Brexit- what British Berliners need to do next

11 posts in this topic

Last night the British Embassy held an information evening on UK citizens' rights in Germany post Brexit.

 

The event was filmed and will be posted on their website; it's worth watching because it gives strong indications of how Germany would plan to deal with us, in the case of Deal_Brexit and No_Deal_Brexit. The German speakers were pretty reassuring tbh.

https://www.gov.uk/world/organisations/british-embassy-berlin

 

However the Berlin Ausländerbehörde stated that they already have plans to try and process the 18,000 British in Berlin: in the first week of January they will post a link on their website, in both English and German.

We are to register there and (IIRC) we can download and print a document which confirms our right to reside and move freely in Germany (and presumably by default Schengen area?).

The document ~might~ help at passport control coming back from the UK but it's not a recognized legal document in that scenario.

https://www.berlin.de/labo/willkommen-in-berlin/?fbclid=IwAR01_L8rtgC0oAo0XRWnvJ5zv41bm3S36PEYRo0SLPdTTzPDxgOWGZ-1MtQ

 

But it's best if you check this out for yourselves as this is only my understanding of things. (and it was after work and there was no food and I was tired :D)

 

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5 minutes ago, Tibia said:

We are to register there and (IIRC) we can download and print a document which confirms our right to reside and move freely in Germany (and presumably by default Schengen area?) during the transition period.

 

What transition period?

 

(I like the events but they do tend to focus on what's not yet a reality :ph34r:).

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1 minute ago, swimmer said:

 

What transition period?

 

While new laws are made.

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Well, they were talking a lot about a potential transition period which would run out at end of Dec 2020. 

They were also indicating that if you applied for citizenship up to that date, the option for dual citizenship might be honoured.

 

It was a lot of ifs and buts and maybes.

 

 

 

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This is interesting from the articles I have read.

 

"Third country nationals who have been legal residents in one Member State for a period of five years must be granted, subject to certain conditions, longterm resident status in that Member State in accordance with Union rules."

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That might be where the reference to five years for citizenship application came from, because I understood it to be 8 years' residency requirement but 5 years was mentioned a few times.

 

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1 minute ago, Nerdbloke said:

This is interesting from the articles I have read.

 

"Third country nationals who have been legal residents in one Member State for a period of five years must be granted, subject to certain conditions, longterm resident status in that Member State in accordance with Union rules."

 

This is basically the conditions for non-EUs to get NE.  If like that they will be recognizing the time living as a UK citizen to count towards the NE.

1 minute ago, Tibia said:

That might be where the reference to five years for citizenship application came from, because I understood it to be 8 years' residency requirement but 5 years was mentioned a few times.

 

 

For non-EUs:

 

8 years = citizenship

5 years = NE

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Quote

"Third country nationals who have been legal residents in one Member State for a period of five years must be granted, subject to certain conditions, longterm resident status in that Member State in accordance with Union rules."

 

100% true :D.   The UK government's information evenings have been strongly advising us (if not German now) to obtain a permanent residency document if we are entitled to one.  That entitlement vests anyway (i.e. we do not need to prove it) but they also note we may also need it to prove our entitlement to citizens's rights, according to process adopted here.  That right's process does fly a bit under radar.

 

It costs 10 Euro and is an entitlement if we have met what you say.  Not something like citizenship they we apply for any get evaluated on.

 

Some of the other Brexit threads here contain a lot more information about it.   We've discussed it a lot.

 

(EDIT - Yes, that's the five years referred to, not related to citizenship).

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7 minutes ago, Tibia said:

 

They were also indicating that if you applied for citizenship up to that date, the option for dual citizenship might be honoured.

 

As just discussed on the main Brexit thread, the German draft law for "no deal" will allow citizenship application process made by 29 March 2019 to continue without giving one up.

 

The draft law for any transition period allows that and also for any new applications in that transition period to keep both.   Again, also discussed at length on the main Brexit threads.

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Oh I'm sure it's been discussed a lot.

I've removed the words "transition period" because now the thread is all about that which wasn't the point.

 

I just wanted to update on the issue with the Ausländerbehörde as that seemed to be fresh news. But if you already knew all this, then I can remove the thread?

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18 minutes ago, Krieg said:

 

While new laws are made.

 

Germany has drafted laws for us covering both a transition period with the EU and no deal.   As one affected, not aware there will be any more "new laws" for us.   Germany is done. Got it covered.   They just have to be put on statute as we have been ensured they will be, according to requirement. Everything is out there to read too of course.

 

As it stands, the UK leaves the EU on 29 March with no deal. End.  No transition period for any purpose, new laws or otherwise.   The new law for that outcome has already been drafted and approved by the German cabinet.  So has the one for any transition period.

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