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A rant about life in Frankfurt

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I am just waiting for the catfight between Mickey and Willy (now that I have realised that they are both female with male names) - I am sure I could sell a load of tickets. ;)

 

From Radio 1's site.

"Homelessness can affect anyone. It can hit families and single people alike, young or old, men or women. People lose their homes for a wide range of reasons: falling out with their family, suffering from domestic violence or being evicted by their landlord to name but a few. In 2000, Shelter estimates that over 410,000 people were found to be homeless by local authorities in England alone."

 

Is it a surprise that some of these people turn to drugs (when they have no hope for the future left)?

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This is probably going to be incredibly unclear, but I seem to remember reading about a year ago that the number of homeless in London had been remarkably cut down to a couple dozen. This was done by offering decent shelters and by having people literally go out an pick people off the streets. People couldn't be forced into a shelter, but they would be pestered enough that most eventually gave in, and then with better shelter space they were more willing to stay. Once people were then better accounted for more intensive addiction programs and job searches could begin.

 

Am I only imagining this, or can anyone else confirm it?

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Here's a more recent article on the beeb:

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4237626.stm

 

"There are now an estimated 459 rough sleepers, according to the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister figures. This is a fall of 75% from 1,850 since 1998."

 

Figures are from England...and from the government. Realistic? And how were these figures compiled? Did they walk around ALL the streets of a major city? :unsure:

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Did they walk around ALL the streets of a major city? 

Yes, at least that is how non-profit groups in the US do it.

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Loads of people have hard lives, most just get on with it and try to do the best they can. Some just scrounge and blame everyone else but themselves.

 

I saw a documentary on BBC2 the other day (I think it was called "Real Lives") where they followed a drug addict. She came out of prison (10 months of a 2 year sentnce) apparently clean. But rather than go to see here 6 year-old son, she went straight to a friend who was a crack dealer. The next day she visited her son, stayed with him for an hour then had to go back to her flat because she was tagged and couldn't break her curfew. Within two weeks she was back on drugs and had broken her curfew and gone on the run.

 

These are people who have the ability to make the sensible decision and refuse to, time and time again And I'm supposed to stump up the money to keep them idle (by way of taxes) and then I'm supposed to feel sorry for them because they're victims of society. Quite frankly it makes me feel good to see them shivering with cold lying in the gutter, at least I know I'm not paying for them to lounge around in some soup kitchen or hotel at my expense.

 

Jean-Pierre

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Could have been a disgruntled customer, I don't know! needless to say my appetite vanished.

 

LOL! Gives new meaning to the term "making a deposit".

:D a little humour never hurt!

 

During the summer I was back home and the Toronto Star ran several articles on the problems of the hidden homelessness. In one particular situation one middle class family wound up in a shelter for several months, that in spite of having a full time job. He lost his $20 an hour job, got a new one at $10 an hour and then the wife got sick. After a while they couldn't afford the 1300 a month rent and got kicked out. After living in the shelter for a month they were able to find more reasonable accommodations. they told the kids they were on holidays to explain why they weren't at home.

 

I read somewhere that most families are all but 1 or 2 pay cheques away from being homeless.

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from the Economist

 

 

Giving has been deterred through propaganda campaigns, which aim to persuade the soft-hearted that most beggars will use the money to buy drugs,

I asked my Bro in Law about that, if I should I give some spare change to them and he said he never gives cash, only coupons for lunch (and most refuse it). He runs an outreach for the homeless in Kitchener Waterloo. As said above most of it is for drugs or booze.

 

Sometimes I give money to musicians

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For once I agree with Jean-Pierre! :o

 

 

I read somewhere that most families are all but 1 or 2 pay cheques away from being homeless.

Well I can well believe that. I mean, just how many people are living from pay cheque to pay cheque with a pile of debts and a mortgage? It must be frightening. I couldn't sleep at night if I were in that position! :wacko:

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I agree with JP too.

I got a brother that is a junkie. And no..he didn´t come from a bad home, rather the oposite. My Mum did everything for him and nearly ruined her marriage because of him. He was a waste of space from the word go. He turned to drugs at the age of 16 but before hand he started to shoplift, break into houses or stole from my Mum. He landed in prision at one point for 13 month because he had stolen a couple of my stepdad´s cheques and cashed them in. It came to a point that my Mum found a flat for him, furnished it and also financially supported him. But he still kept stealing from my Mum, sister and my Stepdad. He had so many chances to get cleaned up again but he never lasted very long. He went on National TV and slaged my Mum off. My Mum got him to the Doctors and they gave him Methadone (not sure of the spelling). Proudly she anounced that my brother was doing well and was slowly coming of drugs...little did she know..he was also injecting. He thought is was funny when he told me about it...I was disgusted by him.

He didn´t give a shit about any of us...he lied and decieved us...anything to get some cash to feed his habbit.

My Mum died 3 years ago of cancer, my brother didn´t once show face in the hospital but turned up at the house less then an hour of my Mums death. He demanded his share of my Mums jewelery...the piece of shit...to shoot it up his arm.

Junkies dont care about anybody but themselfs. Thing is...no matter what the reason was that they turned to drugs in the first place...they only see themselfs and in my eyes they are a waste of space.

There are many help programms for them and they take part...mostly because if they hit a dead end for cash, they know that they be given a replacement drug, free of charge and that ties them over for a while.

 

Have you ever seen the film : "Christiane F. Wir Kinder vom Bahnhofs Zoo". It was made in the early 80´s but still a very good film.

Christiane F. directed this film...it was about her own life. At the end of the film she had moved away from Berlin and was "Clean". She died a few years later of a Drug overdose. ^_^

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Classic example from one of our outworkers who relies on a DSL connection in order to do her job. Hubby, a low-qualified type who has been unemployed for ages, manages to get a Praktikumsplatz with the added carrot of a job at the end, the other side of town. They decide to move nearer to the Firm to save travel costs and hope to get a Kindergarten place for their 3 year old twins. They move to an area without DSL. Hubby doesn't get the job, in fact, he doesn't even finish his Praktikum. She sits at home working, downloading/uploading stuff via ISDN, gets landed with a telephone bill for nearly €150 which they can't pay. The Telekom duly cuts off the phone. Now she can't work either.

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Any addiction is selfish, whether it's smoking, drinking or drugs. My son's schoolclass was taken to a Drug Therapy Centre in Hannover and the guy hosting the visit was an ex-junkie. He emphasised over and over again not to even stark smoking, because for a lot of junkies, that's where the "career" began.

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These are people who have the ability to make the sensible decision and refuse to

When you're addicted to something, you can't make sensible decisions. It's an illness. Mostly you need help and support to overcome your addiction.

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It's an illness.

It's not an illness. If it were, it would be the only illness in the world that you can cure just by deciding to cure yourself. It's that kind of bleeding-heart liberalism that gives junkies the perfect excuse for their selfishness. In life you should take responsibility for your own actions. I'm not against giving people a helping hand. But if they take advantage of that helping hand it should very quickly turn into a fist and knock their bloody teeth out.

 

Jean-Pierre

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"Drug addiction is a complex illness. It is characterized by compulsive, at times uncontrollable drug craving, seeking, and use that persist even in the face of extremely negative consequences. For many people, drug addiction becomes chronic, with relapses possible even after long periods of abstinence.

 

The path to drug addiction begins with the act of taking drugs. Over time, a person's ability to choose not to take drugs can be compromised. Drug seeking becomes compulsive, in large part as a result of the effects of prolonged drug use on brain functioning and, thus, on behavior"

 

NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse)

 

Read more from source article.

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I suppose whether one considers it an "illness" depends on how you define the term. Personally I think that labelling addiction an "illness" gives people an excuse to do nothing about it because it is somehow out of their personal control, like cancer or arthritis, when exactly the opposite is true. The only person who can get an addict to give up is the person themselves. Making the addiction more tolerable/comfortable for the addict does them no favours, it merely reduces the need for them to come off and prolongs the torment.

 

Jean-Pierre

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To say it's within the addict's personal control to give up the addiction, is a simplification of the problem. Although some strong-minded people have simply given up their addiction, I suspect the majority need some kind of treatment to solve their problem.

 

In order to treat the addiction you have to understand it.

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I suppose whether one considers it an "illness" depends on how you define the term. Personally...
John-Pierre - I totally agree with you. An illness is a disease you catch or a degenerative condition/Cancer/MS etc.
It's an illness. Mostly you need help and support to overcome your addiction.

An addiction is a personal problem, not an illness. Many people do manage to overcome addictions, with as stated, help & support. What's next - greed, poverty, laziness being called illnesses - to be "cured"?

 

if it's laziness, then boy am I seriously ill! :wacko:

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