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Ecological shops

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I am looking for any shops in the area of Düsseldorf where you can bring in, for instance, your empty laundry detergent bottle and refill it and shop for fruit and veg without being saddled with plastic. Or--and I seem to remember reading this somewhere--delivery services for your home and kitchen where they take back your plastics when they return with the next delivery (but I can't remember which company does this)?

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks & happy new year!

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You can buy loose fruit and veggies at a local outdoor market in D-Dorf (depending on the season) but also year round at chain grocery stores (NORMA; ALDI, REWE, LIDL) you can avoid plastic. Just bring your own cloth bag(s) or those old string bags, and empty your goods onto the checkout conveyor belt and then re-bag them to take them home.

 

I've never heard of a place where you can refill your launrdy detergent. Cool idea, though if you buy laundry powder detergent you can buy it in a small cardboard box which may or may not have a plastic handle or plastic scoop inside. This doesn't solve the refill issue but it can get you away from that plastic laundry detergent bottle. 

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I expect that single use plastic bags for fresh produce will be gone in a year or two.  Large number of people not using them now.  Rewe also now offer reusable ones, still polyester but it's a start, that obviously one can use at other stores too.   They also increasingly offer things like potatoes in paper packaging.    Alnatura, denns etc are obvious places to look for at least 100% recycled bottles etc for cleaning products (and those places of course do not expect us to bag fresh produce, it's normal just to put it on the checkout band).   I buy pretty randomly there with current examples including EcoClean and Sodasan.

 

I am no ecowarrier, but I would question why home delivery would be better.   A quick google indicates a typical vehicle will contains 350kg of plastic by 2020, and also that this is almost double of just a few years' ago :unsure:.  So using any vehicle is encouraging massively increased plastic consumption.  Then there's the use of fossil fuels, the pollutants pumped out and so on to get it to you.   Not sure there is a case for that as "better" really.  It's more displacement.   

 

The best solution - apart from walking or cycling to e.g. Alnatura and buying that 100% recycled bottle -  is probably to consider how to minimise detergent use.    And that is happening.   Fabric conditioner, a staple household consumer product for many people over about 40, is falling out of favour.   

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I buy laundry detergent powder that comes in a thin plastic bag.  It's not perfect, but a bit better than a bottle.  Even in the US where bulk goods are far more common, I don't ever recall seeing laundry detergent offered where you could fill your own container.  Body soap or lotion, yes, but not cleaning/laundry products.

 

I am not sure what the question is about plastic free produce - take a bag or don't, problem solved?  I usually don't use veg bags unless the item is wet (fresh herbs or so) or small multiples that need to be contained (cherry tomatoes).  Any I do take turn into garbage can liners once the veg is out.  And as cybil points out, I too see reusable veg bags for sale at Rewe and other markets.  Some places (Aldi is pretty notorious) offer a lot of product pre-packed in plastic trays with a bag around it, but most other markets I've been to offer the same items loose as well as bagged/boxed.

 

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Yes right, I think Aldi is getting a bit better in that things like tomatoes can now be bought loose, and so I use my Rewe bag there.   Also more things like carrots and potatoes can be bought loose at places like Rewe.   I always took that to be consumer-driven from another way though: the belated realisation of a huge market beyond those buying in bulk for a family.   Even many carrot-centric households must surely struggle with a kilo of the things, and potato fans (who include me) similarly with 2.5 kilos of potatoes :rolleyes:.   I don't think it's eco-driven.

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53 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

I don't ever recall seeing laundry detergent offered where you could fill your own container.

 

Not the US, but up in Richmond, N Yorkshire, we had a lovely shop called the Green Bag or something, where you could take your empty plastic bottle and fill it from a big drum with some eco-washing liquid or other, the Marke escapes me. Brilliant, really. That was 15 years ago or so, but the shop sadly went out of business after about 18 months.

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that's fab!

 

I always loved the bulk body care products as I could buy a small amount according to my budget at any given time.

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On Sonntag, 30. Dezember 2018, zwiebel said:

I am looking for any shops in the area of Düsseldorf where you can bring in, for instance, your empty laundry detergent bottle and refill it and shop for fruit and veg without being saddled with plastic.

 

FLinse & Co. – Düsseldorfs erster unverpackt-Laden

 

Unverpackt Düsseldorf | Startnext - crowdfunding project - most goals reached 2018 - should be trading 2019

 

3 hours ago, swimmer said:

I buy pretty randomly there with current examples including EcoClean and Sodasan.

 

 Sodasan : Nachfüllen statt wegwerfen - see >Bezugsquellen under >Das Unternehmen for retail distributors

 

They do manufacture a number of household cleaning liquids, detergents and soaps in refillable containers. Their English site dies mention it but I didn't see laundry soaps listed on the German one.

 

Sodasan international site > environmentally-protective-laundering-washing-cleaning - sodasan.com english

 

For TTers seeking ecological shops offering 'Unverpackt' or 'Minimal verpackt' solutions in any other locations in Germany, plus possibile sources of bulk laundry and other liquids, it'd be worthwhile scrolling through this 'Utopia' page as well as following other links on the site.

 

Verpackungsfreier Supermarkt: einkaufen ohne Verpackung

 

HTH

 

and

 

Happy New Year 2019, TTers!!

 

2B

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On 12/30/2018, 4:19:21, zwiebel said:

I am looking for any shops in the area of Düsseldorf where you can bring in, for instance, your empty laundry detergent bottle and refill it and shop for fruit and veg without being saddled with plastic. Or--and I seem to remember reading this somewhere--delivery services for your home and kitchen where they take back your plastics when they return with the next delivery (but I can't remember which company does this)?

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks & happy new year!

...delivery services for your home... Em not really ecological to be honest. 

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great links, 2B! 

 

just a tip regarding unverpackt shopping:  if you see even one moth in the shop, run.  The large, relatively open bins are a bit more prone to harboring grain moths and you don't want to take those home :/

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On 31/12/2018, 23:31:52, McDee said:

...delivery services for your home... Em not really ecological to be honest. 

That depends.  I am one person buying a load of goods for a home. I can't carry it all. It would be equally "non-ecological" if I were to pick it up in my non-existent car. Many people do use cars to do large shoppings of dry and household items. It ends up being more ecological if you think about it--one truck making stops in a geographical pattern for, say, 20 homes, as opposed to twenty different cars going to the shop to bring back items. 

I use delivery a few times a year to bring large and heavy items (ie. flours, pastas, grains, etc). I would physically not be able to do this without a car and as someone who works more than full-time, it saves me dozens of trips to shop that I physically cannot do.  

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22 hours ago, lisa13 said:

great links, 2B! 

 

just a tip regarding unverpackt shopping:  if you see even one moth in the shop, run.  The large, relatively open bins are a bit more prone to harboring grain moths and you don't want to take those home :/

Yes, good advice!  I know that those animals that get into rice are the end of your food stock.  :)

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2 hours ago, zwiebel said:

It ends up being more ecological if you think about it--one truck making stops in a geographical pattern for, say, 20 homes, as opposed to twenty different cars going to the shop to bring back items. 

 

The environmentally concerned don't have a car, of course, so the idea of driving one anywhere would be a false premise.     That's the point.  You'd deal with the use of vehicles before bothering about your soap bottle.  But 20 homes? 20 cars?  There are 80 million people in Germany.  More than 30 million homes, at least as many cars.    If you massive underestimate  a behaviour - to practically zero - of course it won't seem damaging.   Or is the rest of the population supposed to be virtuously trudging to the shops while their kids breathe in the toxins from these home deliveries of the 20 who get to ignore the impacts? 

 

A bad choice does not become good just because a worse choice has not been made.  It is still be damaging and best avoided.  "Just be grateful I don't..." is the classic rationalisation of that.

 

It's of course very easy to exclude one's personal life choices from being damaging.  People do that all the time with environmental impacts.    The mainstream middleclass obsession with plastic is clearly largely displacement in much the same way recycling is - giving up a few plastic bags is easy virtue signalling compared to choices about children, cars, home deliveries and generally pursuing the consumer dream.  Classic distractor. 

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On 12/31/2018, 7:41:48, cybil said:

I've never heard of a place where you can refill your launrdy detergent. Cool idea, though if you buy laundry powder detergent you can buy it in a small cardboard box which may or may not have a plastic handle or plastic scoop inside. This doesn't solve the refill issue but it can get you away from that plastic laundry detergent bottle. 


They used to be.  Around 1990 in Würzburg where I used to live, there was a bio shop.  Laundry and washing up soaps were available, but one needed to bring a bottle as they offered the soaps from large containers.  Also for müsli some type of container was needed. It was a very basic bio shop that I believe no longer exists.

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On 02/01/2019, 09:47:49, swimmer said:

 

The environmentally concerned don't have a car, of course, so the idea of driving one anywhere would be a false premise.     That's the point.  You'd deal with the use of vehicles before bothering about your soap bottle.  But 20 homes? 20 cars?  There are 80 million people in Germany.  More than 30 million homes, at least as many cars.    If you massive underestimate  a behaviour - to practically zero - of course it won't seem damaging.   Or is the rest of the population supposed to be virtuously trudging to the shops while their kids breathe in the toxins from these home deliveries of the 20 who get to ignore the impacts? 

 

A bad choice does not become good just because a worse choice has not been made.  It is still be damaging and best avoided.  "Just be grateful I don't..." is the classic rationalisation of that.

 

It's of course very easy to exclude one's personal life choices from being damaging.  People do that all the time with environmental impacts.    The mainstream middleclass obsession with plastic is clearly largely displacement in much the same way recycling is - giving up a few plastic bags is easy virtue signalling compared to choices about children, cars, home deliveries and generally pursuing the consumer dream.  Classic distractor. 

You have a poor understanding of ecology and sound might pure with your preachiness. First some facts: deliveries made to 50 clients in the same neighbourhood saves on the carbon footprint. Instead of fifty people making a trip to haul back large volumes of food, one truck does it locally. This is mathematically better.  
Nobody is suggesting 80m people do this daily. I am speaking of large quantities a few times a year. Many Germans drive to the store several times a week. You do the math again.

"virtuously trudging to the shops while their kids breathe in the toxins from these home deliveries of the 20 who get to ignore the impacts"--uh, check your post for virtuous. Trucks are carrying loads of crap that you and others buy while we breath in the toxins. I guess it's just your choice what you get to do to damage the earth and what you can judge of others , right?  Get off your high horse, dude.  You are on a computer. I could write you an article about the amount of environmental damage and human rights violations you are involved in buy owning a computer, but I won't.  And yeah, it's a personal life choice after all.  

But let's not get facts in the way of your conspiracy hate-athon (not that you care about facts). But the most ecological form of home deliveries are for those of groceries since they have a next to nil rate of return and home deliveries in most recent studies are shown to be good--not bad--for the environmental impact. I suppose you troll people getting veg boxes.  The studies show that deliveries are just more ecological hands down. Now you can do more purity posturing here and claim that you NEVER use a car, but that would be lie. And we know this how? Again, your computer, your food that you self-flagellatingly purchase as you walk barefoot to the shop in the middle of a snow storm naked, was brought in by transport powered by fossil fuels, and so forth.  But then, I suspect you just let your wife do all the dirty work and you sit back and tell your friends how green you are as she hauls up fifty kilos of rice, lentils, vegan sausage and tofu up the stairs every week or two. 

It is exhausting to read your words. I wonder how you live with yourself oh purest of all.

https://www.conservationmagazine.org/2013/09/how-green-is-grocery-delivery/

http://www.alanmckinnon.co.uk/uploaded/PDFs/Papers/Online%20-%20conventional%20retailing%20comparison%20(LTF%20article%20July%202009).pdf

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During me midday break, I took a wee walk as near each day. A new shop is opening here in Immenstadt - a packageless grocer. Been a donkey's age since I've seen such. One must bring their own container. I imagine laundry and washing up soaps will be amongst the offers.

 

How this will fair in Immenstadt I can't say. We have roughly 15k citizens and loads of tourists. I hope it succeeds, but am a wee doubtful.

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