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Searching for Lost Art in Augsburg

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I am searching for lost art that I feel based on my research to date, was last known to exist in the proximity of Augsburg.  The art that I am searching for is not looted art from the second world war but art that became lost in the 18th century.  The art, or more precisely, the two portraits, became lost in 1735-36? and 1753-54?  

I guess I am also wondering if anyone can provide me with an appropriate local website and/or local newspaper that I can further advertise my search for this lost art as I am not in Augsburg.  I am also interested in finding a person that would be interested in sleuthing locally on my behalf.

Thank you,           

Archconserv

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@Archconserv, how sure are you on your research?  I looked at the two links your provided, the dates in your first post and I read on William Meriton Eaton, 2nd Baron of Cheylesmore.

 

Johann Martin Bolzius (1703 - 1765).  According to The British Museum, this was done in 1754, not lost in that year.  If it was lost in that year, how is the Museum able to have a digitised copy online?  Same goes for the Tooanahowi painting.  It was done in 1734, not lost in that year.

 

Additionally, both are Mezzotint, not oil on canvas.  What is more important is that both works were bequeathed to the Museum in 1902 by Eaton.  Eaton was a collector of Mezzotint paintings or prints (Mezzotint is a print - not a reproduction).  I don't believe he would have invested in reproductions, nor would the museum accept one.  Mezzotint came about in the 1600s.  Moreover, how could he have bequeathed these in the 20th Century, if they were lost in the 18th Century?

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The engravings I provided links too are only to provide an image of what the original "lost" oil on canvas portraits look like.  There are numerous engraved portraits available of each subject and I have several myself but what I am looking for are the original oil on canvas works from which these engravings were copied from. 

 

 

Firstly, the Tomo Chachi Portrait.  The mezzotint of Tomo Chachi was produced from the original oil on canvas portrait executed by William Verelst (painter) in September 1734.  John Faber (engraver) copied the portrait in Wm. Verelst studio in London in September of 1734.  The mezzotint was then published in London in November of 1734.  This primary research is derived from contemporary newspaper accounts, so the dates are certain.  Later in 1735 the Minister Samual Urlsperger publish a book entitled Ausführliche Nachricht Von den Saltzburgischen Emigranten, Die sich in America niedergelassen haben, which was published in Halle, 1735. Included as the frontis in this title was what is refereed to as the "Augsburg" variant of the Tomo Chachi engraving.  This line engraving produced by Johann Jacob Kleinschmidt of Augsburg is much smaller but has much greater detail than the London mezzotint engraving by J. Faber.  Also, in the title of the "Augsburg" variant of Tomo Chachi it states that the engraving was copied from "the London Original".  With that said, clearly the original oil on canvas portrait by Wm. Verelst found its way to Augsburg and into the studio of Johann Jacob Kleinschmidt (engraver) (See link of "Augsburg" variant)  https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-1a4d-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

 

So the last known location of the original oil on canvas portrait by Wm, Verelst of Tomo Chachi was in Augsburg at the studio of the engraver Johann Jacob Kleinschmidt in 1735.   There are no records or sightings of the painting after Kleinschmidt's possession of it in Augsburg.

 

 

Secondly, the Portrait of Johann Martin Bolzius.  Johann Martin Bollzius traveled to the studio of Jeremiah Theus (painter) just outside of Charleston, South Carolina in 1753 and had his portrait made so that it could be brought to Europe by his son Gotthilf Israel Bolzius (1739-1774) to be used by Samuel Urlsperger in a publication to promote the further emigration to the failing Salzburg colony in Georgia.  Gotthilf Israel Bolzius traveled to Germany in order to study in Halle.  He was accompanied by someone called Kraus, who worked for the merchant Christian von Münch (1690-1757).  Münch supported the Salzburger emigrants in Ebenezer, lived in Augsburg and was in close contact to Samuel Urlsperger who wished to promote the continued emigration of Salzburgers to Georgia.  So, I would suppose that this was the way the painting was sent to Augsburg and eventually provided to Johann Jakob Haid (engraver) who produced the small mezzotint from the original oil on canvas portrait by Jerimiah Theus (painter) in 1754.   Gotthilf Israel Bolzius never returned to America and died in Halle having left an orphaned daughter.  I have traced this line of his orphaned daughters family as much as possible and I have no indication that the are in possession of the portrait, but this admittedly needs further research.  

 

 

So the last known location of the original oil on canvas portrait by Jerimiah Theus of Johann Martin Bolzius was in Augsburg at the studio of the engraver Johann Jakob Haid in 1754.  There are no records or sightings of the painting after J. J. Haid’s possession of it in Augsburg.

 

One must remember that in a time before photography, oil on canvas portraits were how one would convey ones image from place to place to include engravers who were producing engraved portraits for the mass market.  These portraits became "lost" at their respective engravers studio in Augsburg so that is why I am searching in the area of Augsburg.  They could also have been destroyed but until this is proved otherwise I will continue to search.  

 

 

I hope this clarifies your question. 

 

 

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Additionally, the research with regards to the Gotthilf Israel Bolzius family in German is as follows:

 

Gotthilf Israel Bolzius never returned to America and died in Halle having left an orphaned daughter, Henriette Boltzius.  His first wife and Henriette’s mother preceded him in death.  

 

 

When searching for the date of Henriette Boltzius‘ death I experienced a little surprise: Gotthilf Israel Boltzius married a second time in 1773. His second wife – one year later a widow – was Christiane Wilhelmine Theden (14.07.1753-3.3.1831). They did not have children. Christiane Wilhelmine married the Prussian major-general Gottfried Ludwig Matthias von Hartmann (1738-1807) in 1776. There are two entries in Wikipedia:

 

 

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gottfried_Ludwig_Matthias_von_Hartmann

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Christian_Theden

 

 

Perhaps Boltzius’ second wife was interested in the painting of her father-in-law, but it would certainly be difficult to follow the descendants of the Hartmann family.   

 

 

It is not clear if Christiane Wilhelmine took her step-daughter Henriette to her new husband. However, we know that Henriette was living in Halle in 1824 and died four years later on 12 April 1828 of a stroke (cf. Tod Tochter Bolzius). The entry says that it was a quiet burial (without ringing of bells) and the complete choir had sung.   It is not listed who paid for the burial of Henriette unfortunately.

 

 

 

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