Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Risk Aversion

71 posts in this topic

28 minutes ago, Krieg said:

You, like many people, are probably making the mistake of thinking that all startups are IT startups.  And that the startup has to revolutionize the world in order to be successful.

 

Green.     

 

As far as I have read, Germany has some really innovative companies in the area broadly referred to as "Materials" as one example.  

 

Not a topic which will make someone the focus of attention at a cocktail party. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah...the reviews for Tesla on glassdoor tell a slightly more realistic story.

 

I see this as part of the fan-boy/girl (not really, they have problems employing women from what I have heard) thing...heavily connected to the work=>ego thing.  

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/15/2018, 5:35:54, kapokanadensis said:

Also browsing the Arbeitsagentur website for job seekers, as I'm looking to hire soon.  What stands out is that every seeker has specified that they are looking for a position without responsibility, not in a leadership position.  Some of these people have bigger qualifications than I do.

 

 

 

Apart from what other people said already, another important factor is that in big companies normal workers have normally more rights therefore more stability than managers.   A normal employee in a big company would most probably have a unionized contract so getting rid of such employee is not as easy, specially if there are plenty of people doing a similar job.   Managers are easier to get rid of and specially high management can be disposed and it is even expected that you do not complain back when you are sacked.

 

In IT which is what I know the most, middle management only make a few thousand more than experienced normal workers, so plenty of people see it as not worthy doing a "career".

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/15/2018, 9:04:07, Petro6golf said:

I feel like most Germans are happy with their lot in life, working 9-5 and being done at the end of the day. There is little incentive to manager anything because the pay is not considerably better. 

 

Ive been nagging my wife to buy apartments and rent them out and retire early. Its not rocket science but does take work and is a little risky. She said she doesnt want the stress and would put all our money in a matress if she could. 

 

Working in a buro in a shitty job you hate till you are 65 is way more stressful than taking the risk of buying some realestate. 

I guess that's what you get for marrying a German. But you're right and it seems that Germans have everything planned out and anything extra is "stressful".

 

This type of mentality leads to mediocrity and a lack of motivation which is why I see so many Germans staying in the same job that they hate for 20 years. What's worse is that I've seen how it's affected some of my Canadian and American friends who used to be quite motivated and are now slackers.

 

I've stayed here for far too long and will be leaving to Singapore by the end of the year.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Svetlana.Petro said:

I guess that's what you get for marrying a German. But you're right and it seems that Germans have everything planned out and anything extra is "stressful".

 

This type of mentality leads to mediocrity and a lack of motivation which is why I see so many Germans staying in the same job that they hate for 20 years. What's worse is that I've seen how it's affected some of my Canadian and American friends who used to be quite motivated and are now slackers.

 

I've stayed here for far too long and will be leaving to Singapore by the end of the year.

 

I am not sure I could have said it any better myself. Even my young students are like this. There are a multitude of reasons for this but the one I keep coming back to is that German people expect to be 'taken care of' (subconsciously) as in supported by the state through means such as Hertz IV, Elterngeld, Pensions etc. Is that to say that these things are bad? No, and as a tax payer of five years and someone now in Elternzeit I think these benefits are earned. -BUT- knowing that you always have something to fall back on does not inspire the same  'pull yourself up by the bootstraps' attitude like I grew up with. It does not inspire inovation or independence in many people. The school system in my state is not helping this at all... .

 

My first three years in Germany I was in a miserable job with miserable, snappy, sad people. I got out as soon as I could but I am shocked by how many of these unfortunate souls would rather just work for a company that hates them for seemingly ever than better their lot in life.

 

I have often found that many people snicker or question when I mention that many American adults go back to school to learn a new skill or trade past traditional school age. I would like to do this too because why the hell not and I get a lot of strange reactions (...and I am 35 with a MA.)

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NativeFraulein said:

I got out as soon as I could but I am shocked by how many of these unfortunate souls would rather just work for a company that hates them for seemingly ever than better their lot in life.

 

Depends on your situation & who is dependent on you.

 

Once I reached 55 my Rechtsanwalt pal from the flying club (I've known him longer than I've known my wife) said something along the lines of "even if you don't like that job any more - sit tight for as long as possible as every month adds to your pension".  This on the grounds that I would be unlikely to find another paying job at that age.

 

As it turned out I just made it - I would have been put on "Garden Leave" one month after I reached normal retirement age as were all my service colleagues in Germany (the UK followed a few months later).  All to be replaced by cheaper newbies in Bucharest with 6 months experience.  BTW the company was a global IT player with headquarters in California...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The past near on two months since signing the contract and renovating has been illuminating.  Most in regards to others I've been talking with.  I can only say how it is here in the  Oberallgäu.  While I have lived in this country for near on 31 years, I suppose I was a rather ignorant consumer not really paying attention.

When researching for my business plan, I was rather surprised at what we have here in regards to small businesses.  Immenstadt is, in my opinion, unique.  This town, where I have called home for the past 8 years is odd.  A town of roughly 16000, to which Oberstdorf is 20 minutes south, Kempten is 20 minutes north and Oberstaufen is 20 minutes west.  All are tourist magnets.  Immenstadt not so much.  But they do come and I cannot figure why.  We have one clothing shop here for men that is extremely upscale.  All suits are tailored only.  Shirts start at 250€ and ties at 150€.  While the owner mostly sells Italian belts, he sends his patrons to me for custom made belts - business belts, mind.  Who are the majority of his customers?  The Swiss. 

All of the shops in this small town center are locally owned, short of Müller, a TEDI and a NKD (across from the bloody Schloß!)  We only have three small hotels.  These shops are mostly higher end than I initially thought.  And they thrive. 

My carpenter, who I've known for about 6 years now, has a booming business.  I have a mate who is a blacksmith and stays very busy.  I've grown to know a pottery maker here who struggles to stay atop her orders and keep her shelves stocked.  Is it fair to include tattoo artists?  They too are very busy.  The one I frequent and we have become close over the years.  It takes me 6 months to get an appointment with her!  My first took a year!

All of the shops here are doing very well.  Surprisingly well.  We have two second-hand clothing shops that do brilliantly as well.  I feel mostly because when one enters, they don't feel they're in a second-hand shop.  It's nicely decorated.

We are still renovating me shop, so I can't say who my customers are.  After 01.03, I'll have a better idea, but for about a month, I did have items in the show window and people did come in for a chat and a few orders did occur in January.  All were locals.  But it does seem that small businesses do well in this country despite little to no help from the government.

In the coming July, we'll have Jahrmarkt der Träume, which is every other year.  An estimated 10000 people invade our small town over a weekend.  In August is the Allgäuer Festwoche in Kempten and I'll have a stand in the Hirschbräuzelt.  These two events should boost my exposure. 

One thing I have noticed that is worth mentioning is the support the other small businesses give each other.  That alone has been amasing.

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree HEM. Now that I have a baby daughter to consider I would consider all options before leaving a job. I am actually a very loyal, considerate employee so I can imagine staying at my current employer for a long time. As for the first job...well people were so mean spirited and miserable that by the end I realized that certain birds do flock together.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/9/2019, 2:32:34, NativeFraulein said:

 

 

My first three years in Germany I was in a miserable job with miserable, snappy, sad people. I got out as soon as I could but I am shocked by how many of these unfortunate souls would rather just work for a company that hates them for seemingly ever than better their lot in life.

 

I have often found that many people snicker or question when I mention that many American adults go back to school to learn a new skill or trade past traditional school age. I would like to do this too because why the hell not and I get a lot of strange reactions (...and I am 35 with a MA.)

I had the same type of miserable job at first but it lasted less than a year and I used it as a stepping stone to get to investment banking. If you're unhappy with your job change it, is the lesson they need to learn. Just out of curiosity are you American?

 

On 2/9/2019, 5:13:21, NativeFraulein said:

I agree HEM. Now that I have a baby daughter to consider I would consider all options before leaving a job. I am actually a very loyal, considerate employee so I can imagine staying at my current employer for a long time. As for the first job...well people were so mean spirited and miserable that by the end I realized that certain birds do flock together.

This was also my dilemma. I'm still in Elternzeit and leaving anyway. Ultimately I decided to continue working at least part time but I can't go to my old position since you can't work part time as a VP.

 

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12.2.2019, 14:22:39, Svetlana.Petro said:

I had the same type of miserable job at first but it lasted less than a year and I used it as a stepping stone to get to investment banking. If you're unhappy with your job change it, is the lesson they need to learn. Just out of curiosity are you American?

 

This was also my dilemma. I'm still in Elternzeit and leaving anyway. Ultimately I decided to continue working at least part time but I can't go to my old position since you can't work part time as a VP.

 

 

 

 

Yes I am American. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0