A permanent solution to prevent pregnancy - Berlin

72 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, dessa_dangerous said:

Sorry to bang on about it but I always enthusiastically seize any opportunity to extol upon the virtues of condoms...So good, clean, cheap, uncomplicated, and effective; as close to perfect as any method is going to get.  I recommend them for everybody!

 

But Dessa the vast majority sold which are made from some form of latex are not environmentally friendly.

 

11 hours ago, KateNatalieB said:

On top of that, there are environmental reasons

 

 If it's the environment you're thinking of there's always this option.

 

5c05b4a43cc07_lambskin.jpg.0cffde71e3f11

 

As the name would suggest, lambskin condoms are made from an all natural material but it’s not skin. Instead, they’re made from the intestines of sheep.

As I understand, they’re the only type of condom that’s actually biodegradable, although I wouldn’t recommend throwing them on your compost heep or disposing of them in the Biotonne.

 

The only issue here would be if the op was a Vegan.

 

 

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unfortunately they do not offer STD protection on par with synthetic materials

 

outside of a very committed pairing I'd not rely on these

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10 hours ago, Sir Percy B said:

 

5c05b4a43cc07_lambskin.jpg.0cffde71e3f11

 

As the name would suggest, lambskin condoms are made from an all natural material but it’s not skin. Instead, they’re made from the intestines of sheep.

As I understand, they’re the only type of condom that’s actually biodegradable, although I wouldn’t recommend throwing them on your compost heep or disposing of them in the Biotonne.

 

The only issue here would be if the op was a Vegan.

 

 

Naturalamb are also not quite effective:

 

Quote

With perfect use, lambskin condoms are 98 percent effective, and they are 82 percent effective with typical use.

 

And they don't protect from most STDs (including HIV)

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17 hours ago, lisa13 said:

...a proper evaluation of WHY your current IUD is hurting you...

 

First thing they (should) do is measure you up as I remember... if she is young and unstretched by pregnancy Sherlock is wondering if the thing is simply too big... if it is that simple I would be inclined to risk a second shot.

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On 12/3/2018, 2:38:58, KateNatalieB said:

Haha really? I heard it is rather easy for guys as it is reversible.

To reverse mine I would need a brain transplant first. Only time I have had regrets is in relationships where a month later realised it had saved me. 

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My doctor told me there was a possibility of the ovaries being affected by the tube being cut, and early menopause could result. Google side effects of femaile sterilisation. There is no satisfactory solution to fertility.

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Sterilization in your 20s, for females and males is maybe too permanent a choice.

 

My ex-husband had a vasectomy at 22 but when he re-married, they wanted kids. He had a reverse vasectomy at 32 or so, adopted one child after thinking the surgery was a failure, only to find his new wife was indeed pregnant so they have an adopted child now and one of their own too!

 

My sisters and  I never wanted kids. I always thought I'd be a great aunt type though. That's not happeneing with us all still childfree at Ü-50. I decided to have my tubes tied in my mid-30s (clips option). My now husband is happy about that. He never wanted to have kids either!

 

I haven't regretted being sterilized but I must say,  when you choose to not have kids you are in for being asked 'why not?' the rest of your life it seems. Do men get asked this when they choose not to have kids? 

 

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6 hours ago, cybil said:

Do men get asked this when they choose not to have kids? 

 

Yes. They also get asked why they never married. Some people even assume they are gay. 

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On 3.12.2018, 19:00:36, KateNatalieB said:

I am 100 % certain I do not want to and I will not ever give birth to a child

I know that my comment isn´t what you want to hear, so please accept my apologies. I was of the same thinking as you (or similiar as I´m male) aand never wanted to have kids but rather follow my carrier. My first marriage failed because of this. All that changed fiercly and instantly when I, aged 38 at the time, held my newborn daughter in my arms (as you might suspect she wasn´t planned). Today I´m grateful for having my kids and I´m glad that the urologist I had consulted refused to do a vasectomy on me. My point is that you really can´t be sure about your future feelings/ attitudes. So better make sure whatever you do will be reversible.

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7 hours ago, cybil said:

when you choose to not have kids you are in for being asked 'why not?' the rest of your life it seems

I wish people wouldn't ask this question. It took 3 years for my wife to get pregnant, the whole time her friend would be asking this same question, and making her feel bad for not having kids. It really upset her. Some people want kids but can't have them, and it's really insensitive to probe people about it.

 

I remember my sister in law had the same issue, she was often in tears about it. 

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Isn't the hedge for men who want a vasectomy to simply put a deposit in a sperm bank before getting snipped?

 

yes it's not as romantic to be artificially inseminated but it does work pretty darned well, provided the sperm is healthy

 

eta:  I think the questions about "why don't you have kids" arise whether you've been sterilized or not!  

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1 hour ago, lisa13 said:

yes it's not as romantic to be artificially inseminated but it does work pretty darned well, provided the sperm is healthy

 

Sometimes it works too well so you´ll be blessed with twins, triplings...

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@jeba I think you're thinking of invitro fertilization which is a more complicated technique that does indeed increase the chance of multiple births

 

artificial insemination is basically the "turkey baster" method ;)  Keeping the sperm healthy after collection is the only bit that requires any technology or expertise. 

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3 hours ago, lisa13 said:

Isn't the hedge for men who want a vasectomy to simply put a deposit in a sperm bank before getting snipped?

 

yes it's not as romantic to be artificially inseminated but it does work pretty darned well, provided the sperm is healthy

 

eta:  I think the questions about "why don't you have kids" arise whether you've been sterilized or not!  

 

Artificial insemination (in vitro) markedly increases the odds that a fertilizing sperm carries genetic abnormalities, which a portion of ANY given volume of sperm will contain. IIRC, there are theories, but exact reasons aren't yet entirely clear. Naturally, lab workers can seldom tell which of the one lucky sperm among hundreds of thousands may be hiding a genetic defect. 

 

It's not really true that the 'fittest' sperm reach the egg first. Most sperm are stored in tiny folds in the cervix for a while -- can be up to days -- before making their way onward, and this may be a sort of testing ground where defective sperm starve or get stuck before dying off. The surviving sperm are simply 'eh, ok, good enough'.

 

Of course, an artificially inseminated sperm+egg may be fit as a fiddle. I have a friend my age who was conceived this way and is perfectly healthy. But I have two lesbian couple friends/acquaintances (both under 30 when inseminated) who opted for artificial insemination, one from a willing friend they know, one from a sperm bank. In one case, the child has muscular dystrophy and cannot walk yet. In the other, there is some kind of rare genetic disorder, which I'm not privy to the details of, apparently not that life-altering though.

 

Fertility science is still a work in progress in a lot of ways...

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4 hours ago, AndyHix said:

I wish people wouldn't ask this question. It took 3 years for my wife to get pregnant, the whole time her friend would be asking this same question, and making her feel bad for not having kids. It really upset her. Some people want kids but can't have them, and it's really insensitive to probe people about it.

 

I remember my sister in law had the same issue, she was often in tears about it. 

 

And if you've had a few miscarriages along the way... If you tell people, it usually shuts them right up for good, but you shouldn't have to just avoid the pestering.

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