on driving here.   Many Britons are choosing to switch the the German EU licence before 29 March (and of course that also requires registered address here) but that in turn may well result to barriers in driving in the UK.  Every active driver (I am a dormant one) needs to make their own choice.

 

A good starting point would be to look in detail at the current guidance put out by both German and UK authorities.

Thanks for the reply, I think I must go and register. I could do without the hassle but either way I need to be covered with some kind of health cover as I 've been lucky so far at age 52 but who knows what can happen. 😩

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People can only bite the bullet now.   We cannot undo past decisions and choices, only accept the results ot them.  Our affairs need to be regularised as German residents by 29 March.   I do think it is that easy.    Any transition period under "deal" may allow Britons to continue to move here but even that ends in late 2020.

 

It is not only the matter of one`s health but also legality.   It is a requirement for all residents, and third party nationals (as UK nationals may well soon be if "no deal") have to show they have it.   

 

Another useful site in British in Europe and given current situ in particular the "No Deal Checklist".

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12 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

Unfortunately, this is not an option for you, because the free family co-insurance (in a statutory health insurance) only applies to married couples and registered (same-sex) civil partnerships (and children), but not to friends. You have to be prepared for back payments. 

 

 

Looks like a wedding is on the cards then, fancy an invite 😁😉

 

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2 hours ago, dj_jay_smith said:

I do however suggest that when you register that you don't reveal that you have been here already for 4 years.  Not only would you get a fine from the local Bürgeramt , but the health insurance will demand 4 years back payment!  

 

 

That sounds like a good idea.  Does he have to mention that he's been here for 4 years or can he simply register as if he's just arrived?

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1 hour ago, Daisick said:

Looks like a wedding is on the cards then, fancy an invite 😁😉

 

 

Your girlfriend will hopefully be happy, but that does not solve the problem that you have been without insurance for years. Every health insurance company will ask you about your previous insurance. 

 

Maybe you can contact one of the insurance experts here, @john g. or @Starshollow.

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57 minutes ago, Santitas said:

 

That sounds like a good idea.  Does he have to mention that he's been here for 4 years or can he simply register as if he's just arrived?

 

During the registration Daisick is asked for his previous address... This can all work - or not. 

 

Daisick doesn't have to present a landlord's confirmation (if the house was bought together with the girlfriend), but instead the "self-declaration of ownership".  If the registration office checks when the house was bought ... The chances that something like this will be checked are certainly greater in the country than in cities ... 

 

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2 hours ago, Daisick said:

Thanks for the reply, I think I must go and register. I could do without the hassle but either way I need to be covered with some kind of health cover as I 've been lucky so far at age 52 but who knows what can happen. 😩

 

Do you have a contact address in the UK?

 

At 52 you are too young to retire so how are you supporting yourself?

 

4 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

 

Daisick doesn't have to present a landlord's confirmation (if the house was bought together with the girlfriend), but instead the "self-declaration of ownership".  If the registration office checks when the house was bought ... The chances that something like this will be checked are certainly greater in the country than in cities ... 

 

 

Many people own property and live somewhere else.

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5 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

Many people own property and live somewhere else.

 

Yeah, nice. OP doesn't officially live anywhere. That is his problem now. 

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19 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

 

During the registration Daisick is asked for his previous address... This can all work - or not. 

 

Daisick doesn't have to present a landlord's confirmation (if the house was bought together with the girlfriend), but instead the "self-declaration of ownership".  If the registration office checks when the house was bought ... The chances that something like this will be checked are certainly greater in the country than in cities ... 

 

When I go to register I would explain that I bought the house but have been living in the uk for most of the time and traveling back and fore many times a year but now want to live permanently in Germany. Hope this would be ok?

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12 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

Yeah, nice. OP doesn't officially live anywhere. That is his problem now. 

True, I use a friends address in uk but am not on the electral register in Britain. I have to check how much basic health insurance will cost in Germany for a non smoking 52 year old with no health issues. Not even got a rough idea.

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yeah but you'll also have to provide evidence that you were insured somewhere in the EU *til now*

 

eta:  not to register, but to get health cover here.  and you NEED that to stay here legally

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24 minutes ago, RenegadeFurther said:

 

Do you have a contact address in the UK?

 

At 52 you are too young to retire so how are you supporting yourself?

 

 

Many people own property and live somewhere else.

I use a friends address in uk contact. I am lucky enough to have savings, the house is paid for so on the girlfriends wages it's no problem.

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1 hour ago, Santitas said:

 

That sounds like a good idea.  Does he have to mention that he's been here for 4 years or can he simply register as if he's just arrived?

I would register as if I have just decided to live permanently here.

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